3386698357164582676.jpg
y Dirt Music single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Georgie Jutland is a mess. At forty, with her career in ruins, she finds herself stranded in White Point with a fisherman she doesn't love and two kids whose dead mother she can never replace. Her days have fallen into domestic tedium and social isolation. Her nights are a blur of vodka and pointless loitering in cyberspace. Leached of all confidence, Georgie has lost her way; she barely recognises herself.

'One morning, in the boozy pre-dawn gloom, she looks up from the computer screen to see a shadow lurking on the beach below, and a dangerous new element enters her life. Luther Fox, the local poacher. Jinx. Outcast...' (From the publisher's website.)

Notes

  • Selected in December 2004 by the Australian public in an ABC poll as Australia's eleventh favourite book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2001 .
      3386698357164582676.jpg
      Extent: 465p.
      Reprinted: 2002 , 2004
      ISBN: 0330363239
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Picador , 2002 .
      Extent: 465p.
      Reprinted: 2003
      ISBN: 0330490249
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Scribner , 2002 .
      Alternative title: Dirt Music : A Novel
      Extent: 411p.
      ISBN: 0743228022
    • Rockland, Massachusetts,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Compass Press , 2002 .
      Extent: 460p.
      ISBN: 158724246X
Alternative title: Par-dessus le bord du monde : roman
Language: French

Works about this Work

Tim Winton’s Dirt Music : Sounding Country/Re-siting Place Stephen Harris , 2015 single work single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 1 2015;
'In his novel, Dirt Music, Tim Winton centres the narrative on the literary conceit of “dirt” music as an elemental thus generative force that at once ‘earths’ and elevates the human being. Luther Fox, one of two central characters, experiences a powerful epiphany upon playing a rudimentary musical instrument through which he creates a reverberative drone summoned from the environment using improvised natural acoustics. In doing so, he enters a paradoxical state of immanent transcendence through the drone experienced as a kind of pure sound. Thus, Dirt Music invites creative speculation about the power of music as source of both music (rhythm/harmony) and ontological ‘poetics’. In this article, I explore the literary significance and philosophical and ethical implications of what Winton has called (after the indigenous poet and elder, Bill Neidjie) “practical mysticism”. In this way, the transcendentally spiritual is always grounded in a “common-sense” experience of fully lived being, just as ‘dirt’ music is ‘rooted’ in the energised abstraction of the aharmonic drone – “common” as both a shared and an empirically immediate sense of wonder at the living, interactive presence of the natural world. In Dirt Music, then, the act of making music is richly allusive: to make music becomes a means of working towards a felt and vital connection with country; but it is also to understand how music works conductively as indigenous sound, effecting the animating interplay or interconnection between individual consciousness and the living presence and force of natural world as ecology and wilderness, landscape and country.' (Publication abstract)
Australian Literature, Risk, and the Global Climate Challenge Graham Huggan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature, Interpretation, Theory , vol. 26 no. 2 2015; (p. 85-105)
'Envision two scenarios, the one real the other imagined, both played out in Australia's southeast regions. In the imagined one, taken from George Turner's post-apocalyptic story “The Fittest,” the year is 2035 and parts of Melbourne are under water. The embattled city is divided into two camps, the Swill and the Sweet, who make up nine tenths and one tenth of the population, respectively. The Swill live in run-down tenement blocks in the low-lying southern and western areas of the city, which are at the mercy of rising sea levels caused by the catastrophic melting of the ice caps. The Sweet look down on the Swill, both literally and metaphorically, from their privileged vantage on the higher levels. The Swill, meanwhile, are left to fend for themselves in a daily and brutal struggle for survival: jobless, hungry, they are little more than predatory animals, a racially stigmatized underclass equivalent to Asia's barbarian hordes (Maxwell 20–21; Morgan). In the real one, the year is 2013 and parts of Tasmania have been transformed into an inferno. A devastating heatwave covering most of the southern and eastern parts of Australia has caused wildfires to spread, with its largest offshore island bearing the brunt of it. There are few deaths, but hundreds of people are displaced and irreparable damage is done to thousands of hectares of land and property. Media commentators return to that most obdurate if readily reversible of clichés, Australia as un/lucky country, linking the sins of commission (the perils of boom-and-bust economics) to those of omission (the price paid for ecological neglect).1 Spoiling as always for a fight, the British environmental campaigner George Monbiot sanctimoniously reminds his antipodean cousins that they burn twice as much carbon as his own countrymen, and that the history of Australia, framed as a “land of opportunity in which progress is limited only by the rate at which natural resources can be extracted,” doubles as a cautionary tale of what happens when “climate change clashes with a story of great cultural power.” Lest the moral of the story be unclear, Monbiot flourishingly underscores it: “Australia's new weather,” he says, “demands a new politics, a politics capable of responding to an existential threat.”' (Author's introduction)
From Conquest to Collapse : Ecological Thoughts in the Depiction of Wheatbelt in Cloudstreet and Dirt Music Xu Xianjing , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies – Proceedings of the 14th International Conference of Australian Studies in China 2015; (p. 132-145)
This paper is an analysis of Tim Winton's depiction of wheat land in the novels Cloudstreet and Dirt Music.
Water Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 16-48)

