4390420341639362035.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Once upon a time that was called 1828, before all the living things on the land and the fishes in the sea were destroyed, there was a man named William Buelow Gould, a convict in Van Dieman's Land who fell in love with a black woman and discovered too late that to love is not safe. Silly Billy Gould, invader of Australia, liar, murderer, forger, fantasist, condemned to live in the most brutal penal colony in the British Empire, and there ordered to paint a book of fish. Once upon a time, miraculous things happened'. (Source: Trove)

Notes

  • Listed in The New York Times Book Review's list of Notable Books for 2002.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Grove Press , 2001 .
      Extent: 404p.p.
      Edition info: 1st US ed.
      Note/s:
      • Originally published: Sydney : Pan Macmillan, 2001.
      ISBN: 0802117112
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books , 2002 .
      Extent: 404p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1843541467, 1843540215(hbk)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2002 .
      Extent: 445p.
      ISBN: 0330363786 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Atlantic Books , 2003 .
      Extent: 404p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1843540703
    • North Sydney, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Random House , 2012 .
      4390420341639362035.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 447p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1 February 2014
      ISBN: 9781742756110 (epub)
Alternative title: Goulds Buch der Fische : Ein Roman in zwolf Fischen
Language: German

Works about this Work

Communicating the Incommunicable Kirsten Krauth , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Author , June vol. 47 no. 1 2015; (p. 14-17)
Richard Flanagan, a Bright Star Rising from Australian Literary World Li Yao , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 215-219)
'Being unfamiliar to most Chinese readers, Richard Flanagan is one of the most accomplished and distinctive writers in Australia in recent twenty years. Representing growing diversification of multiculturalism in Australia, all his works, from Death of a River Guide, The Sound of One Hand Clapping and Gould's Book of Fish : A Novel in Twelve Fish to The Unknown Terrorist, Wanting and The Narrow Road to the Deep North, are miraculous flowers bursting into bloom in the fertile soil of life, in which there is a conciliation of post-modernism and realism in creation, characterized by strong self-consciousness and magnificent realistic features. Some critics argue Flanagan reminds them of such masters as Whitman, Joyce, Faulkner and Garcia Marquez etc. As the laureat of the 2014 Man Booker Prize for English literature, Richard Flanagan is a bright star rising high from Tasmania, Australia.' (215-216)
Resisting Biopolitics through “Diaphanous Wonder”: Richard Flanagan's Gould's Book of Fish (2003) Doro Wiese , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities , vol. 6 no. 3 2014;

'In Gould's Book of Fish (2003), author Richard Flanagan manages to invent a format in which content and style account for historical events on Sarah Island, Tasmania in the 1820s, yet he does so in a manner that is not in the least objective, disinterested or fact-orientated. The perspective of Gould's Book of Fish's (Flanagan, 2003) first-person narrator is highly subjective, usually unreliable and always less than truthful. Flanagan (2003) thereby shows that literature can provide a form of knowledge that differs from historical truth, but without being its dialectical opposite. Literature can construct a non-referential narrative space in which experiences unfold that hardly unimaginable. Literature can show the urge and desire to understand historical events that are terrible to relate to. It can invent a story that can account for the consequences of a violent colonial system. Yet, above all, the novel stresses a desire to render stories of unspeakable horrors through what can be call the “becoming-fish” of its first-person narrator. This desire expresses a hyperbolic love of each and everyone, one which extends so far as to even include all the other wonders of this world in its account too. By depicting convicts and natives as loving and lovable persons, author Richard Flanagan (2003) refrains from reducing them to the colonial conditions in which they were caught up. He thereby offers a point of view that differs from Giorgio Agamben's (1998) highly influential account of “bare life.” I will take this perspective, in which life and its conditions cannot be lumped together, as a point of departure from which to criticise Agamben's (1998) transhistorical and transnational account of biopolitical determinations of life.' (Publication abstract)

Developing Magical Realism’s Irony in Gould’s Book of Fish Ben Holgate , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 5 2014;

