Courtesy of www.collectingbooks andmagazines.com
Date: 1936-1955 Note: Editors succeeding Greenop have not been identified.
Date: 1969-1971
Issue Details: First known date: 1936; Latest issue indexed: 1974 1936
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Latest Issues

y Man : Australian Magazine for Men May 1974 Z1692723 1974 periodical issue
y Man : Australian Magazine for Men April 1974 Z1690471 1974 periodical issue
y Man : Australian Magazine for Men vol. 74 no. 4 October 1973 Z1677955 1973 periodical issue
y Man : Australian Magazine for Men vol. 73 no. 4 March 1973 Z1677932 1973 periodical issue
y Man : Australian Magazine for Men December 1973 Z1699512 1973 periodical issue

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Modelled on the American Esquire magazine, Man began publication in 1936. An unapologetic magazine for men, it tested the borders of acceptable taste with suggestive cartoons, portraying the sexual exploits of men with a variety of female character-types. This feature endured throughout the magazine's history, but competition from more explicit magazines such as Penthouse and Playboy contributed to the demise of Man in the early 1970s.

While not aiming for literary quality, Man published many short stories and some poetry. A 1938 editorial reported that between four and five hundred manuscripts were received each month. The magazine expected stories to be 'slanted for masculine interests', but would provide some editorial enhancement if necessary. In addition to the many amateur writers who contributed to Man, writers such as Vance Palmer, E. V. Timms, Will Lawson, R. Carson Gold, J. M. H. Abbott, Ruth Park and Dal Stivens also appeared, largely adhering to the magazine's prescribed formulas.

Another literary feature of Man was the 'magazine within a magazine' called 'Australianasia'. Edited by Ion Idriess, this section published essays and adventure fiction set in places like the Australian Outback or in the South Seas. Idriess contributed many of these, but contributions were also received from Frank Clune, Francis Birtles, Jack Hides, George Farwell, Will Lawson, Robert Kaleski and a wide variety of amateur writers.

While Man asserted an Australian attitude in early issues, its later contents often reflected the adoption of language and commercial attitudes of the United States. In his study of Man, Richard White demonstrates how Man 'exhibits an image of the Australian Male which struggled to reconcile an Australian identity with modern demands'.

Notes

  • RANGE: 1936-1974
  • FREQUENCY: Monthly
  • SIZE: 28cm

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1936

Works about this Work

y Man Magazine : The Australian Publishing Icon Z1783834 website Site contains brief history of the magazine, its writers and its editors together with images of covers.
Man's Man : Representations of Australian Post-war Masculinity in Man Magazine Chelsea Barnett , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , July vol. 39 no. 2 2015; (p. 151-169)

'This article examines the representation of masculinity in Man, a men’s magazine, in post-war Australia. While the notion of the “sleepy 1950s” has implied a period of social conservatism and gender stability, the representation of (and commentary on) men’s social, cultural and familial worlds in Man tells a rather different story. In a period in which Menzies’s breadwinner masculinity idealised work and familial life as the source of men’s satisfaction (and civilised society more broadly), Man positioned its imagined reader as desperately unhappy and frustrated by the confines of suburban life and marriage. There were limits, however, to the generosity of this critique. While trying to provide Australian men with an escape from the rigid confines of hegemonic masculinity, Man remained attached to a near-misogynist attitude to women. The distress and anguish of men, in this case, became another way to restrict the lives and choices of women.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

