8092750463378676563.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
2718029148954001120.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
8820824568946335745.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
7457721537431919298.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
y Quarantine single work   novel   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992 1992
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'It's late in the 21st century and bioengineering is now so common that people are able to modify their minds in any way they wish. It is an era which has been shaped by information systems so vast that security, in any form, is easily breached. Now, you can be whatever you want to be, and do whatever you want to do. On Earth anyway. One night, thirty three years ago, the stars went out. 'The Bubble' - a perfect sphere centred on the sun - appeared in the sky, isolating the solar system from the rest of the universe. For thirty-three years, humanity has lived with the religious cults and terrorism which spawned in the wake of the darkness. We are now alone. Humanity has been cut off: quarantined.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Artarmon, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Legend , 1992 .
      8092750463378676563.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 219p.p.
      ISBN: 0712698701, 0712653473
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperPrism , 1995 .
      2718029148954001120.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 280p.p.
      ISBN: 0061054232
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Millennium , 1999 .
      8820824568946335745.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 256p.
      ISBN: 1857985907; 9781857985900
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Gollancz , 2008 .
      7457721537431919298.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 251p.
      Limited edition info: FOS Worldcat
      ISBN: 0575081724; 9780575081727
Alternative title: Quarantane: Science-fiction
Language: German
    • Bergisch Gladbach,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bastei Lübbe , 1993 .
      5155197280129893712.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 379p.

Works about this Work

Greg Egan's Quarantine and Teranesia : Contributions to the Millennial Reassessment of Consciousness and the Cognitive Nonconscious N. Katherine Hayles , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction Studies , 31 March vol. 42 no. 1 2015; (p. 56-77)
'The broader landscape in which Greg Egan's two symmetrically themed novels, Quarantine and Teranesia, unfold includes new research in neuroscience on the cognitive nonconscious (or proto-self) in humans. The cognitive nonconscious, which emerges from underlying neuronal processes, interacts with consciousness and the unconscious through its superior information-processing abilities. Egan links this new research with von Neumann's suggestion in the 1950s that the “wave collapse” in quantum mechanics, in which the superposition of particles creates indeterminacies through the particle's eigenstates, “collapses” so that, upon measurement, only one value is observed. While Quarantine explores the ways in which human consciousness is complicated by its interaction with quantum processes, Teranesia, in remarkable symmetry, investigates the possibility that the cognitive nonconscious may also emerge from and interact with quantum processes. Thus Egan plays with realigning into different configurations the three categories of consciousness/unconsciousness, the cognitive nonconscious, and material processes. As a result, the two novels constitute an important contribution to the millennial reassessment of the costs of consciousness and the rise of the cognitive nonconscious, serving as narratives to think with and through the recursive paradoxes and conceptual complexities inherent in this paradigm shift.' (Publication abstract)
Geopolitics in Greg Egan's Science Fiction Darren Jorgensen , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 1 2014; (p. 186-198)
The Fiction of the Future : Australian Science Fiction Russell Blackford , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 128-140)
'According to Russell Blackford 'commercial science fiction is the most international of literary forms.' He observes that 'Australian SF continues to flourish, even if it trails heroic fantasy in mass-market appeal.' Australian SF writers although published internationally, with a dedicated fan followings in USA, UK and Europe, were overlooked for a very long time by Australian multinational publishers. The international editions had to be imported and were then distributed in Australia (Congreve and Marquardt 8). Blackford in his chapter throws light on the history of Australian SF and observes how Australian SF writers, with their concern for the future, achieved a powerful synthesis in form and content. The progress of Australian SF, maturity of style in the work of younger writers, and massive worldwide sales make Blackford optimistic as he asserts that 'the best Australian writers in the genre will be prominent players on the world stage.' (Editor's foreword xii-xiii)
Scanners Bruce Gillespie , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction , August no. 80A 2010; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Untitled Keith Stevenson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 42 2009; (p. 134-137)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan 2008 single work novel ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Tomorrow's Selfhood: Self in the Science Fiction of Greg Egan Van Ikin , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Fantastic Self : Essays on the Subject of the Self 1999; (p. 295-303)
Looking Awry at Cyberpunk Through Antipodean Eyes: Reading Neal Stephenson and Greg Egan from the Margins Andrew Macrae , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Summer vol. 13 no. 1 1998; (p. 31-43)
Untitled George Turner , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 12 no. 2 (Issue 35) 1993; (p. 22-24)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
The State of Quarantine Sean McMullen , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy , Summer no. 11 1993; (p. 40-45)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Imaginative, but Flawed Colin Steele , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 January 1993; (p. C6)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Science Fiction Simon , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Newcastle Herald , 27 March 1993; (p. 48)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Untitled Steven Paulsen , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 12 1993; (p. 86)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
A Ride on the Cosmic Roller-Coaster Terry Dowling , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19-20 December 1992; (p. rev 6)

