An Allegory single work   poetry   "The fight was over, and the battle won."
  • Author: Barcroft Boake http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/boake-barcroft
Issue Details: First known date: 1892 1892
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Bulletin vol. 12 no. 632 26 March 1892 Z623694 1892 periodical issue 1892 pg. 16
  • Appears in:
    y Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , Alfred George Stephens (editor), Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1897 Z866614 1897 selected work poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1897 pg. 73
  • Appears in:
    y Aussie: The Australian Soldiers Magazine no. 13 April 1919 Z623866 1919 periodical issue 1919 pg. 21
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Book of Australian Verse Harry Payne Heseltine (editor), Ringwood Harmondsworth : Penguin , 1972 Z334403 1972 anthology poetry Selection of works by Australian poets from Charles Harpur (1813-1868) to Charles Buckmaster (b. 1951). Ringwood Harmondsworth : Penguin , 1972 pg. 94
  • Appears in:
    y The Collins Book of Australian Poetry Rodney Hall , Sydney : Collins , 1981 Z542215 1981 anthology poetry Sydney : Collins , 1981 pg. 46
  • Appears in:
    y The Turning Wave : Poems and Songs of Irish Australia Colleen Burke (editor), Vincent Woods (editor), Armidale : Kardoorair Press , 2001 Z929605 2001 anthology poetry Armidale : Kardoorair Press , 2001 pg. 163
  • Appears in:
    y Sunlines : An Anthology of Poetry to Celebrate Australia's Harmony in Diversity Anne Fairbairn (editor), Canberra : Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs , 2002 Z948024 2002 anthology poetry Canberra : Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs , 2002 pg. 17
  • Appears in:
    y Barcroft Boake: Collected Works, Edited, with a Life Barcroft Boake , W. F. Refshauge (editor), Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2007 Z1433606 2007 collected work poetry 'The 1890s produced an extraordinary outpouring of distinctively Australian writing. The most famous writers now are Banjo Paterson and Henry Lawson, but others were as well known in their day. Among the half-forgotten poets is Barcroft Boake, who as a young man from Sydney found a job up country, and fell in love with the bush way of life. From Western Queensland in summer to Adaminaby in winter, he lived that life, and it sustains his writing. His wrote about what he found: very real people, often people he knew, and their successes and disasters. But he was also a casualty of the hard times of the early 'nineties. In the grip of depression, aged just twenty-six, he killed himself. His best-known work is the ballad 'Where the Dead Men Lie', an Australian classic. He wrote many others as attractive but less well known. Here, they are all carefully edited, and the extensive notes include background on the events and characters in the poems.' (Publisher's blurb) Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2007 pg. 125; notes 266
  • Appears in:
    y Sense, Shape, Symbol : An Investigation of Australian Poetry Brian Keyte (editor), Putney : Phoenix Education , 2013 6310209 2013 anthology criticism poetry

    'Sense, Shape, Symbol is an investigation of Australian poetry. It explores the ways in which poets succeed, or fail, in their attempts to bring their experience to life.

    Their primary raw materials are the five senses - sight, sound, smell, taste and touch - the means by which we all experience our world.

    Poets also like to experiment with the shape of their writing, starting with the qualities of vowels and consonants, of syllables, and of rhyme, metre and rhythm.

    Working poets make particular use of the metaphor, of the connections that they suggest between normally unlike things, to express their response to their subject.

    The collection explores the work of five poets who have played an important, influential part in the development of Australian poetry: Judith Wright, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, David Malouf, Les Murray and Mark O’Connor.

    The final chapter looks at some of the common concerns that can create conflict in our lives, such as gender, race, age, and socio-economic status, and other issues that create fear and that encourage hope.

    The collection is intended to allow readers to become familiar with the techniques that poets use, and to develop their own poetic writing in an informed way.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Putney : Phoenix Education , 2013
    pg. 116
Alternative title: مجاز
Transliterated title: Majaz
First line of verse: "The fight was over, and the battle won. = .القتال انتهى، وربحوا في المعركة"
Language: English , Arabic
Last amended 5 Sep 2013 18:12:55
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