Issue Details: First known date: 1842; Latest issue indexed: 2016 1842
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y The Sydney Morning Herald 8 December 2016 10483245 2016 newspaper issue
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y The Sydney Morning Herald 28 November 2016 10454218 2016 newspaper issue

Notes

  • An outline of the Sydney Morning Herald's history (including its origins as the Sydney Herald) and the major events reported by the newspaper can be found at: http://www.smh.com.au/aboutsmh/index.html

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1842
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Charles Kemp and John Fairfax , 1842- .
      Link: Web resource Digital copy of print publication via Australian Newspapers (AN) Service.
      Note/s:
      • Digitised issues available Australian Newspapers (AN) Service for the period 1 August 1842 - 31 December 1954.
      • Digitised issues are also available via the Google News Archive for the period 1 August 1842 to 31 December 1989: http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=lL5f5cZgq8MC&dat=18670101&b_mode=2&hl=en (Correct as at 30/04/2013)

Works about this Work

Domesticating Cosmopolitanism : Charmian Clift's Women's Column in the Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne Herald in the 1960s Tanja Luckins , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , December vol. 11 no. 3 2014; (p. 97-115)
'When novelist Charmian Clift returned to Australia in 1964 after 14 years in England and Greece, she was commissioned to write a women's column in the Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne Herald. Her topics ranged widely, from food and drink, migrants and hospitality, famine and peace, children and religion, pop music and Aborigines to travel and housewives. By all accounts Clift struck a chord with her readers, her feel for connecting the vagaries of everyday life with historical and global events and social shifts made hers a distinctive voice in the daily press. This article explores the cosmopolitan outlook of Clift's newspaper column: a world of hospitality and travel based on a common humanity, a perspective that neither feared nor favoured class, caste and colour, all the while not shying away from criticisms of the moral ambiguities of a sophisticated worldliness. It argues that Clift's cosmopolitan perspective offered women a moral space that circumscribed local conditions. The article adds to an emerging body of knowledge on the gendered dimensions of cosmopolitanism and seeks to understand what kind of cosmopolitan world for women existed in 1960s Australia.' (Publication abstract)
y Pardon Me for Mentioning... : Unpublished Letters from the Age and the Sydney Morning Herald Alex Kaplan (editor), Catharine Munro (editor), Julie Lewis (editor), Sydney : Allen and Unwin , 2013 6452913 2013 single work correspondence
Journalism's Changing to Stay the Same 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23-24 June 2012; (p. 19)
The Sydney Morning Herald's editorial writer comments on changes in the newspaper print publishing environment and the decision by Fairfax to move to a tabloid, rather than a broadsheet, format from early 2013.
Unmatched Prose and an Eye for the Moment: Marr Departs Damien Murphy , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 14-15 July 2012; (p. 3)
Damien Murphy reports that 'the Heralds pre-eminent senior writer David Marr chose the eve of his 65th birthday to resign from the newspaper'. Interspersed with other work, Marr's career with the Sydney Morning Herald spanned more than five decades.
Herald Appoints First Female Editor 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 11 January 2011; (p. 4)
Herald Appoints First Woman Editor in Its 180-Year History Tim Dick , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 11 January 2011; (p. 2)
The Journal of Record Lost in Space, and Time Judy Prisk , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 October 2011; (p. 17)
Outlaw Culture : Bushrangers in the Sydney Morning Herald Bruce Tranter , Jed Donoghue , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'The myths surrounding rural outlaws and social bandits are important elements of cultural identity in many urban and industrialised nations, with the image of Australian bushranger Ned Kelly even projected to a global audience during the opening ceremony of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Analysis of Sydney Morning Herald articles from 1987 to 2004 confirms that Ned Kelly appears more often than all other bushrangers combined. Journalists tapping the wellspring of the Kelly myth have embellished his legend and introduced him to new generations of Australians. However, he is less likely than other bushrangers to appear in historical pieces and rarely the central focus of articles. Kelly the 'hero' is associated with the visual arts and literature, while Kelly the 'outlaw' is juxtaposed with rapacious banks and rogue politicians. Long after his death, the famous bushranger is enshrined in Australian mythology through regular media exposure, ensuring his position as a cultural symbol of Australia.' (Author's abstract)
Fight Is On as Papers get Facelifts Sally Jackson , 2009 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 31 August 2009; (p. 33)
In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

