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This image has been sourced from online.
4208942432355375851.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
3780783794675752209.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
y Eucalyptus : A Novel single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998 1998
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Holland lived with his only daughter, Ellen, by a khaki river four hours west of Sydney. In spite of their remote location, tales of Ellen's beauty had traveled long distances and in the process inscribed a small legend. But Ellen's desirability was Holland's blindspot and finally he decided that the man who correctly named every eucalypt on his property would win the hand of his daughter. (Source: Trove)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 1998 .
      8722067227702396850.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 255p.
      ISBN: 1875847634 (hbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Harvill Press , 1998 .
      3780783794675752209.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 264p.
      ISBN: 1860464947
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Farrar Straus and Giroux , 1998 .
      4208942432355375851.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 255p.
      ISBN: 0374148570 (alk. paper)
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1998 .
      Extent: 255p.
      Edition info: 1st Canadian ed.
      ISBN: 0676972373 (pbk), 0676971776
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Harvill Press , 1999 .
      6702880556351381964.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 264p.
      ISBN: 1860464955
    • San Diego, California,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Harcourt Brace , 1999 .
      2300985769816017859.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 261p.
      ISBN: 0156007819
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ambo/Anthos , 1998 .
      8688723820441906886.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 269p.
      ISBN: 9041402861
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Flamingo , 2001 .
      18195553955907753.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 233p.
      ISBN: 9041405526

Works about this Work

Viaxes Literarias E Culturais Entre Galicia E Australia María Jesús Lorenzo Modia , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rosendo Salvado Eo Aborixe of Australia 2015; (p. 209-228)
Trees That “Grow on You” : Naturalist Taxonomy and Ecopoetics of Interrelatedness in Murray Bail’s Eucalyptus Jessica Maufort , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 5 2015; (p. 11-31)
'Investigating transcultural encounters between Europe and Australia in Murray Bail's Eucalyptus through an ecocritical lens, this essay re-evaluates the act of naming trees with regard to the status of the character symbolically called Holland. Critics have underlined how, in colonial contexts, the naturalist taxonomy of the environment partakes of the settlers' conquest of new colonies: Jamaica Kincaid's assertion 'to name is to possess' crystallises this cultural process of ecological imperialism. While I acknowledge this phenomenon, a re-appraisal of the naming practice in Eucalyptus allows us to transcend the legacy of polarised colonial and anthropocentric perspectives. Holland's status may be interpreted positively in view of Neil Evernden's concept of 'man-in-environment': if so, the act of naming represents the individual's constructive attempt at establishing a sense of place within a new territory. Bail's protagonists exemplify different stages in this process of interrelatedness between the human and non-human realms, one which resists a conventional subject-object relationship. Whereas the ambivalent Holland embodies a factual and existential naturalism, the imaginative approach to the treescape of his daughter Ellen and her storytelling suitor fully emancipates them from the commodifying effect of Holland's naming competition. Bail's aesthetics reflects the dissolving boundary between the self and environment: deployed in the suitor's fable-like stories and Bail's rich prose, the ecopoetic devices of anthropomorphism and zoomorphism defy the rational laws of Western realism. This ecopoetics of interrelatedness restores the agency of the eucalypts while negating the concept of a traditionally dominant human presence in the environment. In Eucalyptus, taxonomy reveals the reciprocal dynamics of a genuine interpenetration: Holland's 'bush garden' becomes a global space that combines European (symbolised by Holland and the stories) and Australian (the eucalypts) identities. Thus, Bail projects a creative site of transcultural dialogue at the level of the terrain through the complementary processes of physical and subjective interrelatedness.' (Publication abstract)
Morality at Bay : The Lesson of the Americas in Murray Bail's Homesickness Michael Ackland , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 28 no. 2 2014; (p. 275-288, 535.)
'For four decades Murray Bail's writing has been at the forefront of inventive and intellectual challenging Australian fiction, yet his preoccupations remain elusive, his works enigmatic. His first book, Contemporary Portraits and Other Stories, signalled the arrival of a major talent, an expectation matched by subsequent award-winning novels, such as Homesickness and Eucalyptus. His work, however, has been often accused of inventiveness for its own sake. Here, Ackland discusses Bail's Homesickness.' (Publication summary)
Literary Guide to Australia Nicholas Shakespeare , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Telegraph , 10 July 2013;
'We asked some of the world's most eminent writers to offer literary tours of the places they know best.'
'On All Fours Passing, Tintinnabulation' : Murray Bail's Creative Case against the Imperial Word Michael Ackland , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Tapestry of the Creative Word in Anglophone Literatures 2013; (p. 231-240)
Empathic Deterritorialisation : Re-Mapping the Postcolonial Novel in Creative Writing Classrooms A. Frances Johnson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Michael Dodson has commented that the 'repossession of our past is the repossession of ourselves' - yet since the 1980s, the translation of such imperatives within literary and historical colonial archival research has been tightly circumscribed by controversial, often agonistic identity debates. Reflection on the broad emotional imprimateurs guiding intellectual and creative research activity have been muted, variously repressed or backgrounded, voided by (white) shame or tact, and often deferred to Indigenous commentators for framing commentaries. Vehement stoushes between the disciplinary cousins of history and literature have also erupted as part of recent local history and culture wars debates. With hindsight, these seemingly 'emotional' yet supra-rational debates, focusing righteously on entitlement and access to colonial archives, seem to have lacked so-called emotional intelligence and (inter)disciplinary imagination. The arguments of the protagonists have now have been 'tidied away', leaving a subsidence of unscholarly embarrassment in their wake.

