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y For Love Alone single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1944 1944
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Superbly evoking life in Sydney and London in the 1930s, For Love Alone is the story of the intelligent and determined Teresa Hawkins, who believes in passionate love and yearns to experience it. She focuses her energy on Jonathan Crow, an unlikeable and arrogant man whom she follows to London after four long years of working in a factory and living at home with her loveless family. Reunited with Crow in London, she begins to realise that perhaps he is not as worthy of her affections as originally thought and abandons her idealised vision of love for something quite different.' (From Melbourne University Publishing's website, new ed., 2011)

Adaptations

form y For Love Alone Stephen Henry Wallace , Australia : Western Film Productions , 1986 Z1681955 1986 single work film/TV

Set in Australia in the 1930s, For Love Alone is the story of Teresa, a poor young woman in love with a dashing but arrogant teacher who preaches free love and watered-down socialist precepts. She follows him to England, meeting a gentle banker en route. The film follows her relationships as they are transformed in England.

Notes

  • Adapted for the 1986 film For Love Alone directed by Stephen Wallace. Screenplay by Stephen Wallace.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Sola per amore
Language: Italian

Works about this Work

Guide to the Classics : Christina Stead’s The Beauties and Furies Margaret Harris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 26 September 2016;
'From the beginning Christina Stead’s fiction divided critical opinion, and reactions to The Beauties and Furies, her second novel, were no exception. Where some saw “garrulous pretentiousness”, Clifton Fadiman in the New Yorker found “such streaming imagination, such tireless wit, such intellectual virtuosity” that Stead must be recognised as “the most extraordinary woman novelist produced by the English-speaking race since Virginia Woolf”. ...'
Re-encountering Christina Stead : Why Read ‘Workshop in the Novel’? Alison Burns , R. A. Goodrich , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 18 no. 1 2014;

'Despite waves of interest in the work of Christina Stead, one aspect of her writing life has been largely neglected. From September 1943, she taught three series of extended writing workshops in New York and in the process left more than three hundred pages documenting her teaching. The question motivating this paper is: Why should we, as writers and teachers of writing, read her writing workshop notebooks nowadays? This paper will place Stead’s workshop in the context of the development of institutional teaching of novel writing and her emergence as a major writer. It will briefly examine how the notebooks have previously been understood and offer a closer analysis than has been made to date of the notebooks and their content and of the key issues raised by them. In particular, we shall explore her pedagogic focus upon workshop participants developing a rigorous, analytical approach to crafting novels and her extensive use of Georges Polti’s Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations to achieve this. That, in turn, will enable us to assess what the notebooks independently reveal about her beliefs regarding the novel and its purpose. ' (Publication summary)

Resisting Judgement in Christina Stead : Critical Writing of the 1980s Ann Blake , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 4 2014;
'Jonathan Franzen writing in 2010 in The New York Times deplored the neglect of Christina Stead, and especially of her masterpiece, The Man Who Loved Children. He quoted a 1980 study of the 100 most-cited literary writers of the twentieth century, based on scholarly citations, which made no mention of Stead. He continued: ‘This would be less puzzling if Stead and her best novel didn’t positively cry out for academic criticism of every stripe. Especially confounding is that The Man Who Loved Children has failed to become a core text in every women’s studies program in the country’ (12). Franzen’s complaint is of course an old story, and what is true of this novel is true of her work as a whole. Her first two books, published originally in England, appeared with considerable acclaim there and in Australia. After thirty years of mixed reviews, she at last won accolades and prizes, but has not managed to hold a sure place in the Western canon, or with the common reader. Among writers, however, she has a vocal following, Franzen being the latest in a distiguished list. ' (Author's introduction)
For Love and Hunger Fiona Wright , 2013 single work prose
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , June 2013;
Christina Stead : Her Luck Ann-Marie Priest , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 72 no. 3 2013; (p. 66-78)
Dorothy Green Memorial Lecture : Archipelagic Space and the Uncertain Future of National Literatures Elizabeth McMahon , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;

'This essay joins in the discussion about the future of national literatures in the shifting formations of globalisation. Specifically, I want to interrogate what we mean by the future when we speak of literature and, specifically, of Australian or New Zealand literature.