'In Dirt Music, remembering the time before a car crash took the lives of his brother Darkie, Darkie's wife Sal, and their two children, Bird and Bullet, Luther Fox recalls Bird's question : 'Lu, how come water lets you through it?' Bird is the one who saw God, and 'if anyone saw God it would likely be her. Bird's the nearest thing to an angelic being.' Bird's question suggests the function of water in Winton's novels. Water is everywhere in his writing, as people sail on it, dive into it, live on the edge of it. Clearly the sea and the river are vital aspects of the writer's own experience. But water is more than an omnipresent feature of his writing and his life, the oceanscape of his stories. It is something that 'lets you through'. It lets you through because it is the passage to a different state of being, sometimes in dream, sometimes in physical extremity, but always offers itself as the medium of transformation. When it lets you through - whether to escape to a different life, as a rite of passage to adulthood, to see the world in a new way or to discover the holiness of the earth or the wonder of the world, whether it is the baptismal water of redemption to an opening to a world of silence - and it is all these things- you become different.' (Author's introduction 16)

‘Over the Cliff and into the Water’ : Love, Death and Confession in Tim Winton’s Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tim Winton : Critical Essays 2014; (p. 96-121)

'Tim Winton's female characters show a strong tendency towards self-threatening behaviors, transience and ferocity. This is evident in the violent deaths of Jewel in An Open Swimmer, Maureen in Shallows, Ida's murder in In the Winter Dark [...], Tegwyn's self-harm in That Eye, the Sky, Dolly's alcoholism in Cloudstreet, Eva Sanderson's Hutchence-lookalike death in Breath and, obviously, the ephemerality of mothers in Dirt Music...' (96)

On Focuses on the Oceans' Ecology Reveled in Tim Winton's Main Literature Works Hong-Bo Du , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Xihua University , no. 6 2014; (p. 53-55)
'Descriptions and focuses on ocean is a necessary part of the development of Australian literature, on which the world famous Australian writer Tim Winton is considered as one of the representatives. This thesis is mainly to introduce Tim Winton and his representative works which focus on the ocean; the author lists the most influential works of Tim Winton in order to present the common as well as the ecological concept of environmental protection reflected in his works.' (Publication abstract)
A Signature of Topophilia in Winton’s Shallows and Dirt Music Yunyi Zhu , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , December no. 1 2014; (p. 55-71)
Shadow of the Dead : Stories of Transience in Tim Winton's Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 57 no. 1 2012; (p. 164-181)

Explores Tim Winton's treatment of female characters in his fiction and their linkage with images of transience and death.