I aim to show that despite the problematic inheritance of these public debates, many historians, novelists and cultural critics (Elspeth Probyn, the late Greg Dening, Kate Grenville, Kim Scott and others) have managed to rigorously contest and (re)present colonial archival material without repudiating their own emotional involvement with 'the Australian past' in order to maintain scholarly distance. They have understood, in Marcia Langton's phrase, that 'some of us have lived through it, are living through it. This is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.' My analysis of these writer's commentaries will be contextualised against Langton's idea of intercultural subjectivity, which emphasises a discursive intextuality that can be engaged with equally by black and white artists, critics and writers across the genres. Langton, Dening, Grenville, Scott and others will be shown as thinkers who lead the way in suggesting and/or demonstrating how postcolonial novels can be taught and made.' (Author's abstract)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
What Tree Is That? : Eucalyptus by Murray Bail Chester Eagle , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Well in the Shadow : A Writer's Journey through Australian Literature 2010; (p. 295-313)
'A man with no name snatches the prize from Mr Cave in a book of endless deception: is there anything we can take as certain?' (Author's note.)
The Long Hand of Murray Bail : Travel and Writing Paul Sharrad , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 25-36)
'In this paper Paul Sharrad suggests that Murray Bail 'could not have produced most of his work without journeying abroad, and that his book of travel observations, Longhand, offers insights into one particular kind of 'journeying' as well as his reliance on material picked up along his journeying out from and back to Australia. While he began serious writing around the age of 19 in his native South Australia, and composed some other stories during his years in Melbourne working in advertising, Bail did not really get going as a published writer until he had been overseas for several years, first in India and then England and Europe. His jottings in Longhand: a Writer's Notebook, show on the one hand, how his sense of being a writer affects his recording of the travel experience, and secondly, how much his travels have had an impact on his fiction.'' (25-26)
Telling Trees: Eucalyptus, 'Anon,' and the Growth of Co-Evolutionary Histories Shelley Saguaro , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mosaic , September vol. 42 no. 3 2009; (p. 39-56)
'A new poetics is evident in a developing genre named here as "co-evolutionary histories." This essay considers the relation of oral and written traditions to landscape and trees with reference to Murray Bail's novel Eucalyptus and Virginia Woolf's 'Anon.'' (p. 39)
Modesty Prevails Susan Wyndham , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28-29 June 2008; (p. 32-33) The Age , 28 June 2008; (p. 26-27)
Criticism and Fiction in Australia Ken Gelder , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 192 2008; (p. 71-76)
This paper is a reworked version of Ken Gelder's presentation for his debate with Peter Craven during the 2008 Sydney Writers' Festival.
Six Great Cover Ideas W. H. Chong , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 67 no. 3 2008; (p. 19-24)
Heroes and Mirrors : The Presence of Corunna in Murray Bail's Eucalyptus and Sally Morgan's My Place A Coruna na literatura australiana contemporanea : Eucalyptus de Murray Bail e My Place de Sally Morgan María Jesus Cabarcos Traseira , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and Galicia : Defeating the Tyranny of Distance 2008; (p. 257-273)
'This paper traces the steps that have taken the toponymic 'Corunna' (a location in North-Western Spain, spelled 'Coruna' in Spanish) to the Australian works Eucalyptus (1998), by Murray Bail, and My Place (1987), by Sally Morgan.' (p. 257)
"Stories That Take Root Become Like Things, Misshapen Things." Murray Bail's Eucalyptus : Contesting Traditional Narratives about the Land and Women in Australia? "Stories That Take Root Become Like Things, Misshapen Things." Murray Bail's Eucalyptus: cuestionando narrativas tradicionais sobre a terra e a muller en Australia? Cristina Fernandez Mendez , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and Galicia : Defeating the Tyranny of Distance 2008; (p. 291-307)
Estranging an Icon : Eucalyptus and India Paul Sharrad , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies , March vol. 9 no. 1 2007; (p. 31-48)
'In its broadest context, this paper inspects historical connections between Australia and India under colonialism. It works with the general idea that the heavily textual /literary emphasis of postcolonial studies to date is usefully informed by paying attention to material culture and historical movements. Australian literature is read against/through work on ethnobotany, forest management and anthropology. Murray Bail's novel Eucalyptus suggests an ambiguous treatment of the 'bush' model of Australian cultural tradition as constructed in this nation's literature. References to the colonial dissemination of eucalyptus plants across the globe hint at unspoken stories and position modern Australia as both national-local and global. These references prompt an investigation of the history and tensions of introducing eucalypts to India, initially in the Nilgiri region of Madras Presidency, revealing the relative silence from the South in the general context of Subaltern Studies historicizing. In turn, the details of the Nilgiri story reflect on the novel, exposing its reprocessing of settler myths and silencing of Aboriginal alternatives.' (Author's abstract)
Parodying Patriarchy : Murray Bail's Eucalyptus and the 'Logic' of Domination Amanda Rooks , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , November-December no. 34 2007; (p. 24-33)
Landscaping and Narrating White Australian-Ness in Murray Bail's Eucalyptus María Jesus Cabarcos Traseira , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oral and Written Narratives and Cultural Identity : Interdisciplinary Approaches 2007; (p. 189-201)
Let's Talk About the V-Word Jane Sullivan , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 30 April 2006; (p. 16)
Trees for Life Deborah Bogle , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 June 2006; (p. 11)
Untitled Margaret Clunies Ross , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 1 2003; (p. 220-222)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Margaret Cluines Ross reviews the icelandic translation of Murray Bail's novel Eucalyptus.
Our Stories, Ourselves Penelope Nelson , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , July-August vol. 42 no. 7-8 1998; (p. 115-116)