The essay proposes a literary cartography that overlays the alienation of this ‘no world’ with the ‘no-place’ of island utopias as they are mobilised in archipelagic chains or threads. This alternative model of spatial relationality and dynamism differs from conventional global traffic. It is a cartography derived from islands: from their history, fictions, and their theorists. This project is at least partly utopian in a strictly generic sense; that is, in its implication in the reading practices and politics of utopian texts.' (Author's abstract)

Modernist/Provincial/Pacific : Katherine Mansfield, Christina Stead and Expatriate Home Ground Fiona Morrison , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;

'Rebecca Walkowitz, citing Said and others, suggests that the critical cosmopolitanism inherent in the work of several British modernists was underpinned by an awareness (among other things) of “the entanglement of domestic and international perspectives” and an “attempt to operate in the world... while preserving a posture of resistance”. Cosmopolitan modernism in these kinds of ‘critical’ robes offers a useful space in which to examine the work of settler colonial expatriate woman modernists. In particular, this paper will investigate the powerful, disruptive and often uneven return to home ground in the shape of Stead and Mansfield’s modernist narratives about their provincial cities of origin on the Pacific Rim. This paper takes as its starting point Christina Stead’s early work, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934). While acknowledging the pressing complications of her identification with international socialism, what kind of interpretive traction do we gain by positing Stead’s participation in both Pacific and transnational modernism in her rendition of Sydney? Katherine Mansfield’s earlier New Zealand stories will provide further and quite different material for Tasman/Pacific oriented speculation about the nature of the expatriate modernist woman’s worldly recuperation of her colonial hometown.

' (Author's abstract)

'Our Kind of Country' : Writing Australia from New Mexico Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magnificent Obsessions : Honouring the Lives of Hazel Rowley 2013; (p. 104-121)
Literature of the Pacific, Mainly Australian Peter Pierce , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , vol. 12 no. 2 2013; (p. 210-219)

This lecture is in some ways the ‘lost’ chapter of The Cambridge History of Australian Literature (2009), one eventually not written because the projected author could find not enough literary material even in that vast Pacific Ocean, or perhaps found – as mariners have – only far separated specks in that ocean. Yet Australian literature about the nation’s Pacific littoral and the islands within the ocean and the ocean itself is varied, considerable, and often eccentric. Our greatest drinking song is Barry Humphries’s ‘The Old Pacific Sea’. The Japs and the jungle are the hallmarks of fiction, poetry and reportage of the Pacific War of 1942-5. New Guinea has attracted such writers as James McAuley, Peter Ryan, Trevor Shearston, Randolph Stow and Drusilla Modjeska. The short stories of Louis Becke are the most extensive and iconoclastic writing about the Pacific by any Australian. Yet the literature of the Pacific littoral seems thinner than that of the Indian Ocean. The map on the title page of Rolf Boldrewood’s A Modern Buccaneer (1894) shows those afore-mentioned specks in a vast expanse of water. What aesthetic challenges have Pacific writing posed and how have they been met? Have the waters of the Pacific satisfied Australians as a near offshore playground but defeated wider efforts of the imagination? ' (Publication summary)

Satirising White Australia in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone Lucinda O'Brien , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Christina Stead's For Love Alone is an iconic text in Australian literary studies, but until now, few critics have addressed the novel's treatment of colonialism and race relations. Feminist critics have played an important role in preserving Stead's reputation, and for this reason, most critical discussions of For Love Alone focus on its gender politics. This criticism generally regards Stead's protagonist, Teresa Hawkins, as a feminist heroine engaged in a struggle against patriarchy. This ideological approach is a valuable corrective to more autobiographical readings of For Love Alone, which treat the novel, rather reductively, as an account of Stead's personal experiences or as an expression of her 'private mythology'. Yet I argue that in taking Teresa for a heroine, feminist scholars do not sufficiently recognise Teresa's status as an object of satire. In this article, I highlight Stead's sharply satiric portrayal of Teresa as a narcissist, whose voyage of discovery ironically highlights her inability to learn or to change. I contend that Teresa's journey to London reveals her affinities with the regressive, racist ideology of her father and her love object, Jonathan Crow. In her self-appointed role as an 'Australian Ulysses', Teresa demonstrates the links between Australian nationalism, imperialism and racist ideologies. Without disputing the importance of feminist themes in the novel, I propose a new reading of For love alone as a complex work of postcolonial satire.' (Author's abstract)
'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
y Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 Peter Morton , New York (City) : Palgrave Macmillan , 2011 Z1826218 2011 single work criticism

'Long before the post-WWII migration, over one hundred Australian writers left their homeland to seek fame and fortune in London. Some made little mark despite their arduous efforts; some made a tolerable living; a few, like Martin Boyd, H.H. Richardson and Christina Stead, actually achieved permanent fame. Lusting for London analyses how these writers reacted to their new surroundings—in both their autobiographical writings and their creative work. With wit and rigor, Peter Morton studies the expatriate experience and reveals the ways in which the loss of these expatriates affected the evolving literary culture of Australia' (Publisher blurb).

