Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Woollacott tells the story of white women colonials from Australia who came to London to find new freedoms and in the process constituted themselves as modern Australian women,' Catherine Hall, University College London [back cover]

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Cosmos Magazine and Colonial Femininity Rachael Weaver , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This article looks at the relatively short and colourful life of Sydney's Cosmos: An Illustrated Australian Magazine—one of the many ephemeral literary magazines that flourished briefly during the colonial era in Australia, and which have been largely forgotten today. From its beginning in September 1894, Cosmos published poetry, short fiction, book reviews, and literary criticism, aiming to offer readers something 'that was purely Australian' as well as providing an important venue for the writings of popular colonial authors such as Louise Mack, Edward Dyson, Ernest Favenc, and many others. This article argues the Cosmos magazine was deeply invested in the development of a distinctively Australian literary culture and that an important focus for accomplishing this was its exploration of metropolitan modes of colonial femininity.'
"When London Calls" and Fleet Street Beckons : Daley's Poem, Reg's Diary - What Happens When It All Goes "Bung"? Meg Tasker , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 1 2011; (p. 107-126)
'A recurrent concern in late nineteenth - and early twentieth-century accounts of Australians in London is how "well" writers were doing. The common conception of the trip "Home" to Britain as a quest for cultural and professional success or recognition is reflected in the title of Angela Woollacott's feminist history, To Try Her Fortune in London, and it motivated many Australian writers, even a nationalist republican such as Henry Lawson, to regard London as the centre of literary culture, the best place in which to exercise their talents and ambitions. The emergence in these decades of a generation of "native-born" white Australian travellers who were related to but self-consciously different from the parent stock both in the colonies and in Britain created an anxious interest which fuelled ongoing discussions in newspapers and periodicals, prompted the creation of Anglo-Australian networks, clubs and publications in London, and supported many a columnist or special correspondent reporting back to Australia on the doings of their contemporaries in the great metropolis.' (Author's introduction, p. 107)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Untitled Jane Carey , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Lilith , no. 11 2002; (p. 148-150)

— Review of To Try Her Fortune in London : Australian Women, Colonialism and Modernity Angela Woollacott 2001 single work criticism
Diving into the Heart of Empire Barbara Garlick , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 14 no. 1 2002;

— Review of To Try Her Fortune in London : Australian Women, Colonialism and Modernity Angela Woollacott 2001 single work criticism
Untitled Jane Carey , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Lilith , no. 11 2002; (p. 148-150)

— Review of To Try Her Fortune in London : Australian Women, Colonialism and Modernity Angela Woollacott 2001 single work criticism
Diving into the Heart of Empire Barbara Garlick , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 14 no. 1 2002;

— Review of To Try Her Fortune in London : Australian Women, Colonialism and Modernity Angela Woollacott 2001 single work criticism
"When London Calls" and Fleet Street Beckons : Daley's Poem, Reg's Diary - What Happens When It All Goes "Bung"? Meg Tasker , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 1 2011; (p. 107-126)
'A recurrent concern in late nineteenth - and early twentieth-century accounts of Australians in London is how "well" writers were doing. The common conception of the trip "Home" to Britain as a quest for cultural and professional success or recognition is reflected in the title of Angela Woollacott's feminist history, To Try Her Fortune in London, and it motivated many Australian writers, even a nationalist republican such as Henry Lawson, to regard London as the centre of literary culture, the best place in which to exercise their talents and ambitions. The emergence in these decades of a generation of "native-born" white Australian travellers who were related to but self-consciously different from the parent stock both in the colonies and in Britain created an anxious interest which fuelled ongoing discussions in newspapers and periodicals, prompted the creation of Anglo-Australian networks, clubs and publications in London, and supported many a columnist or special correspondent reporting back to Australia on the doings of their contemporaries in the great metropolis.' (Author's introduction, p. 107)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Cosmos Magazine and Colonial Femininity Rachael Weaver , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This article looks at the relatively short and colourful life of Sydney's Cosmos: An Illustrated Australian Magazine—one of the many ephemeral literary magazines that flourished briefly during the colonial era in Australia, and which have been largely forgotten today. From its beginning in September 1894, Cosmos published poetry, short fiction, book reviews, and literary criticism, aiming to offer readers something 'that was purely Australian' as well as providing an important venue for the writings of popular colonial authors such as Louise Mack, Edward Dyson, Ernest Favenc, and many others. This article argues the Cosmos magazine was deeply invested in the development of a distinctively Australian literary culture and that an important focus for accomplishing this was its exploration of metropolitan modes of colonial femininity.'
Last amended 4 Apr 2012 10:55:16
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