— Review of The Chosen David Ireland 1997 single work novel ; Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Coming Soon 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 26 April 1998; (p. 23)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Tree of Family Life Blooms in Love Story Katharine England , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 14 February 1998; (p. 19)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Seduced by a Story A. P. Riemer , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2 May 1998; (p. 11)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Out of the Woods Brian Matthews , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 May 1998; (p. 11)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
The Trees of Life Penelope Nelson , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 May vol. 117 no. 6123 1998; (p. 77)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
The Trees of Man Laurie Clancy , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 16 May 1998; (p. 22)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
The Tree Doesn't Grow Helen Daniel , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 June 1998; (p. 8)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
By Gum Michael McGirr , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , June vol. 8 no. 5 1998; (p. 36)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Pick of the Week Sue Bond , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 4 July 1998; (p. 9)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Planting Australia Stephen Henighan , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 3 July no. 4970 1998; (p. 19)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Built on the Abyss Peter Craven , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 201 1998; (p. 27-28)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Dun and Gum Nicholas Jose , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 16 June vol. 20 no. 14 1998; (p. 20-21)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Enchanted Forest Michael Upchurch , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 4 October 1998; (p. 6)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Eucalyptus Jan McKemmish , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 57 no. 4 1998; (p. 828-831)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Gum Tree Fantasy Ray Verrills , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 154 1999; (p. 112-114)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Bookclub Bridget Brooklyn , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times Sunday Times , 26 March 2000; (p. 18)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Bookclub Patricia Georgee , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times Sunday Times , 26 March 2000; (p. 18)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
Bookclub Robert Boden , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times Sunday Times , 26 March 2000; (p. 18)

— Review of Eucalyptus : A Novel Murray Bail 1998 single work novel
The Cosmopolitan Pastoral : The Paddock, the Novel, and the Nation Robert Beardwood , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century 2001; (p. [10]-20)

Using Murray Bail's Eucalyptus and Nicholas Jose's The Custodians Robert Beardwood shows how Australian writing reflects concerns of claims to place and tensions between longing and belonging, Australian place and Australian identity at the end of the 20th century.