Contents: Issues of Definition and Evidence; Sailing for El Dorado: Going Home in the Literary Imagination; A Gout of Bile: Metic and Immigrant Expatriates; The Aroma of the Past: in Antipodean London; Drawing off the Rich Cream: The Struggle in London; Who Are You? No One: The Hacking Journalist in London; The Dear Old Mother Country: Richardson's The Way Home and Stead's For Love Alone; Always the Feeling of Australia in the Air: Martin Boyd's Lucinda Brayford; A Leaven of Venturesome Minds: Literary Expatriates and Australian Culture; No More Pap from the Teats of London: From Expatriation toTtransnationalism; Conclusion: A Padded Cell in Wagga Wagga.

Eyes Right Geordie Williamson , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 3 -4 December 2011; (p. 12)
In a round-up of recent Australian and overseas publications,'Geordie Williamson advises on the season's most enticing reading' (p.12).
For Better or for Worse Drusilla Modjeska , 2011 extract criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3-4 December 2011; (p. 37)
An edited extract from Drusilla Modjeska's introduction to the 2011 edition of Christina Stead's For Love Alone. Modjeska 'rediscovers a classic, in which a steamy Sydney and an alluring London share the stage in a woman's pursuit of the wrong romance.' (Editor's abstract)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)
Peter Pierce looks at contemporary Australian fiction to define Australia's 'Silver Age of Australian fiction' .
Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Cleaning up the Queer : Sex, Love and Ideology in Stephen Wallace's For Love Alone Ann-Marie Cook , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 6 April vol. 5 no. 1 2011; (p. 59-70)
'This article positions Stephen Wallace's adaptation (1986) of Christina Stead's novel, For Love Alone (1944), as a conservative revision of a literary text whose radical engagement with queer desires challenged heteronormative values and institutions. Drawing upon production files, personal correspondence with the film-maker, literary and film criticism and textual analysis, the article quantifies the ideological work of the adaptation. It identifies Stead's treatment of non-monogamous heterosexual relationships, fantasies rooted alternative sexual practices and homoerotic triangulations as the basis for the novel's queer space. It then shows how the film imposed a heteronormative sensibility upon the narrative by eliminating references to any form of same-sex desire, framing the heroine's journey as a marriage quest that ignored other aspects of personal and professional development and confirming her abandonment of free love in favour of wedded bliss. The article traces this eradication of queer space to factors in the adaptation process, logistical issues that arose during production and promotional discourses that encouraged it to be received as a love story. By reflecting on the significance of the film's failure to register the novel's queer resonances, its active promotion of monogamous marriage and the circumstances that produced those creative decisions, the article sheds light on the ideological dynamics of both the film and the creative process as a whole.' (Author's abstract)
The Dear Old Mother Country : Richardson's the Way Home and Stead's For Love Alone Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 133-163)
Teresa's Awakening : An Analysis of the Characterization of 'For Love Alone' Lin Fan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Xihua University , 30 August vol. 29 no. 4 2010; (p. 83-88)
This article analyses teresa, the protagonist from For Love Alone, in search of connections between Stead's social reality and the literature she produced.
When the Last Leaf Falls Glen Phillips , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 151-165)
In this paper Glen Phillips shows 'how 221 years ago the British and European desire to create a new nation in Australia was partly motivated by a wish to escape the pollution and overcrowding of their nations' cities.' (p152)
Classic Tales of Discovery Laurie Clancy , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7-8 July 1990; (p. rev 7)

— Review of My Brother Jack : A Novel George Johnston 1964 single work novel ; Coonardoo : The Well in the Shadow Katharine Susannah Prichard 1928 single work novel ; For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel ; Ride on Stranger Kylie Tennant 1943 single work novel
The Need to Admit Truth in the Quest for Self Veronica Sen , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 8 July 1990; (p. 18)