'Irony is an underlying factor of magical realist fiction. Richard Flanagan’s novel Gould’s Book of Fish (2001) is imbued with a particular kind of irony that results from a gap between a contemporary reader’s lament for a lost pre-modern world, that of Indigenous Tasmanians, and the book’s eponymous nineteenth-century narrator’s rage about the disappearance of that culture, one which the British convict cannot fully comprehend. Flanagan exploits and plays with this irony by using a range of epistemological magical realist techniques and associated metafictional devices. This enables Flanagan to navigate around his position as a white settler author to indirectly portray Tasmanian pre-colonial society. The novel creates a second type of irony by attacking the European Enlightenment as being a tool for imperialist domination and the subjugation of Indigenous societies, while at the same time the text upholds the Enlightenment’s humanitarian ideals. Gould’s Book of Fish, therefore, plays a critical role in the development of magical realism in contemporary Australian fiction.' (Publication abstract)

Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Reconfigurations of History and Embodying Books in 'Gould’s Book of Fish' Ashley Rose Whitmore , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 7 no. 2 2012;
'Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish presents the relationship among colonizers, the colonized, and outsiders through an exploration of written documents. This article explores the violence that certain reconstructions of history cause, the relationship between characters and physical texts, and Flanagan’s own physical construction of his novel. This article looks at the written form’s connection to the question that floats throughout the narrative: what does it mean to represent history?' [Author's abstract]
Books of the Week Dawn Albinger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 21 October 2012; (p. 37)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Les Murray in a Dhoti : Transnationalizing Australian Literature Paul Sharrad , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 39-36)
'India has faced a similar challenge in establishing the serious study of its own writing in English, one made more problematic by the battle not only to overcome ingrained colonial prejudice against that writing as second-hand imitations of British literature, but because of the resistance from nationalist critics championing writing in the autochthonous languages of the subcontinent. The tactical solution amongst academics in Australia has been in part to accept the consolidation of the field in the national context and to look beyond the national to historical complex networks of literary production and circulation under Empire and to current networks of diasporic movements in and out of Australia. Among other things Sharrad shares that the current calibration of research publications in Australia and the allocation of research grants threaten steadily to concentrate resources around a few key international journals and narrow interpretations of the national interest.' (Editor's abstract)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Reconfiguring Australia's Literary Canon : Antipodean Cultural Tectonics Salhia Ben-Messahel , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 34 no. 1 2011; (p. 77-91)
'This paper shows how an Australian community imagined by the European continent has evolved to become more inclusive of otherness, be it in the form of non-Anglo-Australian cultures, Australian regional cultures, or a significant Indigenous culture intimately linked to the land. In this process, which is comparable to tectonic shifts, some Australian authors have attempted, within a 21st-century global village, to map intercultural spaces that reveal a pervasive sense of emptiness and the uncanny.' (Author's abstract)
Is Australian Literature Post-Colonial? Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 1-13)
The author demonstrates 'just a few ways in which Australian literary culture may be read in a post-colonial way, by addressing three critical post-colonial discourses: place, with its attendant principles of boundaries, mapping and naming; language; and history.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Reading Post-Colonial Australia Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 15-37)
Great Expectations Peter Craven , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Author , December vol. 42 no. 3 2010; (p. 6-9)
History and the Novel : Refusing to Be Silent Jo Jones , 2010 single work essay
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 55 no. 2 2010; (p. 36-52)
Argues that Australian historical fiction is important in considering the progress of Aboriginal-white relations.
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