War's Other Bombshells James Cockington , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 24 November 2010; (p. 13)
A Lost Australian Story : 'Man' in the 1930s Victoria Kuttainen , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 36 no. 2009; (p. 161-180)
Examines the often-overlooked array of short stories published in 'non-nationalist, lower brow, mainstream publications which have also played a formative role in Australian writing and culture', with a focus on the publications in Man during the interwar years.
y 'Fair Dinkum Personal Grooming' : Male Beauty Culture and Men's Magazines in the Twentieth Century Jennifer Burton , Brisbane : 2008 Z1828834 2008 single work thesis Burton analyses the representation of grooming in Australian men's lifestyle magazines to explore the emergence of new masculine subjectivities constructed around narcissism and the adoption of previously feminine-coded products and practices which may indicate important shifts in the cultural meanings of Australian masculinity. However, in order to talk about 'new' subjectivities and 'shifts' in masculine behaviours and cultural ideals, then it is imperative to demonstrate 'old' practices and ideologies, and so while the thesis is concerned with discourses of grooming and models of masculinity presented in the new genre of men's lifestyle titles which appeared on the Australian market in the late 1990s, it frames this discussion with detailed analyses of previously unexplored Australian men's general interest magazines from the 1930s ... This thesis is centrally concerned with the role of men's lifestyle magazines and magazine representations of masculinity in the 'cultural economy' of mediated male grooming cultures.
(From author's abstract)
The Importance of Being Man Richard White , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Popular Culture 1979; (p. 145-168)
Untitled L. A. Sigsworth , 1938 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 24 March 1938; (p. 12)

— Review of Man : Australian Magazine for Men 1936 periodical (99 issues)
Untitled L. A. Sigsworth , 1938 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 24 March 1938; (p. 12)

— Review of Man : Australian Magazine for Men 1936 periodical (99 issues)
The Importance of Being Man Richard White , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Popular Culture 1979; (p. 145-168)
A Lost Australian Story : 'Man' in the 1930s Victoria Kuttainen , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 36 no. 2009; (p. 161-180)
Examines the often-overlooked array of short stories published in 'non-nationalist, lower brow, mainstream publications which have also played a formative role in Australian writing and culture', with a focus on the publications in Man during the interwar years.
War's Other Bombshells James Cockington , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 24 November 2010; (p. 13)
y Man Magazine : The Australian Publishing Icon Z1783834 website Site contains brief history of the magazine, its writers and its editors together with images of covers.
y 'Fair Dinkum Personal Grooming' : Male Beauty Culture and Men's Magazines in the Twentieth Century Jennifer Burton , Brisbane : 2008 Z1828834 2008 single work thesis Burton analyses the representation of grooming in Australian men's lifestyle magazines to explore the emergence of new masculine subjectivities constructed around narcissism and the adoption of previously feminine-coded products and practices which may indicate important shifts in the cultural meanings of Australian masculinity. However, in order to talk about 'new' subjectivities and 'shifts' in masculine behaviours and cultural ideals, then it is imperative to demonstrate 'old' practices and ideologies, and so while the thesis is concerned with discourses of grooming and models of masculinity presented in the new genre of men's lifestyle titles which appeared on the Australian market in the late 1990s, it frames this discussion with detailed analyses of previously unexplored Australian men's general interest magazines from the 1930s ... This thesis is centrally concerned with the role of men's lifestyle magazines and magazine representations of masculinity in the 'cultural economy' of mediated male grooming cultures.
(From author's abstract)
Man's Man : Representations of Australian Post-war Masculinity in Man Magazine Chelsea Barnett , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , July vol. 39 no. 2 2015; (p. 151-169)

'This article examines the representation of masculinity in Man, a men’s magazine, in post-war Australia. While the notion of the “sleepy 1950s” has implied a period of social conservatism and gender stability, the representation of (and commentary on) men’s social, cultural and familial worlds in Man tells a rather different story. In a period in which Menzies’s breadwinner masculinity idealised work and familial life as the source of men’s satisfaction (and civilised society more broadly), Man positioned its imagined reader as desperately unhappy and frustrated by the confines of suburban life and marriage. There were limits, however, to the generosity of this critique. While trying to provide Australian men with an escape from the rigid confines of hegemonic masculinity, Man remained attached to a near-misogynist attitude to women. The distress and anguish of men, in this case, became another way to restrict the lives and choices of women.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Last amended 1 Dec 2011 10:56:30
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