— Review of My Brother Jack : A Novel George Johnston 1964 single work novel ; Coonardoo : The Well in the Shadow Katharine Susannah Prichard 1928 single work novel ; For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel ; The House in the Rainforest Sophie Masson 1990 single work novel ; Ride on Stranger Kylie Tennant 1943 single work novel ; Walk to the Paradise Gardens Charmian Clift 1960 single work novel
'...as absorbing and as unscrupulous as a woman's purpose' Elizabeth Perkins , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , October no. 2 1979; (p. 30-34)

— Review of Selected Verse Mary Gilmore 1948 selected work poetry ; The End of a Childhood and Other Stories Henry Handel Richardson 1934 selected work short story ; Waterway Eleanor Dark 1938 single work novel ; For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled L. V. K. , 1944 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30 December no. 33391 1944; (p. 7)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Glory and Catastrophe Douglas Stewart , 1946 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 13 February vol. 67 no. 3444 1946; (p. 2)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Glory and Catastrophe Douglas Stewart , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: The Flesh and the Spirit : An Outlook on Literature 1948; (p. 235-238)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
A Fear of Loving R. G. Howard , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 November vol. 88 no. 4523 1966; (p. 56)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled Suzanne Edgar , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 8 October 1966; (p. 10)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Christina Stead's Great Talent Barbara Jefferis , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 October 1966; (p. 20)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled Neil Jillett , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 8 October 1966; (p. 25)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled Caroline Seaton , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 12 November 1966; (p. 15)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled A. Duchene , 1978 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 8 September 1978; (p. 985)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel ; Letty Fox, Her Luck Christina Stead 1946 single work novel
Untitled C. Tomalin , 1978 single work review
— Appears in: Nation Review , 27 October-2 November 1978; (p. 21)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel ; Letty Fox, Her Luck Christina Stead 1946 single work novel
Untitled C. Tomalin , 1978 single work review
— Appears in: New Statesman , 21 July 1978; (p. 95)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel ; Letty Fox, Her Luck Christina Stead 1946 single work novel
Quality Reprints Elizabeth Perkins , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , September vol. 23 no. 9 1979; (p. 70)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled Paul Byrnes , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22 May 1986; (p. 14)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Untitled T. Mitchell , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Cinema Papers , no. 57 1986; (p. 82)

— Review of For Love Alone Christina Stead 1944 single work novel
Miles Franklin: The Outside Track Anna Rutherford , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Multiple Worlds, Multiple Words : Essays in Honour of Irene Simon 1988; (p. 239-256) Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 118-143)
An Unsentimental Romance: Christina Stead's 'For Love Alone' Jennifer Strauss , 1982 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 4 no. 2 1982; (p. 82-94)
Conflicting Structures in Christina Stead's "For Love Alone" John Colmer , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 160-174)
A Steadfast Revenge : Dr Duncan and Mr Crow Stephen Holt , 2003 single work biography
— Appears in: National Library of Australia News , August vol. 13 no. 11 2003; (p. 7-10)
A Walk around the World : Home and Homelessness in the Work of Christina Stead Janette Turner Hospital , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Janette Turner Hospital 1998; (p. 1-16)
Christina Stead's Last Book : The Novel and the Best-Seller Susan Sheridan , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 2 no. 2003; (p. 41-52)
Discusses the literary aspirations and successes of Christina Stead's protagonists and their relationship to Stead's own ambitions for I'm Dying Laughing.
Feminism and Male Chauvinism in the Writings of Christina Stead (1902-1983) Heather Stewart , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 29 no. 2 2003; (p. 113-122)
Remembering the Thirties : Christina Stead's 'For Love Alone' and 'I'm Dying Laughing' Kristin Hammett , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: And in Our Time : Vision, Revision, and British Writing of the 1930s 2003; (p. 221-242)
From Sea to Air : The Impact of Jet Travel on Australia's 'Australia' Andrew Taylor , 1992-1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Making of a Pluralist Australia 1950-1990: Selected Papers from the Inaugural EASA Conference 1991 1992; (p. 11-24)
A Voyage Round Her Father Peter Craven , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 30-31 July 2005; (p. 6)
y Female Quest in Christina Stead's For Love Alone Mathilda Adie , Lund Stockholm : Lund University Almqvist and Wiksell , 2004 Z1262215 2004 single work criticism
For Love Alone? Anorexia and Teresa's Quest for Love Jane Frugtneit , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 5 2006; (p. 152-162)

Frugtneit asserts that 'the character of Teresa Hawkins [in For Love Alone] displays many of the physiological and psychological symptoms of anorexia. She starves herself in her quest for love, a form of self-abnegation by which she gradually denies sustenance to both her body and mind.'