A Tribute to the Short Story Susan Midalia , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indigo , Spring no. 4 2009; (p. 16-24)
‘Susan Midalia argues that there is a ‘belief that the short story is inferior to the novel; for while the novel is regarded as complex, substantial and enduring, the short story tends to be devalued as slight and ephemeral, even superficial. We see this disregard for the short story among publishers, many of whom are prepared to take risks with debut novels, but who typically regard collections of stories by first-time or unknown writers as commercially unviable. Think, too, of the disproportionate number of awards and prizes for novels compared to those offered for collections of stories, and of the paucity of short story writers on the panels of literary festivals. But I want to insist that this generic hierarchy – the privileging of the novel over the short story – is both misplaced and unfortunate. Misplaced, because it misses the point that the two narrative genres are in fact very different from one another; and unfortunate, because it works to prevent readers from enjoying the many and various pleasures afforded by the short story form.’ (p. 16)
Fish Tales : Catches of the Dazed Sara Dowse , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 10 January 2009; (p. 13)

— Review of The Trout Opera Matthew Condon 2007 single work novel ; Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
'Dancing the Old Enlightenment' : Gould's Book of Fish, the Historical Novel and the Postmodern Sublime Jo Jones , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2008; (p. 114-129)
'The strategy that I wish to explore in this analysis of Gould's Book of Fish is the postmodern experimental narrativisation of the colonial past applied to a political critique of the national present. More specifically, through interpreting the novel through Lyotard's discussion of the postmodern sublime and a theory of bodily experience, it is possible to argue that Flanagan employs a postmodern aesthetic as a type of immanent critique in which the postmodern dialectic can be read as an extension of Enlightenment thinking. In the novel the past is shifting and, at least in a positivistic sense, ultimately irretrievable. This signals the notion of history as the postmodern sublime - a space of irretrievable loss and unfulfilled desire at the edges of the margins of history. While history and the colonial past shift and change in the novel, the representations of bodily experience anchor Flanagan's novel in the recognition that real lives, often individual and collective suffering, often motivate postmodern critiques.' (Author's abstract)
Forging Heritage for the Tourist Gaze : Australian history and contemporary representations reviewed Agnes Vogler , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 91 2007; (p. 93-106, notes 189-190)
'This essay argues that tourist culture has continued and refocused postcolonial debates about power over historical representations. I further suggest that Australian literature on the subject of tourism offers a platform from which to contest historical perspectives and review not only accounts of past events, but contemporary representations a well' (93).
Careful Mapping: Cassandra Pybus and Richard Flanagan Redraw Tasmania John Scheckter , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Who Cares? 2007; (p. 107-123)
Putting on the Plum Christopher Tayler , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 31 October vol. 24 no. 21 2002; (p. 26-27)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
[Untitled] Ann-Marie Thomas , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , June no. 6 2002;

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Linnaeus Downunder Frances Devlin-Glass , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 179-184)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : For Malcolm Knox , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : Against Mark Tewfik , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29-30 November 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Re-viewing the Nation : Richard Flanagan's 'Gould's Book of Fish' Norelle Wooley , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Eucalypt , no. 3 2004;

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Fish Tales : Catches of the Dazed Sara Dowse , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 10 January 2009; (p. 13)

— Review of The Trout Opera Matthew Condon 2007 single work novel ; Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Books of the Week Dawn Albinger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 21 October 2012; (p. 37)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Fishy Tale Katharine England , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 6 October 2001; (p. 25)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Journey Into Innocence Helen Elliott , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 6-7 October 2001; (p. 14)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Another Gould, with a Fishy Tale Bronwyn Rivers , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 October 2001; (p. 11)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Something Fishy Going On Peter Craven , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 10 November 2001; (p. 9) Creme de la Phlegm : Unforgettable Australian Reviews 2006; (p. 382-385)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Fin Print Anne Susskind , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 20 November vol. 119 no. 6302 2001; (p. 89)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Sunday Age Book Focus : Gould's Book of Fish : A Novel in Twelve Fish : Week 2 : Discussion Points 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 18 November 2001; (p. 11)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
The Ministry of Fish Brian Matthews , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 235 2001; (p. 41-42)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
The Strange Narrative Density of Tasmania Philip Mead , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Spring no. 87 2001; (p. 15-17)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
So Short, But Thanks for All the Fish Lyle Dunne , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , November no. 218 2001; (p. 34-35)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Learning His Scales James Campbell , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 14 April vol. 107 no. 15 2002; (p. 26)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Trust the Conman Stephen Abell , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 7 June no. 5175 2002; (p. 21)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel
Coming and Going : A Literature of Place - Australian Fiction 2001-2002 Shirley Walker , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 47 no. 2002; (p. 38-51)