— Review of Back Door Man Ian McAuley Hails 1992 single work novel ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel ; Intimate Armageddons 1992 anthology short story
SF Reality at the Mercy of `Mod' Cons Van Ikin , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 December 1992; (p. 46)

— Review of The Inner Domain Phil Collas 1935 single work novella ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Untitled George Turner , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 12 no. 2 (Issue 35) 1993; (p. 22-24)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
The State of Quarantine Sean McMullen , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy , Summer no. 11 1993; (p. 40-45)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Scanners Bruce Gillespie , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: SF Commentary : The Independent Magazine About Science Fiction , August no. 80A 2010; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Untitled Keith Stevenson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 42 2009; (p. 134-137)

— Review of Incandescence Greg Egan 2008 single work novel ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
A Ride on the Cosmic Roller-Coaster Terry Dowling , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19-20 December 1992; (p. rev 6)

— Review of Back Door Man Ian McAuley Hails 1992 single work novel ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel ; Intimate Armageddons 1992 anthology short story
SF Reality at the Mercy of `Mod' Cons Van Ikin , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 December 1992; (p. 46)

— Review of The Inner Domain Phil Collas 1935 single work novella ; Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Imaginative, but Flawed Colin Steele , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 January 1993; (p. C6)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Science Fiction Simon , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Newcastle Herald , 27 March 1993; (p. 48)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
Untitled Steven Paulsen , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 12 1993; (p. 86)

— Review of Quarantine Greg Egan 1992 single work novel
The Fiction of the Future : Australian Science Fiction Russell Blackford , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 128-140)
'According to Russell Blackford 'commercial science fiction is the most international of literary forms.' He observes that 'Australian SF continues to flourish, even if it trails heroic fantasy in mass-market appeal.' Australian SF writers although published internationally, with a dedicated fan followings in USA, UK and Europe, were overlooked for a very long time by Australian multinational publishers. The international editions had to be imported and were then distributed in Australia (Congreve and Marquardt 8). Blackford in his chapter throws light on the history of Australian SF and observes how Australian SF writers, with their concern for the future, achieved a powerful synthesis in form and content. The progress of Australian SF, maturity of style in the work of younger writers, and massive worldwide sales make Blackford optimistic as he asserts that 'the best Australian writers in the genre will be prominent players on the world stage.' (Editor's foreword xii-xiii)
Looking Awry at Cyberpunk Through Antipodean Eyes: Reading Neal Stephenson and Greg Egan from the Margins Andrew Macrae , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Summer vol. 13 no. 1 1998; (p. 31-43)
Tomorrow's Selfhood: Self in the Science Fiction of Greg Egan Van Ikin , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Fantastic Self : Essays on the Subject of the Self 1999; (p. 295-303)
Geopolitics in Greg Egan's Science Fiction Darren Jorgensen , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 1 2014; (p. 186-198)
Greg Egan's Quarantine and Teranesia : Contributions to the Millennial Reassessment of Consciousness and the Cognitive Nonconscious N. Katherine Hayles , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction Studies , 31 March vol. 42 no. 1 2015; (p. 56-77)
'The broader landscape in which Greg Egan's two symmetrically themed novels, Quarantine and Teranesia, unfold includes new research in neuroscience on the cognitive nonconscious (or proto-self) in humans. The cognitive nonconscious, which emerges from underlying neuronal processes, interacts with consciousness and the unconscious through its superior information-processing abilities. Egan links this new research with von Neumann's suggestion in the 1950s that the “wave collapse” in quantum mechanics, in which the superposition of particles creates indeterminacies through the particle's eigenstates, “collapses” so that, upon measurement, only one value is observed. While Quarantine explores the ways in which human consciousness is complicated by its interaction with quantum processes, Teranesia, in remarkable symmetry, investigates the possibility that the cognitive nonconscious may also emerge from and interact with quantum processes. Thus Egan plays with realigning into different configurations the three categories of consciousness/unconsciousness, the cognitive nonconscious, and material processes. As a result, the two novels constitute an important contribution to the millennial reassessment of the costs of consciousness and the rise of the cognitive nonconscious, serving as narratives to think with and through the recursive paradoxes and conceptual complexities inherent in this paradigm shift.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 17 Jun 2014 13:04:13
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