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Screen from opening credits
form y Sunday Too Far Away! single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 1975... 1975
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Set in 1956 on an outback sheep station, the narrative explores the life of the old-time shearers: sweat-soaked days and rum-soaked nights, bloody two-fisted punch ups ... and the scab labour brought in during the shearers' strike of 1956. Central to the main storyline is Foley, a gun shearer who has been unbeaten in the tally for ten years, but who now arrives at the station aware that his days as the fastest shearer are now numbered.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1975

Works about this Work

Sunday Too Far Away Rewatched – Hard Yakka Story of Shearers and Scabs Luke Buckmaster , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 13 March 2015;

— Review of Sunday Too Far Away! John Dingwall 1975 single work film/TV
It Isn't Like We're Lacking Inspiration in Our Books and Music : What's Happened to Great Aussie Movies? Nicolle Flint , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 23 September 2014; (p. 22)
“She Invited Herself” : Sunday Too Far Away (Ken Hannam, 1975) Wes Felton , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March no. 70 2014;

— Review of Sunday Too Far Away! John Dingwall 1975 single work film/TV
Ah, Film Fame - Shear Today, Gone Tomorrow Garry Maddox , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28 March 2013; (p. 17)
South Australian Rules Christopher Sanders , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , October no. 392 2012; (p. 43)
A Superb Essay on Mateship Sandra Hall , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 June vol. [96] no. 4961 1975; (p. 51)

— Review of Sunday Too Far Away! John Dingwall 1975 single work film/TV
“She Invited Herself” : Sunday Too Far Away (Ken Hannam, 1975) Wes Felton , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March no. 70 2014;

— Review of Sunday Too Far Away! John Dingwall 1975 single work film/TV
Sunday Too Far Away Rewatched – Hard Yakka Story of Shearers and Scabs Luke Buckmaster , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 13 March 2015;

— Review of Sunday Too Far Away! John Dingwall 1975 single work film/TV
"Sunday Too Far Away" Revisited Vincent O'Donnell , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Credits Rolling: Film & History Conference, Canberra Australia 2-5 December 2004 : Selected Papers 2004; (p. 73-80)
y 'Sunday Too Far Away' Allan Lantzke , Perth : Centre for Research in Culture and Communication (Murdoch University) , 1997 Z1666360 1997 single work criticism Research undertaken by a student of the Centre for Culture and Communication (Murdoch University) into Sunday Too Far Away (1975). Includes aspects relating to the production phase, critical reception, principal performers and production crew, references and a synopsis.
Wogboy Comedies and the Australian National Type Felicity Collins , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diasporas of Australian Cinema 2009; (p. 73-82)

'Popular Australian film comedy since the early 1970s has been dominated by reinventions of the national type. These reinventions involve transformations of the urban larrikin and the bush battler, first established in silent film classics such as The Sentimental Bloke (Raymond Longford 1919) and in Cinesound Studio's Rudd family comedies of the 1930s, directed by Ken G. Hall. These comic types continue to surface in popular film and television as the larrikin, ocker or decent Aussie bloke, exemplified in the 1970s by Bazza McKenzie, in the 1980s by Crocodile Dundee, in the 1990s by Darryl Kerrigan in The Castle, and most recently by cable TV showman Steve Irwin until his untimely death in 2006. Yet despite decades of multiculturalism, little attention has been paid to the impact of post-war, non -British immigration on Australian comic types. This chapter examines three popular comedies which champion ethnically marked characters as either 'New Australians' (They're a Weird Mob, Michael Powell 1966), 'wogboys' (The Wog Boy, Alexsi Vellis 2000) or `chockos' (Fat Pizza, Paul Fenech 2003). It asks whether 'wogboys' and 'chockos' - as diasporic, multicultural or new world comic types - have trumped the larrikins and ockers of Australian screen comedy, or whether 'wogsploitation' films are popular with Australian film and television audiences precisely because they tap into a long. standing national type without disturbing its key characteristics.' (Publication abstract)

Who's Afraid of the Working Class? We Are Rebecca Harkins-Cross , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Lifted Brow , no. 13 2011; (p. 33, 37)
South Australian Rules Christopher Sanders , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , October no. 392 2012; (p. 43)

Awards

1974 winner Australian Film Institute Awards Best Film Winner for the combined years 1974-1975.
Last amended 15 Oct 2014 15:24:31
Subjects:
  • Bush,
  • Queensland,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
Settings:
  • 1956
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