— Review of Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish Richard Flanagan 2001 single work novel ; A Child's Book of True Crime Chloe Hooper 2002 single work novel ; Gilgamesh : A Novel Joan London 2001 single work novel ; The City of Sealions Eva Sallis 2002 single work novel ; Cafe Scheherazade Arnold Zable 2001 single work novel ; The Architect : A Tale John Scott 2001 single work novel ; An Innocent Gentleman Elizabeth Jolley 2001 single work novel ; The Fog Garden Marion Halligan 2001 single work novel ; Faith Singer Rosie Scott 2001 single work novel ; The Blind Eye Georgia Blain 2001 single work novel ; The Bone Flute N. A. Bourke 2001 single work novel ; Bitin' Back Vivienne Cleven 2001 single work novel ; Dirt Music Tim Winton 2001 single work novel
Awards Nicholas Birns , 2002 single work column
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 16 no. 1 2002; (p. 74-75)
2002 Australian Literary Society Gold Medal Award 2002 single work column
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 1 no. 2002; (p. 114-115)
Includes the judges report on the winning work.
Book Briefs - Modern Australian Classics & Some 2002 single work column
— Appears in: Blast , Winter no. 47 2002; (p. 13)
Wishing for Modernity : Temporality and Desire in Gould's Book of Fish Jesse Shipway , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 43-53)
Shipway's article examines Flanagan's representation of Tasmanian versions of history and modernity in Gould's Book of Fish. As one of the recurring motifs in Flanagan's writing is 'the impoverishment of the Tasmanian present, a state of affairs both enacted by, and embodied in, a failed modernity', his fiction poses the question: 'how are we to summon up hope for Tasmania's future, when its past is so overwhelmingly full of defeat?'. Shipways argues that the answer proposed in the novel is 'to radically fictionalise that past, and to imbue it with the residue of collective longing left over from the project of hydro-electrification that was aborted after the Franklin River conflicts of the early 1980s' (43). 'In Gould's Book of Fish, Richard Flanagan returns to the time of Tasmania's first modernity in order to realise his hopes and ambitions for another modernity that is yet to come. The tragic-comic failure of that fictional modernisation embodies the ambivalence he feels about the real history of Tasmanian modernity' (44).
Cover Stories Rebecca Lancashire , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 17 July 2004; (p. 1-2)
Australian publishers believe buyers are influenced by the design and colour of book covers.
Books and Covers : Reflections on Some Recent Australian Novels Elizabeth Webby , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 29 no. 2003; (p. 79-86)
Compares the covers of Australian, American and English editions of recent Australian novels, including three novels short-listed for the 2002 Miles Franklin Award.
Disrupting the Past: Magical Realism and Historical Revision in Australian Fiction Kate Hall , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sharing Spaces : Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Responses to Story, Country and Rights 2006; (p. 69-85)
Uneasy Writer Catherine Keenan , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: Good Weekend , 21 October 2006; (p. 73, 75-76)
'This sad pastiche' : Texts and Contexts in Richard Flanagan's Gould's Book of Fish Xavier Pons , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 28 no. 1 2005; (p. 64-76)
'Relax and Enjoy the Show' : Circensian Animal Spaces in Australian and Latin American Magical Realist Fiction Tanja Schwalm , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 41 no. 3 2006; (p. 83-102)
'The Authority of Words' : History and Fiction in Richard Flanagan's 'Gould's Book of Fish.' Xavier Pons , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Dislocations 2006; (p. 173-183)
Pons looks at the interplay of history and fiction in Gould's Book of Fish, 'with fiction compensating for the lies and omissions of history, and history vouching for the relevance of fiction' (183).
Of Humans, Pigs, Fish, and Apes: The Literary Motif of Human-Animal Metamorphosis and Its Multiple Functions in Contemporary Fiction Marion Gymnich , Alexandre Segao Costa , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Esprit Createur , Summer vol. 46 no. 2 2006; (p. 68-88)
Forging Heritage for the Tourist Gaze : Australian history and contemporary representations reviewed Agnes Vogler , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 91 2007; (p. 93-106, notes 189-190)
