Indigenous Texts and Narratives single work   criticism  
Indigenous Texts and Narratives Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia have been telling stories since time immemorial. Although Indigenous oral cultures were once believed to be dying out, it is clear today, in Australia and elsewhere, that many aspects of these ancient cultures have survived in Indigenous communities, and are now thriving as a living, evolving part of contemporary life. Oral songs and narratives are traditionally an embodied and emplaced form of knowledge. Information is stored in people's minds in various narrative forms which, at the appropriate time, are transmitted from the mouths of the older generation to the ears of the young. Many narratives are connected to specific sites, and are transmitted in the course of people's movements through their country. Certain songs and stories are only transmitted in specific ceremonial contexts, while others circulate in the informal settings of everyday life. For oral traditions to survive, then, "the learning generation" must be in direct physical proximity to "the teaching generation". People must also have access to significant sites in their country, and be free to perform their ceremonies, speak their languages, and carry out their everyday cultural activities.' (Introduction)

Notes

  • Contains the following sections: From the Beginning: Oral Traditions; Early Aboriginal Writings; Contemporary Aboriginal Writing; Autobiography and Biography; Fiction; Children's Writing; Contested Identities; The Politics of Reading.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Cambridge Companion to Australian Literature Elizabeth Webby (editor), Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2000 Z25739 2000 anthology criticism

    'This book introduces in a lively and succinct way the major writers, literary movements, styles and genres that, at the beginning of a new century, are seen as constituting the field of Australian literature. The book consciously takes a perspective that sees literary works not as aesthetic objects created in isolation by unique individuals, but as cultural products influenced and constrained by the social, political and economic circumstances of their times. It will be an indispensable reference for both national and international readers. It covers Indigenous texts, colonial writing and reading, poetry, fiction and theater throughout two centuries, biography and autobiography, and literary criticism in Australia.' (Publication summary)

    Melbourne : Cambridge University Press , 2000
    pg. 19-49

Works about this Work

White Journeys into Black Country Tracy Spencer , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 149-161)
'Rebecca Forbes and Jim Page were English immigrants who lived and died amongst the Adnyamathanha people of the northern Flinders Ranges in the first half of the twentieth century. The first time I saw their two graves there - just the two of them, on their won up the hill, a little above the community at Nepabunna - I asked the obvious question: How did they come to be there? The journeys involved in these trajectories - immigration from England to Australia, migration from the coast to the inland - are the focus of this paper.' (Author's introduction, 149)
White Journeys into Black Country Tracy Spencer , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 149-161)
'Rebecca Forbes and Jim Page were English immigrants who lived and died amongst the Adnyamathanha people of the northern Flinders Ranges in the first half of the twentieth century. The first time I saw their two graves there - just the two of them, on their won up the hill, a little above the community at Nepabunna - I asked the obvious question: How did they come to be there? The journeys involved in these trajectories - immigration from England to Australia, migration from the coast to the inland - are the focus of this paper.' (Author's introduction, 149)
Last amended 12 Jan 2017 16:46:51
19-49 Indigenous Texts and NarrativesAustLit
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