Books That Changed Me : Glenn Orgais Glenn Orgias , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 2 September 2012; (p. 14)
Gendered Spaces : The Poetics of Domesticity in Tim Winton’s Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association of Studies on Australia, , vol. 3 no. 2 2012; (p. 59-79)
'How can the fictional representation of space and domestic interority be interpreted in fictional works like Dirt Music, The Riders or Winton's latest novel Breath? This article argues that the house as an active living space in Winton's work functions significantly in the context of describing a mythical, commercially marketable, nostalgic image of rural Australia as a place of masculine redefinition and maturation. The analysis of spatiality in this context provides a deeper engagement with the connection between space and gender, highlighting the ambiguous nature of specifically gendered spheres in the architecture of Winton's fictional dwelling places. Deviating from the original Victorian concept of "separate spheres", which set up clear definitions of male and female domestic spaces, Winton's narratives place priority on highlighting the male influence on the originally female domains in the house. It is argued that these spaces reflect the troubling binary between male presence and female absence, highlighting the desires and troubles of the male characters but also female trauma, self-harm and displacement. These are some of the issues this paper addresses, showing how the postcolonial dialectic between place, space and gender can be applied to Winton's fictional "traumascapes" (M. Tumarkin).' (Author's abstract)
Bodies that Speak : Mediating Female Embodiment in Tim Winton's Fiction Hannah Schuerholz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 32-50)
Fully Formed Rosemary Neill , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23 - 24 April 2011; (p. 506)
To mark the thirtieth anniversary of The Australian / Vogel award, Rosemary Neill surveys the highs and lows of a prize that has launched the careers of many leading writers.
Un Oleaje Renovado Winston Manrique Sabogal , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: El país , 7 May 2011;
Además del Nobel Patrick White y del doblemente galardonado con el Booker Peter Carey, la lista de autores australianos es creciente en España. Una literatura sin tópicos ni etiquetas. [The number of Australian writers, besides Patrick White and Peter Carey, who are known and read in Spain is growing. Theirs is a literature that exceeds classifications or labels - Translation.]
Mediation at Work : Tim Winton's Fiction in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 71 no. 1 2011;
'Australian literary production reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically constrained and enabled by a complex system of institutions, individuals, practices and values. However, upon entering a foreign literary market through translation, Australian literary narratives are subjected to further constraints imposed by similar agencies within that culture which mediate the processes of selection, translation and critical reception. My analysis of Tim Winton's Dirt Music (2001) enables a greater understanding of how the writer's use of landscape positions him within that post-Romantic tradition of Australian literature that incorporates major Australian writers of prose and poetry such as Randolph Stow, Patrick White, Judith Wright and Les Murray...' (Author's introduction p. 1)
Personal Trauma/Historical Trauma in Tim Winton's Dirt Music Barbara Arizti Martin , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Splintered Glass : Facets of Trauma in the Post-Colony and Beyond 2011; (p. 175-189)
Barbara Arizti looks at the way aspects of trauma are represented in Tim Winton's Dirty Music .
Reconfiguring Australia's Literary Canon : Antipodean Cultural Tectonics Salhia Ben-Messahel , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 34 no. 1 2011; (p. 77-91)
'This paper shows how an Australian community imagined by the European continent has evolved to become more inclusive of otherness, be it in the form of non-Anglo-Australian cultures, Australian regional cultures, or a significant Indigenous culture intimately linked to the land. In this process, which is comparable to tectonic shifts, some Australian authors have attempted, within a 21st-century global village, to map intercultural spaces that reveal a pervasive sense of emptiness and the uncanny.' (Author's abstract)
Pitfalls, Impossibilities and Small Victories in Translating Humor : A Case Study Based on Tim Winton's Cloudstreet and Dirt Music Jorge Salavert , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Dimensions of Humor : Explorations in Linguistics, Literature, Cultural Studies and Translation 2010; (p. 311-331)
Author's abstract: Although it is usually inevitable that some loss occurs in the translation of humorous passages, particularly where the humour involves a pun or wordplay, small and enjoyable victories are also achievable. Australian humour has some distinctive characteristics that set it apart from other English-language cultural settings. I argue that, for a reliable Spanish translation (or any other language for that matter) of Australian humour to occur, the translator needs to be deeply familiar with Australian society and language. If a translator is unfamiliar with Australian colloquialisms, there is a risk that the humour is misunderstood or not perceived at all, so it may be advisable to analyse the text carefully in order to avoid serious pitfalls. In this article I use examples from two novels by Australian novelist Tim Winton, and Spanish translations of them: my own unpublished translation of Cloudstreet and Música de la tierra (2008), Núria Llonch Seguí's translation of Dirt Music.
y Luminous Moments : The Contemporary Sacred Lyn McCredden , Hindmarsh : ATF Press , 2010 Z1891887 2010 single work criticism 'Luminous Moments is an idea, a way of seeing, an imaginative practice of openness to the everyday and the random. In the early twenty-first century, human beings seek new ways of constructing and comprehending ultimate meanings. For many, the revival of evolutionary thinking, along with the centenary of Darwin, is creating a new faith. Long live the prophets Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens! For others, the earth in all its beauty and its present agonies is where they seek to understand their existence. The institutions of church, mosque, temple or shrine still hold out the promise of ultimate meaning, ultimate understanding. But all around us-in popular music, film, graffiti, literature, and in the conversations we hold around these cultural forms-the sacred pervades, illuminates, teases and beckons us. Luminous Moments considers how we might open ourselves to these new forms of sacred awareness. This is what poets, musicians, artists and thinkers lead us to apprehend: that the sacred dimensions of our lives are mobile, non-judgmental, continually promising to open us out beyond ourselves. The pervasiveness of the sacred is the promise of new cultural and moral possibilities.'
Engaging the Masses : Tim Winton, Activism and the Literary Bestseller Brigid Rooney , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literary Activists : Australian Writer-Intellectuals and Public Life 2009; (p. 158-180)
y Storymen Hannah Rachel Bell , Cambridge Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2009 Z1637200 2009 single work life story

