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This image has been sourced from online.
Issue Details: First known date: 2001... 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Once upon a time that was called 1828, before all the living things on the land and the fishes in the sea were destroyed, there was a man named William Buelow Gould, a convict in Van Dieman's Land who fell in love with a black woman and discovered too late that to love is not safe. Silly Billy Gould, invader of Australia, liar, murderer, forger, fantasist, condemned to live in the most brutal penal colony in the British Empire, and there ordered to paint a book of fish. Once upon a time, miraculous things happened'. (Source: Trove)

Notes

  • Listed in The New York Times Book Review's list of Notable Books for 2002.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Grove Press , 2001 .
      Extent: 404p.p.
      Edition info: 1st US ed.
      Note/s:
      • Originally published: Sydney : Pan Macmillan, 2001.
      ISBN: 0802117112
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books , 2002 .
      Extent: 404p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1843541467, 1843540215(hbk)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2002 .
      Extent: 445p.
      ISBN: 0330363786 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books , 2003 .
      Extent: 404p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1843540703
    • North Sydney, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Random House , 2012 .
      4390420341639362035.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 447p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1 February 2014
      ISBN: 9781742756110 (epub)
Alternative title: Goulds Buch der Fische : Ein Roman in zwolf Fischen
Language: German

Works about this Work

Richard Flanagan, a Bright Star Rising from Australian Literary World Li Yao , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 215-219)
'Being unfamiliar to most Chinese readers, Richard Flanagan is one of the most accomplished and distinctive writers in Australia in recent twenty years. Representing growing diversification of multiculturalism in Australia, all his works, from Death of a River Guide, The Sound of One Hand Clapping and Gould's Book of Fish : A Novel in Twelve Fish to The Unknown Terrorist, Wanting and The Narrow Road to the Deep North, are miraculous flowers bursting into bloom in the fertile soil of life, in which there is a conciliation of post-modernism and realism in creation, characterized by strong self-consciousness and magnificent realistic features. Some critics argue Flanagan reminds them of such masters as Whitman, Joyce, Faulkner and Garcia Marquez etc. As the laureat of the 2014 Man Booker Prize for English literature, Richard Flanagan is a bright star rising high from Tasmania, Australia.' (215-216)
Communicating the Incommunicable Kirsten Krauth , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Author , June vol. 47 no. 1 2015; (p. 14-17)
Developing Magical Realism’s Irony in Gould’s Book of Fish Ben Holgate , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 5 2014;

'Irony is an underlying factor of magical realist fiction. Richard Flanagan’s novel Gould’s Book of Fish (2001) is imbued with a particular kind of irony that results from a gap between a contemporary reader’s lament for a lost pre-modern world, that of Indigenous Tasmanians, and the book’s eponymous nineteenth-century narrator’s rage about the disappearance of that culture, one which the British convict cannot fully comprehend. Flanagan exploits and plays with this irony by using a range of epistemological magical realist techniques and associated metafictional devices. This enables Flanagan to navigate around his position as a white settler author to indirectly portray Tasmanian pre-colonial society. The novel creates a second type of irony by attacking the European Enlightenment as being a tool for imperialist domination and the subjugation of Indigenous societies, while at the same time the text upholds the Enlightenment’s humanitarian ideals. Gould’s Book of Fish, therefore, plays a critical role in the development of magical realism in contemporary Australian fiction.' (Publication abstract)

Resisting Biopolitics through “Diaphanous Wonder”: Richard Flanagan's Gould's Book of Fish (2003) Doro Wiese , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities , vol. 6 no. 3 2014;

'In Gould's Book of Fish (2003), author Richard Flanagan manages to invent a format in which content and style account for historical events on Sarah Island, Tasmania in the 1820s, yet he does so in a manner that is not in the least objective, disinterested or fact-orientated. The perspective of Gould's Book of Fish's (Flanagan, 2003) first-person narrator is highly subjective, usually unreliable and always less than truthful. Flanagan (2003) thereby shows that literature can provide a form of knowledge that differs from historical truth, but without being its dialectical opposite. Literature can construct a non-referential narrative space in which experiences unfold that hardly unimaginable. Literature can show the urge and desire to understand historical events that are terrible to relate to. It can invent a story that can account for the consequences of a violent colonial system. Yet, above all, the novel stresses a desire to render stories of unspeakable horrors through what can be call the “becoming-fish” of its first-person narrator. This desire expresses a hyperbolic love of each and everyone, one which extends so far as to even include all the other wonders of this world in its account too. By depicting convicts and natives as loving and lovable persons, author Richard Flanagan (2003) refrains from reducing them to the colonial conditions in which they were caught up. He thereby offers a point of view that differs from Giorgio Agamben's (1998) highly influential account of “bare life.” I will take this perspective, in which life and its conditions cannot be lumped together, as a point of departure from which to criticise Agamben's (1998) transhistorical and transnational account of biopolitical determinations of life.' (Publication abstract)

Reconfigurations of History and Embodying Books in 'Gould’s Book of Fish' Ashley Rose Whitmore , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 7 no. 2 2012;
'Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish presents the relationship among colonizers, the colonized, and outsiders through an exploration of written documents. This article explores the violence that certain reconstructions of history cause, the relationship between characters and physical texts, and Flanagan’s own physical construction of his novel. This article looks at the written form’s connection to the question that floats throughout the narrative: what does it mean to represent history?' [Author's abstract]
Putting on the Plum Christopher Tayler , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 31 October vol. 24 no. 21 2002; (p. 26-27)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
[Untitled] Ann-Marie Thomas , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , June no. 6 2002;

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Linnaeus Downunder Frances Devlin-Glass , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 179-184)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : For Malcolm Knox , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : Against Mark Tewfik , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Awards Nicholas Birns , 2002 single work column
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 16 no. 1 2002; (p. 74-75)
2002 Australian Literary Society Gold Medal Award 2002 single work column
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 1 no. 2002; (p. 114-115)
Includes the judges report on the winning work.
Book Briefs - Modern Australian Classics & Some 2002 single work column
— Appears in: Blast , Winter no. 47 2002; (p. 13)
Wishing for Modernity : Temporality and Desire in Gould's Book of Fish Jesse Shipway , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 43-53)
Shipway's article examines Flanagan's representation of Tasmanian versions of history and modernity in Gould's Book of Fish. As one of the recurring motifs in Flanagan's writing is 'the impoverishment of the Tasmanian present, a state of affairs both enacted by, and embodied in, a failed modernity', his fiction poses the question: 'how are we to summon up hope for Tasmania's future, when its past is so overwhelmingly full of defeat?'. Shipways argues that the answer proposed in the novel is 'to radically fictionalise that past, and to imbue it with the residue of collective longing left over from the project of hydro-electrification that was aborted after the Franklin River conflicts of the early 1980s' (43). 'In Gould's Book of Fish, Richard Flanagan returns to the time of Tasmania's first modernity in order to realise his hopes and ambitions for another modernity that is yet to come. The tragic-comic failure of that fictional modernisation embodies the ambivalence he feels about the real history of Tasmanian modernity' (44).
Cover Stories Rebecca Lancashire , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 17 July 2004; (p. 1-2)
Australian publishers believe buyers are influenced by the design and colour of book covers.
Last amended 12 Mar 2015 16:19:14
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