The Small Picture Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 281 2006; (p. 8)
y The Voice of the Thunderer : Journalism of H. G. Kippax H. G. Kippax , Harry Payne Heseltine (editor), Canberra : Pandanus Books , 2006 Z1275436 2006 selected work prose This fascinating collection of reporting and comment by H. G. Kippax offers a detailed eye-witness picture of Australia and the world over 40 years. Kippax wrote for the Sydney Morning Herald from 1938 to 1983... and became best known as a fine theatre and drama critic. His Editorials from the Herald from the late 1950s to the early 80s covered subjects as diverse as city planning, censorship, the Sydney Opera House, the Melbourne Cup and Anzac Day. The Voice of the Thunderer highlights both the breadth of Kippax's interests and the felicity of his prose style - always lucid and well-informed; plain-spoken, pungent, evocative by turns, as his subjects required. It reveals him as one of Australia's most versatile and distinguished print journalists. (Backcover)
The Voice of the Thunderer : Introduction Harry Payne Heseltine , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: The Voice of the Thunderer : Journalism of H. G. Kippax 2006; (p. [1]-37)
y The Big Picture : Diary of a Nation Max Prisk (editor), Tony Stephens (editor), Michael Bowers (editor), Milsons Point : Doubleday Australia , 2005 Z1230331 2005 anthology prose
'Having It All' or 'Had Enough'? Blaming Feminism in the 'Age' and the 'Sydney Morning Herald', 1980-2004 Natasha Campo , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 84 2005; (p. 63-72)
y The Usefulness of John West : Dissent and Difference in the Australian Colonies Patricia Fitzgerald Ratcliff , Launceston : Albernian Press , 2003 Z1045204 2003 single work biography
y Two Hundred Years of Sydney Newspapers : A Short History Victor Isaacs , Rod Kirkpatrick , North Richmond : Rural Press , 2003 Z1205070 2003 single work criticism 'This booklet ... has been produced to mark the bicentenary of publication of the first Australian newspaper, the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, on 5 March 1803 and to provide a souvenir for those attending the Australian Newspaper Press Bicentenary Symposium at the State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, on 1 March 2003.
Rolling Column : Reviewing Space in the Press Gerard Windsor , 1998 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 201 1998; (p. 13)
Charmian Clift and the 'Sydney Morning Herald' Sharyn Pearce , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Shameless Scribblers : Australian Women's Journalism 1880-1995 1998; (p. 149 -184)
y The Usefulness of John West : Dissent and Difference in the Australian Colonies Patricia Fitzgerald Ratcliff , Launceston : Albernian Press , 2003 Z1045204 2003 single work biography
y Conversation with Margaret Jones Hazel de Berg (interviewer), 1973 Z1110029 1973 single work interview Jones speaks of her work as a journalist for the Sydney Morning Herald ; about leaving for Peking and her prospects for gathering news ; the editorial policies of the Sydney Morning Herald ; she speaks about feature writing ; the techniques she employs when interviewing ; about her reasons for wanting to become a journalist ; she then speaks of her childhood.
y Conversation with Margaret Jones Hazel de Berg (interviewer), 1976 Z1110042 1976 single work interview Jones speaks of her two year stay in Peking as correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald ; of the controlled nature of news sources in China ; the amount of contact allowed with Chinese nationals during this period ; difficulties encountered when gathering news ; Chinese social customs ; Chinese urban workers and the peasants ; her impressions of Australia on her return.
y Interview with Margaret Jones, Writer Ann Turner (interviewer), 1994 Z1110049 1994 single work interview Jones talks about her trip to China in 1973 and then compares it with her trip in 1986. She then talks about her novel, The Confucius Enigma. Jones then compares the situation in 1974 and 1975 when one couldn't talk to ordinary Chinese to 1986 when it was possible. Jones also talks about the attitude of Chinese officials to journalists and attempts by Russians to get information from her about the situation in China. She also talks about The Smiling Buddha, a novel about Cambodia and her meetings with Prince Sihanouk. Jones also discusses writing Thatcher's Kingdom and a just completed novel about the return of art treasures from England to Greece. She is currently writing short stories. Jones then talks about her move from journalism to fiction writing; early days with the ABC, Mirror and Sydney Morning Herald (SMH); working in London and New York; discrimination against women journalists and her position as the first woman foreign editor of SMH and the changed situation today.
