y The Illustrated Treasury of Australian Verse anthology   poetry   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1984 1984
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Nelson , 1984 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Wild Colonial Boyi"'Tis of a wild Colonial boy, Jack Doolan was his name", 1905 single work poetry

'The Wild Colonial Boy' is a traditional Irish/Australian ballad of which there are many different versions. It has been argued that the original version was really about Jack Donahoe (variously spelled Donahoo or Donahue), an Irish transport who arrived at Sydney Cove in 1825, and was subsequently convicted of highway robbery and sentenced to death. He escaped and waged a guerrilla war against the wealthy for more than two years in the country around Sydney. On September 1st 1830 he was ambushed by a police party near Cambelltown and shot dead, his companions Webber and Warmsley escaping into the bush. This version was eventually outlawed as seditious so the name of the protagonist changed.

The resulting Irish version is about a young emigrant, named Jack Duggan, who left the town of Castlemaine, County Kerry, Ireland, for Australia in the 1800s. According to the song (and in keeping with the true story of Jack Donahoe), he spent his time there 'robbing from the rich to feed the poor'. In the song, the protagonist is fatally wounded in an ambush when his heart is pierced by the bullet of Fitzroy.

The Australian version has Jack Doolan (or sometimes Jack Dowling) as the protagonist, and here Castlemaine refers to the Australian town in Victoria. In both versions variation in the wording and language occurs across different sources.

In his Old Bush Songs, Banjo Patterson wrote: "it will be noticed that the same chorus is sung to both 'The Wild Colonial Boy' and 'Bold Jack Donahoo'. Several versions of both songs were sent in, but the same chorus was always made to do duty for both songs." This chorus, included in some (not all) Australian versions is as follows:


Come, all my hearties,

we'll roam the mountains high,

Together we will plunder,

together we will die.

We'll wander over valleys,

and gallop over plains,

And we'll scorn to live in

slavery, bound down with iron chains.

(p. 17-18)
Down Where the Coolibahs Growi"A strapping young stockman lay dying,", Horace A. Flower , 1885 single work poetry (p. 18-19)
Click Go the Shears : An Australian Balladi"Out on the board the old shearer stands", 1954 single work poetry (p. 20-21)
The Eumeralla Shorei"There's a happy little valley on the Eumeralla shore,", 1861 single work poetry (p. 21-22)
Note: Attributed to 'Cockatoo Jack.' With title: The Numerella Shore.
Bold Jack Donahoei"'Twas of a valiant highwayman and outlaw of disdain", 1956-1964 single work poetry (p. 23-24)
From : Ye Wearie Wayfarer : (Finis Exoptatus)i"Hark! the bells on distant cattle", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1904 extract poetry (p. 24-25)
The Sick Stockrideri"Hold hard, Ned! lift me down once more, and lay me in the shade,", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1869 single work poetry The Sick Stock-Rider (p. 26-27)
A Mid-Summer Noon in the Australian Foresti"Not a bird disturbs the air,", Charles Harpur , 1851 single work poetry A Midsummer Noon in the Australian Forest (p. 29)
Bell-Birdsi"By channels of coolness the echoes are calling,", Henry Kendall , 1867 single work poetry (p. 30-31)
From: September in Australiai"Grey winter hath gone, like a wearisome guest,", Henry Kendall , 1984 extract poetry (p. 31)
The Last of His Tribei"He crouches, and buries his face on his knees,", Henry Kendall , 1864 single work poetry (p. 32-33)
How M'Dougal Topped the Scorei"A peaceful spot is Piper's Flat. The folk that live around-", Thos. E. Spencer , 1898 single work poetry humour (p. 33-35)
Where the Pelican Buildsi"The horses were ready, the rails were down,", Mary Hannay Foott , 1881 single work poetry Where the Pelican Builds Her Nest (p. 36)
Nine Miles from Gundagaii"I've done my share of shearing sheep,", Jack Moses , 1923 single work poetry (p. 36-37)
The Call of the Cityi"There is a saying of renown -", Victor J. Daley , 1905 single work poetry (p. 38-39)
Waltzing Matilda : Carrying a Swagi"Oh! there once was a swagman camped in the billabong,", A. B. Paterson , 1895 single work poetry (p. 40)
The Man from Snowy Riveri"There was movement at the station, for the word had passed around", A. B. Paterson , 1890 single work poetry (p. 41-43)
The Man from Ironbarki"It was the man from Ironbark who struck the Sydney town,", A. B. Paterson , 1892 single work poetry humour (p. 44-45)
The Travelling Post Officei"The roving breezes come and go, the reed beds sweep and sway", A. B. Paterson , 1894 single work poetry humour (p. 45-46)
Clancy of the Overflowi"I had written him a letter which I had, for want of better", A. B. Paterson , 1889 single work poetry (p. 47-48)
* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,: State Library of New South Wales Press , 1996 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Wild Colonial Boyi"'Tis of a wild Colonial boy, Jack Doolan was his name", 1905 single work poetry

'The Wild Colonial Boy' is a traditional Irish/Australian ballad of which there are many different versions. It has been argued that the original version was really about Jack Donahoe (variously spelled Donahoo or Donahue), an Irish transport who arrived at Sydney Cove in 1825, and was subsequently convicted of highway robbery and sentenced to death. He escaped and waged a guerrilla war against the wealthy for more than two years in the country around Sydney. On September 1st 1830 he was ambushed by a police party near Cambelltown and shot dead, his companions Webber and Warmsley escaping into the bush. This version was eventually outlawed as seditious so the name of the protagonist changed.