'This essay argues that tourist culture has continued and refocused postcolonial debates about power over historical representations. I further suggest that Australian literature on the subject of tourism offers a platform from which to contest historical perspectives and review not only accounts of past events, but contemporary representations a well' (93).
Sex Encounters of the Strange Kind : Forms of Postcolonial Discourse in Three Australian Novels Xavier Pons , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 29 no. 1 2006; (p. 47-58) Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 197-210)
'The paper focuses on scenes from three Australian novels ... . Through an analysis of the representation of sexual intercourse by the three novelists, the paper highlights the sense of strangeness associated with the postcolonial, born out of the colonists' feeling that they do not truly belong to their adopted land and must force themselves upon it. Sex, which can be an expression of love, here degenerates into lust, violence or parody. It becomes an expression of the unnerving alienation which overcomes Europeans in a postcolonial context. Sex here as a struggle for domination is a paradigm of the perverted human relations which are inherent in the postcolonial condition. In his own fashion, and through a variety of narrative modes, each of the three (male) novelists illustrates the unbearable strangeness of being in an alien land.' (47)
Set Adrift: Identity and the Postcolonial Present in Gould's Book of Fish Zach Weir , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 1 no. 2 2005;
'This article presents a critical examination of the metafictional devices used by Richard Flanagan in developing a pointed fictional critique of postcolonial Tasmania in his novel Gould's Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish. Highlights Flanagan's insistence on developing and maintaining the postcolonial present as a place of literary intervention.' -- From the journal.
'Dancing the Old Enlightenment' : Gould's Book of Fish, the Historical Novel and the Postmodern Sublime Jo Jones , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2008; (p. 114-129)
'The strategy that I wish to explore in this analysis of Gould's Book of Fish is the postmodern experimental narrativisation of the colonial past applied to a political critique of the national present. More specifically, through interpreting the novel through Lyotard's discussion of the postmodern sublime and a theory of bodily experience, it is possible to argue that Flanagan employs a postmodern aesthetic as a type of immanent critique in which the postmodern dialectic can be read as an extension of Enlightenment thinking. In the novel the past is shifting and, at least in a positivistic sense, ultimately irretrievable. This signals the notion of history as the postmodern sublime - a space of irretrievable loss and unfulfilled desire at the edges of the margins of history. While history and the colonial past shift and change in the novel, the representations of bodily experience anchor Flanagan's novel in the recognition that real lives, often individual and collective suffering, often motivate postmodern critiques.' (Author's abstract)
A Haunted Land John McLaren , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1&2 2005; (p. 139-153)
'Since the nineteenth century, Australian art and writing has had a double vision of the country, as a sunny land of opportunity, and as a place of loneliness and loss. [...] Recent fiction by white writers has, like Lawson, shown an awareness of the strangeness of the land, but it locates this strangeness more directly in the brutality and defeats of settlement. The sufferings of both settlers and of those they violently displaced continue to haunt their successors' (139). The paper examines the nature of this haunting in recent novels by white Australian writers.
Careful Mapping: Cassandra Pybus and Richard Flanagan Redraw Tasmania John Scheckter , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Who Cares? 2007; (p. 107-123)
Is Australian Literature Post-Colonial? Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 1-13)
The author demonstrates 'just a few ways in which Australian literary culture may be read in a post-colonial way, by addressing three critical post-colonial discourses: place, with its attendant principles of boundaries, mapping and naming; language; and history.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Reading Post-Colonial Australia Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 15-37)
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