y The Creek of the Four Graves single work   poetry   "I tell a Settler's tale of the old times,"
  • Author: Charles Harpur http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/harpur-charles
Issue Details: First known date: 1845 1845
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Notes

  • A poem in three numbered parts that was extensively revised by Harpur through several manuscript versions. After Harpur's death in 1868, the poem was edited by Henry M. Martin in his preparation of Poems (1883), an edition authorised by the poet's wife, Mary Harpur. All manuscript dates taken from The Poems of Charles Harpur: an Analytical Finding List.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1845
Serialised by: The Weekly Register of Politics, Facts and General Literature 1843-1845 newspaper (100 issues)
Notes:
Serialised in three parts on 9 August (p.67), 16 August (p.78) and 23 August (p.90) 1845. An Erratum was published on 30 August 1845 (p.101).
      1848 .
      (Manuscript) assertion

      Holdings

      Held at: State Library of NSW
      Local Id: C382
      Note:
      4 Line untitled fragment from Part I.

Works about this Work

Is There an Australian Pastoral Poetry? Andrew Taylor , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November no. 14 2015; (p. 38-51)
Pastoral was common as a European literary genre from the Renaissance until the eighteenth century. It existed in other artistic forms as well, especially in the visual arts, and after its demise as a distinct genre elements of it persisted into the twentieth century, for example in music. With the colonial spread of European culture the pastoral influence also extended into other countries, with a mixed fate. Recently, the term Pastoral has come back into prominence in literature in English, not only in Great Britain but also, notably in the USA and Australia, with the growth of writing motivated by ecological involvement with the natural world, especially landscape. This has led to re-definitions of the term Pastoral in the last few decades. A number of Australian poets are looked at to see whether, and how, their writing about landscape might relate to, or incorporate elements of the Pastoral. The Australian poet John Kinsella, in particular, has been a widely published spokesperson for a new definition of Pastoral. His published works trace his move from a politically activist anti-colonialist redefinition of Pastoral towards a quieter, more harmonious, and essentially ethical engagement with the natural world.
The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Learning to Love the Gum Tree Elizabeth Webby , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 120 2010; (p. 44-50)
y White Vanishing : A Settler Australian Hegemonic Textual Strategy, 1789-2006 Elspeth Tilley , St Lucia : 2007 Z1408578 2007 single work thesis 'This thesis conducts a discourse analysis of the 'white vanishing trope' - stories about white Australians who become lost or disappear - in white Australian texts from 1789 to 2006...[T]he white vanishing trope narrates a specific, and remarkably constant, relationship between indigenous bodies, white bodies, time, and space, in which white settlers are victims and survivors, whose occupation of Australia is constructed as inevitable and right.' - from author's abstract (p.ix)
Charles Harpur and the Warp : Strange Happenings in 'The Creek of Four Graves' David Brooks , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 151-165)
"They couldn't tell us how to farm their skin" : White Poems on Black Dispossession Geoff Page , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interactions : Essays on the Literature and Culture of the Asia-Pacific Region 2000; (p. 171-183)
Analyses poems by white Australian authors about dispossession of their land. In his survey of attitudes and poetic technique, Page examines nineteenth and twentieth century poems and finds a reversal of attitudes over time.
The Grave in the Bush Elizabeth Webby , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tilting at Matilda : Literature, Aborigines, Women and the Church in Contemporary Australia 1994; (p. 30-38)
The Terrors of "Terra Nullius" : Gothicising and De-Gothicising Aboriginality Penny Van Toorn , 1992-1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: World Literature Written in English , vol. 32, no2-33, no.1 no. 1992-1993; (p. 87-97)
Ballad and Lyric in Australian Poetry Nelson Wattie , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 10 no. 1 1987; (p. 68-76)
Place, Landscape, Saussure, Region, and Two Australian Colonial Poets : Some Footnotes Kevin Magarey , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mapped but Not Known : The Australian Landscape of the Imagination : Essays and Poems Presented to Brian Elliott LXXV 11 April 1985 1986; (p. 105-127)
God's Sublime Order in Harpur's 'The Creek of the Four Graves' Michael Ackland , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 11 no. 3 1984; (p. 355-370)
Ackland argues that the poem transcends purely descriptive categories and should be read as prophetic, blank verse narrative in the tradition of Milton and Wordsworth. Harpur portrays the struggle between reason and instinct, reenacting man's fall in the light of Miltonic parallels. Beginning in pictorial terms, like much of Harpur's verse, the poem proceeds towards the greater issues of spirituality and salvation through an experience of the sublime.
Sense and Nonsense J. J. Healy , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and the Aborigine in Australia 1770- 1975 1989; (p. 91-112)
Introduction to the Penguin Book of Australian Verse Harry Payne Heseltine , 1972 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Penguin Book of Australian Verse 1972; (p. 27-53)

Explores the passage of Australian poetry from 1788 to the early 1970s, discussing why the anthology focuses on 'articulate, personal poetry', and is weighted toward the fruitful period after 1930. Highlights important themes and concerns of Australian poetry - the quest for an Antipodean Eden, the pursuit of Romantic idealism within a strongly secular culture, and the need to define an Australian vision and identity against English culture - and assesses the individual contributions of major poets.

