y The Haunted Station single work   short story   horror   mystery  
Issue Details: First known date: 1894 1894
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Haunted Station and Other Stories Hume Nisbet , London : F. V. White , 1894 Z1011869 1894 selected work short story London : F. V. White , 1894
  • Appears in:
    y Perturbed Spirits R. C. Bull (editor), London : Arthur Barker , 1954 Z1926069 1954 anthology short story horror London : Arthur Barker , 1954 pg. 233-254
  • Appears in:
    y Tales of Horror Charles Higham , Melbourne London : Horwitz , 1962 Z1728748 1962 anthology short story horror Melbourne London : Horwitz , 1962 pg. 61-85
  • Appears in:
    y Tales from a Gas-Lit Graveyard Hugh Lamb (editor), London : W. H. Allen , 1979 Z1926102 1979 anthology short story horror London : W. H. Allen , 1979 pg. 9-28
  • Appears in:
    y Tales From Beyond The Grave London : Octopus Publishing Group , 1982 Z1926113 1982 anthology short story fantasy horror

    Twenty-seven tales of horror and the fantastic from some of speculative fiction's leading authors, including: Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Graves, Ray Bradbury, H. G. Wells, Hume Nisbett, J. R. R. Tolkien, Guy de Maupassant, Nikolai Gogol, Artrhur Conan Doyle, Robert Bloch, Mark Twain, Elizabeth Gaskell, E. M. Forster, Charles Dickens, and Oscar Wilde.

    London : Octopus Publishing Group , 1982
    pg. 33-48
  • Appears in:
    y Dead Witness : Best Australian Mystery Stories Stephen Knight (editor), Ringwood : Penguin , 1989 Z100512 1989 anthology short story crime mystery Ringwood : Penguin , 1989 pg. 61-82
  • Appears in:
    y Impressions : West Coast Fiction 1829-1988 Peter Cowan (editor), Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1989 Z178100 1989 anthology short story extract humour Short stories and extracts from novels by Western Australian writers (visitors and residents) representing a wide range of changing responses to place over time. Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1989 pg. 43-58
  • Appears in:
    y The Oxford Book of Australian Ghost Stories Ken Gelder (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1994 Z356827 1994 anthology short story crime young adult 'Did Australian ghosts suffer from a cultural cringe? Dr Ken Gelder indicates in the introduction to another fascinating OUP anthology that early ghost stories were essentially a "transported genre" that looked back to England as their source. Thus John Lang's well-known story "The Ghost upon the Rail" is based upon a case of murder for post-convict wealth. Gelder argues that Australian ghost stories possess their own ironical flavour, but the gothic tradition has to be resolved in outback locations or deserted mining towns, as in David Rowbotham's "A Schoolie and the Ghost".'

    'Gelder relies heavily on Victorian and Edwardian writers, such as Marcus Clarke, Barbara Baynton and Hume Nisbet, as if unsure as to the nature of contemporary ghosts. It is interesting to see that Australia's science fiction writers, such as Lucy Sussex and Terry Dowling, provide the link between the past and the present. Dowling's "The Daeman Street Ghost-Trap" effectively uses traditional settings to link ghosts with a current horror, namely cancer. Several bunyip stories remind us of a particular Antipodean creature to stand against the assorted European manifestations.'

    (Colin Steele, SF Commentary No 77, p.55).


    Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1994
    pg. 110-126
  • Appears in:
    y The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction Ken Gelder (editor), Rachael Weaver (editor), Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2007 Z1415120 2007 anthology short story extract horror mystery science fiction historical fiction children's (taught in 7 units) Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2007 pg. 173-192

Works about this Work

National Hauntings: The Architecture of Australian Ghost Stories David Crouch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 94-105)

Echoing Judith Wright, David Crouch identifies two twisted strands in the Australian postcolonial condition - a love of the land and an invader's guilt. This 'non-indigenous desire to belong to a stolen land' gives the Australian ghost story 'a particular resonance ... In this country the presence of ghosts can be read as traces of historical traumas, fears which are often exposed in expressions of apprehensive (un)settlement.' Crouch aims to draw out some reflections on this perturbance in the Australian consciousness 'by reading Hume Nisbet's mobilisation of a phantasmic topology in his story "The Haunted Station" alongside the unsettling ghosts of Tim Winton's Cloudstreet.

Crouch concludes, in part, that both stories 'seem concerned with the continuity and legitimacy of settlement'. The haunted houses in both tales 'navigate the tensions surrounding the occupation of place in Australia' and both are 'undercut by the awareness of displaced indigenous habitation and suggest a moral disturbance in the non-indigenous Australian relationship with place'. It is conceivable, Crouch argues, that 'the ghost story itself is a way of silencing an indigenous presence within a discursive structure that asserts the legitimacy of non-indigenous occupation.'

National Hauntings: The Architecture of Australian Ghost Stories David Crouch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 94-105)

Echoing Judith Wright, David Crouch identifies two twisted strands in the Australian postcolonial condition - a love of the land and an invader's guilt. This 'non-indigenous desire to belong to a stolen land' gives the Australian ghost story 'a particular resonance ... In this country the presence of ghosts can be read as traces of historical traumas, fears which are often exposed in expressions of apprehensive (un)settlement.' Crouch aims to draw out some reflections on this perturbance in the Australian consciousness 'by reading Hume Nisbet's mobilisation of a phantasmic topology in his story "The Haunted Station" alongside the unsettling ghosts of Tim Winton's Cloudstreet.

Crouch concludes, in part, that both stories 'seem concerned with the continuity and legitimacy of settlement'. The haunted houses in both tales 'navigate the tensions surrounding the occupation of place in Australia' and both are 'undercut by the awareness of displaced indigenous habitation and suggest a moral disturbance in the non-indigenous Australian relationship with place'. It is conceivable, Crouch argues, that 'the ghost story itself is a way of silencing an indigenous presence within a discursive structure that asserts the legitimacy of non-indigenous occupation.'

Last amended 15 Mar 2013 10:49:11
Settings:
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,
  • Bush,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X