y Two Hundred Years of Sydney Newspapers : A Short History Victor Isaacs , Rod Kirkpatrick , North Richmond : Rural Press , 2003 Z1205070 2003 single work criticism 'This booklet ... has been produced to mark the bicentenary of publication of the first Australian newspaper, the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, on 5 March 1803 and to provide a souvenir for those attending the Australian Newspaper Press Bicentenary Symposium at the State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, on 1 March 2003.
y The Big Picture : Diary of a Nation Max Prisk (editor), Tony Stephens (editor), Michael Bowers (editor), Milsons Point : Doubleday Australia , 2005 Z1230331 2005 anthology prose
'Having It All' or 'Had Enough'? Blaming Feminism in the 'Age' and the 'Sydney Morning Herald', 1980-2004 Natasha Campo , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 84 2005; (p. 63-72)
The Small Picture Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 281 2006; (p. 8)
y The Voice of the Thunderer : Journalism of H. G. Kippax H. G. Kippax , Harry Payne Heseltine (editor), Canberra : Pandanus Books , 2006 Z1275436 2006 selected work prose This fascinating collection of reporting and comment by H. G. Kippax offers a detailed eye-witness picture of Australia and the world over 40 years. Kippax wrote for the Sydney Morning Herald from 1938 to 1983... and became best known as a fine theatre and drama critic. His Editorials from the Herald from the late 1950s to the early 80s covered subjects as diverse as city planning, censorship, the Sydney Opera House, the Melbourne Cup and Anzac Day. The Voice of the Thunderer highlights both the breadth of Kippax's interests and the felicity of his prose style - always lucid and well-informed; plain-spoken, pungent, evocative by turns, as his subjects required. It reveals him as one of Australia's most versatile and distinguished print journalists. (Backcover)
The Voice of the Thunderer : Introduction Harry Payne Heseltine , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: The Voice of the Thunderer : Journalism of H. G. Kippax 2006; (p. [1]-37)
The Colonial Newspapers i "Though my mind is contracted, my body extended", 1845 single work poetry satire
— Appears in: The Atlas , 26 April vol. 1 no. 22 1845; (p. 260)
A letter in verse form, supposedly from the editor of the Sydney Morning Herald to the governor, Sir George Gipps. The editor offers the view that the Atlas newspaper should be crushed for supporting the cause of the squatter. (Gipps and the Sydney Morning Herald were viewed as opposing the squatter's cause.)
The Atlas State Trials No.2 : Court of Areopagus 1845 single work column satire
— Appears in: The Atlas , 25 January vol. 1 no. 9 1845; (p. 98-99)
Mesmeric Phenomenon i "As when the leader of a Coach falls ill", 1845 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Atlas , 29 March vol. 1 no. 18 1845; (p. 205)
This poem uses the imagery of a cart-horse replacing the leader in pulling a coach. The poem alludes to the competition offered to the Sydney Morning Herald by the advent of the Atlas.
Untitled 1845 single work column
— Appears in: The Atlas , 29 March vol. 1 no. 18 1845; (p. 205-206)
The writer for the Atlas argues that the presence of the weekly Atlas has led to a raising of the standards at the daily Sydney Morning Herald and an improvement in the daily's coverage of events in New South Wales.
Untitled 1845 single work correspondence satire
— Appears in: The Atlas , 8 November vol. 1 no. 50 1845; (p. 598)
A Steamboat Incident 1847 single work prose humour
— Appears in: The Atlas , 27 March vol. 3 no. 122 1847; (p. 149)
Mr Bodenham and the Atlas 1847 single work column
— Appears in: The Atlas , 3 April vol. 3 no. 123 1847; (p. 158)
A brief report on a legal investigation, requested by Mr Bodenham, into the proprietor of the Atlas. The claim was in relation to 'some absurb poetry, which crept into our columns a few weeks since'.
Punch's State Trials : Before His Honor Mr. Justice Therry 1847 single work prose satire
— Appears in: The Atlas , 19 June vol. 3 no. 134 1847; (p. 300)
In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