The resulting Irish version is about a young emigrant, named Jack Duggan, who left the town of Castlemaine, County Kerry, Ireland, for Australia in the 1800s. According to the song (and in keeping with the true story of Jack Donahoe), he spent his time there 'robbing from the rich to feed the poor'. In the song, the protagonist is fatally wounded in an ambush when his heart is pierced by the bullet of Fitzroy.

The Australian version has Jack Doolan (or sometimes Jack Dowling) as the protagonist, and here Castlemaine refers to the Australian town in Victoria. In both versions variation in the wording and language occurs across different sources.

In his Old Bush Songs, Banjo Patterson wrote: "it will be noticed that the same chorus is sung to both 'The Wild Colonial Boy' and 'Bold Jack Donahoo'. Several versions of both songs were sent in, but the same chorus was always made to do duty for both songs." This chorus, included in some (not all) Australian versions is as follows:


Come, all my hearties,

we'll roam the mountains high,

Together we will plunder,

together we will die.

We'll wander over valleys,

and gallop over plains,

And we'll scorn to live in

slavery, bound down with iron chains.

(p. 17-18)
Down Where the Coolibahs Growi"A strapping young stockman lay dying,", Horace A. Flower , 1885 single work poetry (p. 18-19)
Click Go the Shears : An Australian Balladi"Out on the board the old shearer stands", 1954 single work poetry (p. 20-21)
Bold Jack Donahoei"'Twas of a valiant highwayman and outlaw of disdain", 1956-1964 single work poetry (p. 23-24)
From : Ye Wearie Wayfarer : (Finis Exoptatus)i"Hark! the bells on distant cattle", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1904 extract poetry (p. 24-25)
The Sick Stockrideri"Hold hard, Ned! lift me down once more, and lay me in the shade,", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1869 single work poetry The Sick Stock-Rider (p. 26-27)
A Mid-Summer Noon in the Australian Foresti"Not a bird disturbs the air,", Charles Harpur , 1851 single work poetry A Midsummer Noon in the Australian Forest (p. 29)
Bell-Birdsi"By channels of coolness the echoes are calling,", Henry Kendall , 1867 single work poetry (p. 30-31)
From: September in Australiai"Grey winter hath gone, like a wearisome guest,", Henry Kendall , 1984 extract poetry (p. 31)
The Last of His Tribei"He crouches, and buries his face on his knees,", Henry Kendall , 1864 single work poetry (p. 32-33)
How M'Dougal Topped the Scorei"A peaceful spot is Piper's Flat. The folk that live around-", Thos. E. Spencer , 1898 single work poetry humour (p. 33-35)
Nine Miles from Gundagaii"I've done my share of shearing sheep,", Jack Moses , 1923 single work poetry (p. 36-37)
The Call of the Cityi"There is a saying of renown -", Victor J. Daley , 1905 single work poetry (p. 38-39)
Waltzing Matilda : Carrying a Swagi"Oh! there once was a swagman camped in the billabong,", A. B. Paterson , 1895 single work poetry (p. 40)
The Man from Snowy Riveri"There was movement at the station, for the word had passed around", A. B. Paterson , 1890 single work poetry (p. 41-43)
The Man from Ironbarki"It was the man from Ironbark who struck the Sydney town,", A. B. Paterson , 1892 single work poetry humour (p. 44-45)
The Travelling Post Officei"The roving breezes come and go, the reed beds sweep and sway", A. B. Paterson , 1894 single work poetry humour (p. 45-46)
Clancy of the Overflowi"I had written him a letter which I had, for want of better", A. B. Paterson , 1889 single work poetry (p. 47-48)
Over the Rangei"Little bush maiden, wondering-eyed,", A. B. Paterson , 1895 single work poetry (p. 48-49)
The Women of the Westi"They left the vine-wreathed cottage and the mansion on the hill,", George Essex Evans , 1901 single work poetry (p. 50-51)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Gracious Gifts of the Poets of Battle Clement Semmler , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 January 1985; (p. 12)

— Review of The Illustrated Treasury of Australian Verse 1984 anthology poetry biography
Poems Down the Middle Stuart Sayers , 1984 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Age , 24 November 1984; (p. 16)
Gracious Gifts of the Poets of Battle Clement Semmler , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 January 1985; (p. 12)

— Review of The Illustrated Treasury of Australian Verse 1984 anthology poetry biography
Poems Down the Middle Stuart Sayers , 1984 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Age , 24 November 1984; (p. 16)
Last amended 14 Jul 2009 13:25:02
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