The Last Peninsula single work   poetry   "Bright blood on the sheets this morning"
  • Author: Dorothy Hewett http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/hewett-dorothy
Issue Details: First known date: 1993 1993
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Notes

  • This poem has a prologue and eight numbered parts.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Overland no. 131 Winter 1993 Z593695 1993 periodical issue 1993 pg. 71-73
  • Appears in:
    y Peninsula Dorothy Hewett , South Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1994 Z392162 1994 selected work poetry South Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1994 pg. 135-143
  • Appears in:
    y Collected Poems : 1940-1995 Dorothy Hewett , William Grono (editor), Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1995 Z332769 1995 selected work poetry Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1995 pg. 390-396
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Poetry Library APRIL; APL; The Australian Poetry Resources Internet Library John Tranter , Sydney : 2004- Z1368099 2004- website

    'The Australian Poetry Library (APL) aims to promote a greater appreciation and understanding of Australian poetry by providing access to a wide range of poetic texts as well as to critical and contextual material relating to them, including interviews, photographs and audio/visual recordings.

    This website currently contains over 42,000 poems, representing the work of more than 170 Australian poets. All the poems are fully searchable, and may be accessed and read freely on the World Wide Web. Readers wishing to download and print poems may do so for a small fee, part of which is returned to the poets via CAL, the Copyright Agency Limited. Teachers, students and readers of Australian poetry can also create personalised anthologies, which can be purchased and downloaded. Print on demand versions will be availabe from Sydney University Press in the near future.

    It is hoped that the APL will encourage teachers to use more Australian material in their English classes, as well as making Australian poetry much more available to readers in remote and regional areas and overseas. It will also help Australian poets, not only by developing new audiences for their work but by allowing them to receive payment for material still in copyright, thus solving the major problem associated with making this material accessible on the Internet.

    The Australian Poetry Library is a joint initiative of the University of Sydney and the Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). Begun in 2004 with a prototype site developed by leading Australian poet John Tranter, the project has been funded by a major Linkage Grant from the Australian Research Council (ARC), CAL and the University of Sydney Library. A team of researchers from the University of Sydney, led by Professor Elizabeth Webby and John Tranter, in association with CAL, have developed the Australian Poetry Library as a permanent and wide-ranging Internet archive of Australian poetry resources.' Source: www.poetrylibrary.edu.au (Sighted 30/05/2011).

    Sydney : 2004-
  • Appears in:
    y Motherlode : Australian Women's Poetry 1986 - 2008 Jennifer Harrison (editor), Kate Waterhouse (editor), Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 Z1592305 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) 'Motherlode portrays the story of children and mothers from the perspective of women and their social and emotional contexts.' (The editors) Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 pg. 304-307
    Note: Prologue and parts 1-3
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems of Dorothy Hewett Dorothy Hewett , Kate Lilley , Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2010 Z1706151 2010 selected work poetry (taught in 2 units) 'Dorothy Hewett is one of Australia's best known poets. She had a long and frequently controversial career during which she produced twelve collections of poetry, three novels, an autobiography, thirteen plays and countless articles and short stories. This very special volume has been compiled and introduced by Kate Lilley, a poet, scholar and Dorothy's daughter.' (From the publisher's website.) Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2010 pg. 144-152
    Note: Parts 1-8

Works about this Work

The Hedge and the Labyrinth. A Holistic Vision of Dorothy Hewett´s Poetry M. S. Suarez Lafuente , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
'Dorothy Hewett´s poetry follows a complex architecture, a structure which encompasses her personal beliefs and the guiding lights that consciously and unconsciously led her life, while it also draws and deploys core elements from the literary tradition of Western culture. The primary image that pervades her poems is the garden, which is either the place where many of her poems occur or a significant component in others. Hewett´s garden retains several of the characteristics of the primordial garden, such as innocence, abundance and placid solitude, but it also partakes of its Romantic nuances, which, after all, are the same as in Eden but enhanced by feeling and intensity. The garden as literary locus sets the pace of Hewett´s poetry in that it links myth-making with literary tradition, the pillars that sustain the body of her poetic reality. This triangle, myth, tradition and reality, incorporates the main topics that the Australian writer inscribes in her work, and, while each corner retains its thematic substance, it also reflects the other two, thus giving unity to the whole poetic process. As Bruce Bennett pointed out as early as 1995, "place, appropriately conceived, is a meeting ground of mental, emotional and physical states and as such is a suitable focus
for the literary imagination" (Bennett: 19).' (Author's introduction)
The Hedge and the Labyrinth. A Holistic Vision of Dorothy Hewett´s Poetry M. S. Suarez Lafuente , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
'Dorothy Hewett´s poetry follows a complex architecture, a structure which encompasses her personal beliefs and the guiding lights that consciously and unconsciously led her life, while it also draws and deploys core elements from the literary tradition of Western culture. The primary image that pervades her poems is the garden, which is either the place where many of her poems occur or a significant component in others. Hewett´s garden retains several of the characteristics of the primordial garden, such as innocence, abundance and placid solitude, but it also partakes of its Romantic nuances, which, after all, are the same as in Eden but enhanced by feeling and intensity. The garden as literary locus sets the pace of Hewett´s poetry in that it links myth-making with literary tradition, the pillars that sustain the body of her poetic reality. This triangle, myth, tradition and reality, incorporates the main topics that the Australian writer inscribes in her work, and, while each corner retains its thematic substance, it also reflects the other two, thus giving unity to the whole poetic process. As Bruce Bennett pointed out as early as 1995, "place, appropriately conceived, is a meeting ground of mental, emotional and physical states and as such is a suitable focus
for the literary imagination" (Bennett: 19).' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 19 Jan 2014 12:14:01
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