Harpur and His Editor Cecil W. Salier , 1951 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 12 no. 1 1951; (p. 47-54)
Charles Harpur Frederick T. Macartney , 1923 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 January vol. 44 no. 2241 1923; (p. 2)
Charles Harpur Anonymous , 1875 single work column
— Appears in: The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser , 28 May vol. 35 no. 4017 1875; (p. 4)
Introduction to the Penguin Book of Australian Verse Harry Payne Heseltine , 1972 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Penguin Book of Australian Verse 1972; (p. 27-53)

Explores the passage of Australian poetry from 1788 to the early 1970s, discussing why the anthology focuses on 'articulate, personal poetry', and is weighted toward the fruitful period after 1930. Highlights important themes and concerns of Australian poetry - the quest for an Antipodean Eden, the pursuit of Romantic idealism within a strongly secular culture, and the need to define an Australian vision and identity against English culture - and assesses the individual contributions of major poets.

y White Vanishing : A Settler Australian Hegemonic Textual Strategy, 1789-2006 Elspeth Tilley , St Lucia : 2007 Z1408578 2007 single work thesis 'This thesis conducts a discourse analysis of the 'white vanishing trope' - stories about white Australians who become lost or disappear - in white Australian texts from 1789 to 2006...[T]he white vanishing trope narrates a specific, and remarkably constant, relationship between indigenous bodies, white bodies, time, and space, in which white settlers are victims and survivors, whose occupation of Australia is constructed as inevitable and right.' - from author's abstract (p.ix)
Charles Harpur and the Warp : Strange Happenings in 'The Creek of Four Graves' David Brooks , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 151-165)
Learning to Love the Gum Tree Elizabeth Webby , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island , Autumn no. 120 2010; (p. 44-50)
Place, Landscape, Saussure, Region, and Two Australian Colonial Poets : Some Footnotes Kevin Magarey , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mapped but Not Known : The Australian Landscape of the Imagination : Essays and Poems Presented to Brian Elliott LXXV 11 April 1985 1986; (p. 105-127)
Sense and Nonsense J. J. Healy , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and the Aborigine in Australia 1770- 1975 1989; (p. 91-112)
The Grave in the Bush Elizabeth Webby , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tilting at Matilda : Literature, Aborigines, Women and the Church in Contemporary Australia 1994; (p. 30-38)
Charles Harpur Frederick T. Macartney , 1923 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 25 January vol. 44 no. 2241 1923; (p. 2)
Harpur and His Editor Cecil W. Salier , 1951 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 12 no. 1 1951; (p. 47-54)
God's Sublime Order in Harpur's 'The Creek of the Four Graves' Michael Ackland , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 11 no. 3 1984; (p. 355-370)
Ackland argues that the poem transcends purely descriptive categories and should be read as prophetic, blank verse narrative in the tradition of Milton and Wordsworth. Harpur portrays the struggle between reason and instinct, reenacting man's fall in the light of Miltonic parallels. Beginning in pictorial terms, like much of Harpur's verse, the poem proceeds towards the greater issues of spirituality and salvation through an experience of the sublime.
"They couldn't tell us how to farm their skin" : White Poems on Black Dispossession Geoff Page , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interactions : Essays on the Literature and Culture of the Asia-Pacific Region 2000; (p. 171-183)
Analyses poems by white Australian authors about dispossession of their land. In his survey of attitudes and poetic technique, Page examines nineteenth and twentieth century poems and finds a reversal of attitudes over time.
Ballad and Lyric in Australian Poetry Nelson Wattie , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 10 no. 1 1987; (p. 68-76)
The Terrors of "Terra Nullius" : Gothicising and De-Gothicising Aboriginality Penny Van Toorn , 1992-1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: World Literature Written in English , vol. 32, no2-33, no.1 no. 1992-1993; (p. 87-97)
The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Charles Harpur Anonymous , 1875 single work column
— Appears in: The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser , 28 May vol. 35 no. 4017 1875; (p. 4)
Is There an Australian Pastoral Poetry? Andrew Taylor , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November no. 14 2015; (p. 38-51)
Pastoral was common as a European literary genre from the Renaissance until the eighteenth century. It existed in other artistic forms as well, especially in the visual arts, and after its demise as a distinct genre elements of it persisted into the twentieth century, for example in music. With the colonial spread of European culture the pastoral influence also extended into other countries, with a mixed fate. Recently, the term Pastoral has come back into prominence in literature in English, not only in Great Britain but also, notably in the USA and Australia, with the growth of writing motivated by ecological involvement with the natural world, especially landscape. This has led to re-definitions of the term Pastoral in the last few decades. A number of Australian poets are looked at to see whether, and how, their writing about landscape might relate to, or incorporate elements of the Pastoral. The Australian poet John Kinsella, in particular, has been a widely published spokesperson for a new definition of Pastoral. His published works trace his move from a politically activist anti-colonialist redefinition of Pastoral towards a quieter, more harmonious, and essentially ethical engagement with the natural world.
Last amended 7 Jan 2013 11:13:51
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