'What do the artistic works of acclaimed author Tim Winton and eminent Ngarinyin lawman Bungal (David) Mowaljarlai have in common?

'According to Hannah Rachel Bell they both reflect sacred relationship with the natural world, the biological imperative of a male rite of passage, an emergent urban tribalism, and the fundamental role of story in the transmission of cultural knowledge. In Bell's four decade friendship with Mowaljarlai, she had to confront the cultural assumptions that sculpted her way of seeing. The journey was life-changing.

'When she returned to teaching in 2001 Tim Winton's novels featured in the curriculum. She recognised an eerie familiarity and thought Winton must have been influenced by traditional elders to express such an 'indigenous' perspective. She wrote to him. This resulted in 4 years of correspondence and an excavation of converging world views - exposed through personal memoir, letters, paintings and conversations and culminating in Storymen.' (From the publisher's website.)

Best Reads in 2002 Arnold Zable , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Jewish News , 27 December vol. 69 no. 17 2002; (p. 30)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel ; Gilgamesh : A Novel Joan London 2001 single work novel
Untitled Frances Devlin-Glass , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 1 no. 2002; (p. 81-84)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Perils of the Popular Peter Craven , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 62 no. 1 2003; (p. 133-143)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
'Peter Craven appraises three recent novels, one English [Ian McEwan's Atonement], one Australian [Winton's Dirt Music] and one American [Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections], that contrive to cross the boundaries of serious and popular fiction' and assesses the degrees of artistic success. (p.133)
Living Stones Magdalena Ball , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Coppertales : A Journal of Rural Arts , no. 9 2003; (p. 86-88)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : For Bronwyn Rivers , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15-16 September 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : Against Peter Craven , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15-16 September 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
On My Bedside Table Claire Clarke , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 6 June 2009; (p. 20)

— Review of My French Life Vicki Archer 2006 single work autobiography ; Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Untitled Peter Gordon , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Asian Review of Books

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Deeper Music in North -West Mud Stella Clarke , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 3-4 November 2001; (p. 10)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Rhythms of Life Peter Pierce , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 6 November vol. 119 no. 6300 2001; (p. 82)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Dirt and Holy Nature Brian Matthews , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 24 November 2001; (p. 9)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
A Personality Junkyard Brian McFarlane , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 236 2001; (p. 24-25)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Sunday Age Book Focus : Dirt Music : The Book 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 2 December 2001; (p. 11)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Sound Winton Juliette Hughes , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , January-February vol. 12 no. 1 2002; (p. 43-44)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel ; Dirt Music : Music for a Novel by Tim Winton 2001 anthology
Dirt Music by Tim Winton Bill Wootton , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Autumn vol. 10 no. 1 2002; (p. 20)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Power of the Natural World Elizabeth Dean , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Summer no. 88 2002; (p. 101-102)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Almost Reaching the Clouds Mikaela Castledine , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 15 June 2002; (p. 16)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
At Odds with the Land Michael Kerrigan , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 31 May no. 5174 2002; (p. 21)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Earth, Ground, Soil and Bare Bones Cath Kenneally , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 167 2002; (p. 104-106)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel ; Earth Bruce Pascoe 2001 single work novel
Books : In Paperback Michelle Griffin , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 27 October 2002; (p. 9)

