y The Gingko Tree single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1984 1984
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Gingko Tree tells the story of an Italian family who were early settlers in Australia. The heroine, Diana de Fluti Ashton, is of the fourth generation born in the new country. Living an almost idyllic life in the home that has passed down through three generations, she is suddenly awakened to suffering through the illness of her husband. The coming into her life of Dr Hinde has a dramatic effect on her whole growth of consciousness and adaptation.' (Source: back cover)

Notes

  • Epigraph: 'Trees are the earth's endless effort to speak to the listening heaven.' (Rabindranath Tagore)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y Interview with Irene Rix Weaver, Jungian Analyst and Author Barbara Blackman (interviewer), 1983 Z1474235 1983 single work interview Rix Weaver speaks on her childhood and education in Western Australia; family background; married life; involvement in the Christian Science Church; first interest in Jung; her work as a hand-writing analyst; her course at the Institute of Zurich; her practice in Australia as a Jungian analyst and as a trainer of analysts; The Analytical Psychology Club (Jung Club); the International Association of Analytical Psychologists; study centre at Karnak; views on marriage, sex roles, religion and dreams; and her novel The Gingko Tree. Also includes an extract of a lecture by Weaver, an example of one of her dreams and a description of her by Diane Cilento (q.v.). (Source: LibrariesAustralia)
y Interview with Irene Rix Weaver, Jungian Analyst and Author Barbara Blackman (interviewer), 1983 Z1474235 1983 single work interview Rix Weaver speaks on her childhood and education in Western Australia; family background; married life; involvement in the Christian Science Church; first interest in Jung; her work as a hand-writing analyst; her course at the Institute of Zurich; her practice in Australia as a Jungian analyst and as a trainer of analysts; The Analytical Psychology Club (Jung Club); the International Association of Analytical Psychologists; study centre at Karnak; views on marriage, sex roles, religion and dreams; and her novel The Gingko Tree. Also includes an extract of a lecture by Weaver, an example of one of her dreams and a description of her by Diane Cilento (q.v.). (Source: LibrariesAustralia)
Last amended 12 Mar 2008 16:45:11
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