ISSN: 1322-0675
ISSN: 1327-5526
ISSN: 1322-0683
ISSN: 0312-6315
ISSN: 1326-4745
Frequency:
Daily (Monday - Saturday)
Range:
Vol.14 no. 1623 (1 August 1842) -
Continues:
Continues the Sydney Herald vol. 1 no.1 (Monday, 18 April 1831) - vol.14 no.1622 (July 1842)
Supplement:
Includes supplements
Graphics:
illus.
Advertising:
Includes advertising
Note:
Selections of news items and feature columns of some issues available in an electronic version via the Internet at: http://www.smh.com.au/
Note:
In June 2012, Fairfax announced that the size of The Sydney Morning Herald would change from broadsheet to 'compact' (tabloid) size as of 4 March 2013 for Monday to Friday issues.
Note:
The Sun-Herald, published on Sundays, complements The Sydney Morning Herald's Monday to Saturday issues.

Has serialised

Star Struck, Paul Thomas , 1999-2000 single work novel crime
The Ship of Ice, Rosemary Dobson , 1947 single work drama poetry
The Charge Is Murder!, J. M. Spender , 1933 single work novel crime detective
The Woman at Jingera, Don Edwards , 1948 single work novel
Missing Cuffley, Peter Temple , 2003 single work short story detective
Paying the Price, Barry Maitland , 2002 single work short story crime
Beat Not the Bones, Charlotte Jay , 1952 single work novel crime

'Sudden, violent death enshrouded the island port of Marapai. The kind of death known only to voodoo cults and savages. On this island Europeans lost their civilization, their innocence–and their sanity. And famed anthropologist David Warwick lost his life. Rumors whispered suicide. But the rumors were lies. Everyone lied to haunted Emma Warwick, who suspected murder and set out to trap a killer–only to discover the very roots of terror!'

Source: Back cover blurb (Avon edition).

Dark Pool Island, Mavis Thorpe Clark , 1936 single work children's fiction children's

'A first-rate adventure yarn telling of the exploits of some of the boys at Gilham School in solving the mystery surrounding the Dark Pool Island in their school grounds.'

Source:

'It's Easy to Make it a Book Christmas', Courier-Mail, 10 December 1949, p.2.

The Eternal Lure, 'William Hatfield' , 1935 single work novel

A story of Lasseter's Reef.

Rosenthal, E. O. Schlunke , 1939 single work novel
The Ultimate Story 2011, Jen Storer , Sherryl Clark , Dave Hackett , Jodie Turnbull , Billy Robertson , Justin D'Ath , Christina Tregenza , Ben Scherf , 2011 single work children's fiction children's The Sun-Herald MS Readathon Ultimate Story 2011 The Dummy's Gaze
The Climate of Courage, Jon Cleary , 1953 single work novel war literature

'Fictionalised account of part of the Kokoda Trail battles between Australian and Japanese troops in 1942.

Set during the Second World War, The Climate of Courage involves a group of Australian soldiers who have returned from service in the Middle East. The novel is broken up into two parts and follows the soldiers from their leave in Sydney, where they engage in various romances and witness the famous submarine attack on Sydney, to their taking part in a patrol during the New Guinea Campaign.

'The book is partly based on Jon Cleary’s own experiences of the war.' (Publication summary)

Death of a Swagman, Arthur W. Upfield , 1945 single work novel crime detective mystery
Lost Haven, Kylie Tennant , 1946 single work novel
The Earth Cries Out, Harold C. Wells , 1948-1949 single work novel
Death of a Lake, Arthur W. Upfield , 1954 single work novel crime detective mystery
The Harp in the South, Ruth Park , 1948 single work novel
Bim, Kay Glasson Taylor , 1946 single work novel romance
Orphaned 'tomboy' Bim lives on her guardian's station to which she is the heir. Her aunt - an English Duchess - takes her to the city but eventually returns to the station to marry Bim's guardian.
Soil of Wyoona, A. J. Masman , 1947 single work novel historical fiction
'John Nixon, scapegoat of a prosperous Yorkshire family, is banished to Sydney in 1827 with 1,000 pounds in his pocket. Beyond Bathurst, in the unexplored interior, he lays claim to land on which to raise sheep and cattle....A harsh and lurid picture the author presents-yet one that does not suggest any straining after effects. Life is mostly at subsistence level and very raw; there are bouts of drinking, outbursts of lust and murder; man and beast are trampled to death or drowned in a stampede to the river after drought....' Publisher's blurb opposite title page.
The Winds Are Still, John Hetherington , 1947 single work novel war literature
Last amended 5 Mar 2015 15:21:47
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