— Review of Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Author Winton Joins Artists in Logging Boycott Andrew Darby , 2002 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 6 November 2002; (p. 9)
Tim Winton, Natural Born Writer Michael Sheather , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Women's Weekly , October 2002; (p. 56-58)
The Travelling Heroine in Recent Australian Fiction Elizabeth Webby , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: 'Unemployed at Last!' : Essays on Australian Literature to 2002 for Julian Croft 2002; (p. 175-186)
This essay reviews and discusses seven Australian novels published in 2000 and 2001 which all focus on 'travelling heroines'. Trying to explore what these novels tell us about the current state of Australian fiction, Webby sees a trend to avoid contemporary settings and topics and thus a confrontation with current political and social issues such as discrimination and racism. She observes a move from the nineteenth to the twentieth century as 'the favoured domain for serious Australian historical fiction', and a trend to return to essentially nineteenth-century themes and structures.
Winton First Among Peers 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 27 May 2003; (p. 3)
Books and Covers : Reflections on Some Recent Australian Novels Elizabeth Webby , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 29 no. 2003; (p. 79-86)
Compares the covers of Australian, American and English editions of recent Australian novels, including three novels short-listed for the 2002 Miles Franklin Award.
Big Stars for Dirt Music Brighten Author's Heart Sandy George , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 3-4 June 2006; (p. 3)
Fremantle : The Port as a Threshold of Consciousness in the Novel Graham Nowland , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 51 no. 2006; (p. 145-158)
Explores the David Lodge q.v. notion of the narrative nature of consciousness in fiction with regard to literature set in the Western Australian Port of Fremantle. Discussion ranges over a period from 1879 to 2006.
Gas Doing Dirt to Our Coast : Winton Victoria Laurie , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 25 June 2007; (p. 4)
The Beat of the Land : Place and Music in Tim Winton's Dirt Music Kylie Crane , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Anglistik und Amerikanistik , vol. 54 no. 1 2006; (p. 21-32)
'The title of Tim Winton's 2001 novel Dirt Music reveals one of the central binaries at work within: Dirt, or place, presence, nature on the one hand, and Music, or emotions, past culture in the other. Dirt Music, set in Western Australia, revolves around the love story between Georgie Jutland and Lu(ther) Fox. Lu, a folk guitarist, retreats from society after the tragic death of his family, who also formed his band. During his stay in the deserted North Australian coastal region, he experiments with the possibilities of living - and making music - outside of cultural constraints. The emphasis in this paper will be on how the two factors of dirt and music interplay within the construction of his identity. The novel proposes a perspective on music that eventually offers a reconciliation of the alienation of man's identity between nature and culture.' (Author's abstract)
A Beach Somewhere : The Australian Littoral Imagination at Play Bruce Bennett , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 31-44)
A remarkable array of late twentieth and early twenty-first century Australian novelists and short story writers have presented images of West Australian beaches and coastlines. These authors include Robert Drewe, Jack Davis, Randolph Stow, Peter Cowan, Dorothy Hewett, and Tim Winton. Their human dramas have a peculiar poignancy when played out against the natural elements of these Western coasts. Sexual, emotional, or spiritual crises occur in maritime settings that both enhance their memorability and reveal humanity's fragile hold on the continent. (abstract taken from The Littoral Zone)
Writing the Land : Western Australia As Textual Space in Tim Winton's 'Dirt Music' Malathy Anandavalli , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 299-311)
A Place in the Wilderness? : Tim Winton's Dirt Music and Margaret Atwood's Surfacing Kylie Crane , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Territorial Terrors : Contested Spaces in Colonial and Postcolonial Writing 2007; (p. 71-87)
Engaging the Masses : Tim Winton, Activism and the Literary Bestseller Brigid Rooney , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literary Activists : Australian Writer-Intellectuals and Public Life 2009; (p. 158-180)
y Storymen Hannah Rachel Bell , Cambridge Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2009 Z1637200 2009 single work life story

'What do the artistic works of acclaimed author Tim Winton and eminent Ngarinyin lawman Bungal (David) Mowaljarlai have in common?

