y Not Counting the Cost single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1895 1895
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Notes

  • Epigraph: 'A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity' (Proverbs).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Richard Bentley , 1895 .
      Extent: 3 vol.p.
      Note/s:
      • 'One of the last novels to be published in this form [three volumes], a vogue which had in fact run its course and was no longer in demand from libraries' (Patricia Clarke Tasma: The Life of Jessie Couvreur 1994, p.148).

Works about this Work

Trouble in Bohemia: The Belle Epoque Novels of Tasma, 1891 and 1895 Rosemary Lancaster , 2008 single work biography
— Appears in: Je Suis Australienne: Remarkable Women in France, 1880-1945 2008; (p. 30-57)
Hobart and 'Home' in Tasma and Mrs Humphry Ward Margaret Harris , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century 2001; (p. [135]-144)
Issues of imperialism and identity in the fiction of Tasma and in Mrs Humphry Ward's colonial novel Canadian Born.
Tasma – A Woman Novelist of Colonial Australia – and ‘Continental Men’ Patricia A. Clancy , 2001 single work bibliography
— Appears in: Explorations : A Journal of French-Australian Connections , June no. 30 2001; (p. 21-32)
'Patricia Clancy discusses the life and work of Jesse Catherine Huybers alias Tasma, born 1848 in London who immigrated with her family to Hobart in 1852. Her first marriage to Charles Fraser was an unhappy one and became an important theme in her novels where she contrasted the spendthrift and philandering of Australian men to the sophistication of their European counterparts. After her divorce, she lived in Europe where she married the Belgian politician Auguste Couvreur. Although she never returned to Australia, her novels, which met with some success, are mostly set in the antipodes. After the death of her second husband Tasma took his place as the Brussels correspondent of the London Times until her death in 1897.' (Author's abstract)
y Tasma : The Life of Jessie Couvreur Patricia Clarke , St Leonards : Allen and Unwin , 1994 Z468043 1994 single work biography
The Writing of Tasma, the Work of Jessie Couvreur Margaret Harris , 1988 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: A Bright and Fiery Troop : Australian Women Writers of the Nineteenth Century 1988; (p. 165-182)
Harris discusses the life and works of Jessie Couvreur and argues that the Australianness of her fiction is inextricable from the dramatisation of the woman question. But, while autobiographical elements can be found, Harris stresses that the novels are much more complicated than simple self-justification or therapy because female characters are not readily exonerated. The popularity of Couvreur's fiction, however, was achieved by the successful transplantation of familiar character types and situations from other nineteenth century fiction to the unfamiliar Australian setting.
Hobart and 'Home' in Tasma and Mrs Humphry Ward Margaret Harris , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century 2001; (p. [135]-144)
Issues of imperialism and identity in the fiction of Tasma and in Mrs Humphry Ward's colonial novel Canadian Born.
Trouble in Bohemia: The Belle Epoque Novels of Tasma, 1891 and 1895 Rosemary Lancaster , 2008 single work biography
— Appears in: Je Suis Australienne: Remarkable Women in France, 1880-1945 2008; (p. 30-57)
Tasma – A Woman Novelist of Colonial Australia – and ‘Continental Men’ Patricia A. Clancy , 2001 single work bibliography
— Appears in: Explorations : A Journal of French-Australian Connections , June no. 30 2001; (p. 21-32)
'Patricia Clancy discusses the life and work of Jesse Catherine Huybers alias Tasma, born 1848 in London who immigrated with her family to Hobart in 1852. Her first marriage to Charles Fraser was an unhappy one and became an important theme in her novels where she contrasted the spendthrift and philandering of Australian men to the sophistication of their European counterparts. After her divorce, she lived in Europe where she married the Belgian politician Auguste Couvreur. Although she never returned to Australia, her novels, which met with some success, are mostly set in the antipodes. After the death of her second husband Tasma took his place as the Brussels correspondent of the London Times until her death in 1897.' (Author's abstract)
y Tasma : The Life of Jessie Couvreur Patricia Clarke , St Leonards : Allen and Unwin , 1994 Z468043 1994 single work biography
The Writing of Tasma, the Work of Jessie Couvreur Margaret Harris , 1988 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: A Bright and Fiery Troop : Australian Women Writers of the Nineteenth Century 1988; (p. 165-182)
Harris discusses the life and works of Jessie Couvreur and argues that the Australianness of her fiction is inextricable from the dramatisation of the woman question. But, while autobiographical elements can be found, Harris stresses that the novels are much more complicated than simple self-justification or therapy because female characters are not readily exonerated. The popularity of Couvreur's fiction, however, was achieved by the successful transplantation of familiar character types and situations from other nineteenth century fiction to the unfamiliar Australian setting.
Last amended 13 Apr 2012 15:17:41
Subjects:
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • Paris,
    c
    France,
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • Hobart, Southeast Tasmania, Tasmania,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X