The Fittest single work   short story   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1985 1985
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'George Turner's story "The Fittest" evokes the concept of "culling," a deliberate scientific attempt to reduce the world's population' (Colin Steele, SF Commentary No 77 2001, p.52)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Sea and Eternal Summer: Science Fiction, Futurology and Climate Change 2013 single work
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'This paper will be concerned to analyse what is almost certainly the earliest Australian climate change dystopia. In 1985 George Turner published a short story, The Fittest, in which he began to explore the fictional possibilities of the effects of global warming. He quickly expanded this story into a full-length novel published as The Sea and Summer in Britain and as Drowning Towers in the United States. The Sea and Summer is set mainly in Melbourne, a vividly described, particular place, terrifyingly transformed into the utterly unfamiliar. Turner’s core narrative describes a world of mass unemployment and social polarisation, in which rising sea levels have inundated the Bayside suburbs; the poor ‘Swill’ live in high-rise tower blocks, the lower floors of which are progressively submerged; the wealthier ‘Sweet’ in suburbia on higher ground. The paper will argue that Turner’s novel is long overdue a positive critical re-evaluation.' (Publication abstract)
Postcolonial Criticism, Ecocriticism and Climate Change : A Tale of Melbourne under Water in 2035 Anne Maxwell , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , March vol. 45 no. 1 2009; (p. 15-26)
The difficulty that postcolonial critics have found in opposing the recent, aggressive phase of capitalism known as 'globalization' has led to a crisis in relevancy in the discipline. Engaging with ecocritical discourses is one way to overcome this crisis. Some postcolonial poets and writers are already working in this way, and although historically ecocriticism has posed problems for postcolonial critics, the changes that ecocriticism has recently undergone mean that such concerns are fading. An area of study that is especially promising for postcolonial critics is analysing apocalyptic dystopias that speculate on the dire social and physical consequences of global warming. Taking a text by a leading Australian author as an example, this article argues that criticism that combines postcolonial and ecocritical concepts is able not only to expose late capitalism's crucial role in global warming but also to show readers that the political choices they make now will have lasting consequences for the lifestyles of coming generations. -- Author's abstract
Enjoy a Good Short Story : Bruce Gillespie’s Favourite Short Fiction (SF and Fantasy) Published 1977-2006 Bruce Gillespie , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Steam Engine Time , October no. 7 2007; (p. 28-29)

— Review of The Battle of Acosta Nu Gerald Murnane 1985 single work short story ; Looking Forward to the Harvest Cherry Wilder 1979-1991 single work short story ; Inhabiting the Interspaces Philippa Maddern 1979 single work short story ; Pie Row Joe Kevin McKay 1978 single work short story ; The Caress Greg Egan 1990 single work short story ; The Fittest George Turner 1985 single work short story ; A Map of the Mines of Barnath Sean Williams 1995 single work short story ; On the Turn Leanne Frahm 1986 single work short story ; The Bone Ship Terry Dowling 2003 single work short story ; Angel Thing Petrina Smith 1995 single work short story ; Not with Love Philippa Maddern 1995 single work short story ; A Man and His Dreams Marele Day 1996 single work short story ; Wooden Bride Margo Lanagan 2004 single work short story ; The Dove Game Isobelle Carmody 2003 single work short story ; White Time Margo Lanagan 2003 single work short story ; The Gloaming Lucy Sussex 2000 single work short story ; Number 3 Raw Place Deborah Biancotti 2004 single work short story ; Singing My Sister Down Margo Lanagan 2004 single work short story ; The Grinding House Kaaron Warren 2005 selected work short story novella ; Basic Black Terry Dowling 1978 single work short story ; One Thing About the Night Terry Dowling 2005 single work short story ; Fresh Young Widow Kaaron Warren 2005 single work short story ; Bones Rjurik Davidson 2004 single work short story ; Re-Deem the Time David J. Lake 1978 single work short story
Enjoy a Good Short Story : Bruce Gillespie’s Favourite Short Fiction (SF and Fantasy) Published 1977-2006 Bruce Gillespie , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: Steam Engine Time , October no. 7 2007; (p. 28-29)

— Review of The Battle of Acosta Nu Gerald Murnane 1985 single work short story ; Looking Forward to the Harvest Cherry Wilder 1979-1991 single work short story ; Inhabiting the Interspaces Philippa Maddern 1979 single work short story ; Pie Row Joe Kevin McKay 1978 single work short story ; The Caress Greg Egan 1990 single work short story ; The Fittest George Turner 1985 single work short story ; A Map of the Mines of Barnath Sean Williams 1995 single work short story ; On the Turn Leanne Frahm 1986 single work short story ; The Bone Ship Terry Dowling 2003 single work short story ; Angel Thing Petrina Smith 1995 single work short story ; Not with Love Philippa Maddern 1995 single work short story ; A Man and His Dreams Marele Day 1996 single work short story ; Wooden Bride Margo Lanagan 2004 single work short story ; The Dove Game Isobelle Carmody 2003 single work short story ; White Time Margo Lanagan 2003 single work short story ; The Gloaming Lucy Sussex 2000 single work short story ; Number 3 Raw Place Deborah Biancotti 2004 single work short story ; Singing My Sister Down Margo Lanagan 2004 single work short story ; The Grinding House Kaaron Warren 2005 selected work short story novella ; Basic Black Terry Dowling 1978 single work short story ; One Thing About the Night Terry Dowling 2005 single work short story ; Fresh Young Widow Kaaron Warren 2005 single work short story ; Bones Rjurik Davidson 2004 single work short story ; Re-Deem the Time David J. Lake 1978 single work short story
Postcolonial Criticism, Ecocriticism and Climate Change : A Tale of Melbourne under Water in 2035 Anne Maxwell , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , March vol. 45 no. 1 2009; (p. 15-26)
The difficulty that postcolonial critics have found in opposing the recent, aggressive phase of capitalism known as 'globalization' has led to a crisis in relevancy in the discipline. Engaging with ecocritical discourses is one way to overcome this crisis. Some postcolonial poets and writers are already working in this way, and although historically ecocriticism has posed problems for postcolonial critics, the changes that ecocriticism has recently undergone mean that such concerns are fading. An area of study that is especially promising for postcolonial critics is analysing apocalyptic dystopias that speculate on the dire social and physical consequences of global warming. Taking a text by a leading Australian author as an example, this article argues that criticism that combines postcolonial and ecocritical concepts is able not only to expose late capitalism's crucial role in global warming but also to show readers that the political choices they make now will have lasting consequences for the lifestyles of coming generations. -- Author's abstract
The Sea and Eternal Summer: Science Fiction, Futurology and Climate Change 2013 single work
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'This paper will be concerned to analyse what is almost certainly the earliest Australian climate change dystopia. In 1985 George Turner published a short story, The Fittest, in which he began to explore the fictional possibilities of the effects of global warming. He quickly expanded this story into a full-length novel published as The Sea and Summer in Britain and as Drowning Towers in the United States. The Sea and Summer is set mainly in Melbourne, a vividly described, particular place, terrifyingly transformed into the utterly unfamiliar. Turner’s core narrative describes a world of mass unemployment and social polarisation, in which rising sea levels have inundated the Bayside suburbs; the poor ‘Swill’ live in high-rise tower blocks, the lower floors of which are progressively submerged; the wealthier ‘Sweet’ in suburbia on higher ground. The paper will argue that Turner’s novel is long overdue a positive critical re-evaluation.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 12 Jun 2014 14:28:39
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