'According to Hannah Rachel Bell they both reflect sacred relationship with the natural world, the biological imperative of a male rite of passage, an emergent urban tribalism, and the fundamental role of story in the transmission of cultural knowledge. In Bell's four decade friendship with Mowaljarlai, she had to confront the cultural assumptions that sculpted her way of seeing. The journey was life-changing.

'When she returned to teaching in 2001 Tim Winton's novels featured in the curriculum. She recognised an eerie familiarity and thought Winton must have been influenced by traditional elders to express such an 'indigenous' perspective. She wrote to him. This resulted in 4 years of correspondence and an excavation of converging world views - exposed through personal memoir, letters, paintings and conversations and culminating in Storymen.' (From the publisher's website.)

Pitfalls, Impossibilities and Small Victories in Translating Humor : A Case Study Based on Tim Winton's Cloudstreet and Dirt Music Jorge Salavert , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Dimensions of Humor : Explorations in Linguistics, Literature, Cultural Studies and Translation 2010; (p. 311-331)
Author's abstract: Although it is usually inevitable that some loss occurs in the translation of humorous passages, particularly where the humour involves a pun or wordplay, small and enjoyable victories are also achievable. Australian humour has some distinctive characteristics that set it apart from other English-language cultural settings. I argue that, for a reliable Spanish translation (or any other language for that matter) of Australian humour to occur, the translator needs to be deeply familiar with Australian society and language. If a translator is unfamiliar with Australian colloquialisms, there is a risk that the humour is misunderstood or not perceived at all, so it may be advisable to analyse the text carefully in order to avoid serious pitfalls. In this article I use examples from two novels by Australian novelist Tim Winton, and Spanish translations of them: my own unpublished translation of Cloudstreet and Música de la tierra (2008), Núria Llonch Seguí's translation of Dirt Music.
Fully Formed Rosemary Neill , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23 - 24 April 2011; (p. 506)
To mark the thirtieth anniversary of The Australian / Vogel award, Rosemary Neill surveys the highs and lows of a prize that has launched the careers of many leading writers.
Un Oleaje Renovado Winston Manrique Sabogal , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: El país , 7 May 2011;
Además del Nobel Patrick White y del doblemente galardonado con el Booker Peter Carey, la lista de autores australianos es creciente en España. Una literatura sin tópicos ni etiquetas. [The number of Australian writers, besides Patrick White and Peter Carey, who are known and read in Spain is growing. Theirs is a literature that exceeds classifications or labels - Translation.]
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Creating Space in Tim Winton's Dirt Music Britta Kuhlenbeck , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 55-69)
'I am interested in the questions of how contemporary artists address concepts of space and whether spatial theories developed in geography provide a useful approach to this question. With this work in progress I am following my ongoing interest in merging the academic fields of geography and literature. And in my view, a linking occurs in the notion of 'space' as space is a core concept in both fields. Firstly, I will try to explain why it is worthwhile to think about space followed by an attempt to define the terms space and place. I will propose a certain understanding of space which is best represented by narrative. As an example for my analysis, I have chosen Tim Winton's novel Dirt Music.' (Author's abstract p. 55)
Mediation at Work : Tim Winton's Fiction in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 71 no. 1 2011;
'Australian literary production reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically constrained and enabled by a complex system of institutions, individuals, practices and values. However, upon entering a foreign literary market through translation, Australian literary narratives are subjected to further constraints imposed by similar agencies within that culture which mediate the processes of selection, translation and critical reception. My analysis of Tim Winton's Dirt Music (2001) enables a greater understanding of how the writer's use of landscape positions him within that post-Romantic tradition of Australian literature that incorporates major Australian writers of prose and poetry such as Randolph Stow, Patrick White, Judith Wright and Les Murray...' (Author's introduction p. 1)
Last amended 12 Mar 2015 16:15:39
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