Frugtneit concludes: 'In the autobiographical For Love Alone Teresa Hawkin's self-starvation in her quest for love reveals how food, desire and identity are inextricably linked ... Ultimately [Theresa] is empowered and she demonstrates her empowerment by reconciling the psychological conflicts that affected her physically through writing the self. Her debilitated body strengthens as she recognises the profound way in which she has achieved independence and sexual liberation. In For Love Alone Teresa's anorexia is a testament to the paradoxes and dilemmas that confront women and their quest for identity.'

y Christina Stead's Heroine : The Changing Sense of Decorum Kate Macomber Stern , New York (City) : Peter Lang , 1989 Z24831 1989 single work criticism biography
Christina Stead's For Love Alone Jennifer Gribble , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Critical Review , vol. 31 no. 1991; (p. 17-27)
The Elided Middle : Christina Stead's For Love Alone and the Colonial 'Voyage In' Fiona Morrison , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 69 no. 2 2009; (p. 155-174)
'Using anthropological accounts of the rites of passage as a point of departure, this essay argues that the sea voyage is the pivotal moment of threshold in the narrative of colonial expatriation for the young Australian woman. This liminal and interstitial moment is narrated as a pedagogical interlude in both Stead's novel and short story; one that taps into the range of possibilities of femininity, landscape and desire elaborated in the first quarter of For Love Alone.' (156-157)
Manifesto of the Senses : Blind Sightedness in Christina Stead's For Love Alone Brigid Rooney , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October/November vol. 24 no. 3-4 2009; (p. 53-65)
'What I aim to show in this essay is how and with what personal and political force the narrative re-presents the reading process itself, how it demands the reader's active co-operation and interpretation, to the point of entrapping us in blindness - or rather in a blind sightedness - that doubles that of its protagonist, Teresa Hawkins. In so doing, the novel performs the questions it poses about romance and realism, idealism and materialism, and conveys, inter alia, its response to mid-twentieth century debates about the literature of revolution.' (53-54)
Constructing the Metropolitan Homeland : The Literatures of the White Settler Societies of New Zealand and Australia Janet Wilson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Comparing Postcolonial Diasporas 2009; (p. 125-145)
Teresa's Awakening : An Analysis of the Characterization of 'For Love Alone' Lin Fan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Xihua University , 30 August vol. 29 no. 4 2010; (p. 83-88)
This article analyses teresa, the protagonist from For Love Alone, in search of connections between Stead's social reality and the literature she produced.
When the Last Leaf Falls Glen Phillips , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 151-165)
In this paper Glen Phillips shows 'how 221 years ago the British and European desire to create a new nation in Australia was partly motivated by a wish to escape the pollution and overcrowding of their nations' cities.' (p152)
y Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 Peter Morton , New York (City) : Palgrave Macmillan , 2011 Z1826218 2011 single work criticism

'Long before the post-WWII migration, over one hundred Australian writers left their homeland to seek fame and fortune in London. Some made little mark despite their arduous efforts; some made a tolerable living; a few, like Martin Boyd, H.H. Richardson and Christina Stead, actually achieved permanent fame. Lusting for London analyses how these writers reacted to their new surroundings—in both their autobiographical writings and their creative work. With wit and rigor, Peter Morton studies the expatriate experience and reveals the ways in which the loss of these expatriates affected the evolving literary culture of Australia' (Publisher blurb).

Contents: Issues of Definition and Evidence; Sailing for El Dorado: Going Home in the Literary Imagination; A Gout of Bile: Metic and Immigrant Expatriates; The Aroma of the Past: in Antipodean London; Drawing off the Rich Cream: The Struggle in London; Who Are You? No One: The Hacking Journalist in London; The Dear Old Mother Country: Richardson's The Way Home and Stead's For Love Alone; Always the Feeling of Australia in the Air: Martin Boyd's Lucinda Brayford; A Leaven of Venturesome Minds: Literary Expatriates and Australian Culture; No More Pap from the Teats of London: From Expatriation toTtransnationalism; Conclusion: A Padded Cell in Wagga Wagga.

Last amended 9 Oct 2014 10:36:07
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