Happily Ever After: William Shakespeare's The Tempest and Murray Bail's Eucalyptus Rebecca McNeer , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 16 no. 2 2002; (p. 171-176)

McNeer compares elements of similarity in Murray Bail's Eucalyptus and William Shakespeare's The Tempest. McNeer particularly examines fables, fairy tales and mythic stories that may have been available to Shakespeare and, derivatively, influenced Bail. The characters of Miranda in The Tempest and Ellen in Eucalyptus are compared as are their respective fathers, Prospero and Holland.

McNeer concludes with a quotation from G. Wilson Knight's The Crown of Life: Essays in Interpretation of Shakespeare's Final Plays (1965): 'It is, perhaps, inevitable that Shakespeare, so saturated with the spirit of his land, should, in such a summation of that work in The Tempest, have outlined, among much else, a myth of the national soul' (p.255). This parting comment, says McNeer, 'may provide the most profound connection of all between William Shakespeare and Murray Bail'.

Eucalyptus Michele Albaret-Maatsch , 2003 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 1 2003; (p. 62-64)
Surveying a Novel Trend Russell Wenholz , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 11 July 2004; (p. 19)
Detourism : Murray Bail's Photographic Fiction John Attridge , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 39 no. 3 2004; (p. 69-91)
The article draws parallels between Roland Barthes' theory of photography and Murray Bail's photographic techniques in Homesickness and Eucalyptus.
Open Books, Closed Minds Louise Adler , 2004 single work essay
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 December 2004; (p. 9)
The reluctance of Australian writers to participate in vigorous political debate is discussed in this article.
Taking a Leaf from Another Book Malcolm Knox , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5-6 February 2005; (p. 1, 2)
Reports on Murray Bail's oversight in not citing Stan Kelly, George Chippendale and Robert Johnson's 1969 botanical work Eucalyptus as a reference source for his novel of the same name. Bail will ask his publisher, Text Publishing, to include an acknowledgement in future editions of the novel.
The Wood from the Trees : Taxonomy and the Eucalypt as the New National Hero in Recent Australian Writing Susan K. Martin , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 81-94)
Explores the cultural circulation of the Eucalyptus as represented in a variety of recent Australian texts.
The Book was Better Susan Wyndham , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 9 April 2005; (p. 5)
Scandals Among Australian Writers - Again 2005 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , March vol. 84 no. 8 2005; (p. 7)
Let's Talk About the V-Word Jane Sullivan , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 30 April 2006; (p. 16)
Trees for Life Deborah Bogle , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 June 2006; (p. 11)
Politics and Monomania Ken Gelder , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 184 2006; (p. 48-56)
Natural and Cultural Landscape of Australia in Murray Bail's Eucalyptus R. C. Sheila Royappa , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Explorations in Australian Literature 2006; (p. 51-57)
Estranging an Icon : Eucalyptus and India Paul Sharrad , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies , March vol. 9 no. 1 2007; (p. 31-48)
'In its broadest context, this paper inspects historical connections between Australia and India under colonialism. It works with the general idea that the heavily textual /literary emphasis of postcolonial studies to date is usefully informed by paying attention to material culture and historical movements. Australian literature is read against/through work on ethnobotany, forest management and anthropology. Murray Bail's novel Eucalyptus suggests an ambiguous treatment of the 'bush' model of Australian cultural tradition as constructed in this nation's literature. References to the colonial dissemination of eucalyptus plants across the globe hint at unspoken stories and position modern Australia as both national-local and global. These references prompt an investigation of the history and tensions of introducing eucalypts to India, initially in the Nilgiri region of Madras Presidency, revealing the relative silence from the South in the general context of Subaltern Studies historicizing. In turn, the details of the Nilgiri story reflect on the novel, exposing its reprocessing of settler myths and silencing of Aboriginal alternatives.' (Author's abstract)
Love and Mourning in Australia Chiti Das , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indian Journal of World Literature and Culture , July-December vol. 2 no. 2006; (p. 31-40)
Parodying Patriarchy : Murray Bail's Eucalyptus and the 'Logic' of Domination Amanda Rooks , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , November-December no. 34 2007; (p. 24-33)
Modesty Prevails Susan Wyndham , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28-29 June 2008; (p. 32-33) The Age , 28 June 2008; (p. 26-27)
Criticism and Fiction in Australia Ken Gelder , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 192 2008; (p. 71-76)
This paper is a reworked version of Ken Gelder's presentation for his debate with Peter Craven during the 2008 Sydney Writers' Festival.
Six Great Cover Ideas W. H. Chong , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 67 no. 3 2008; (p. 19-24)

Awards

2010 shortlisted Australian Book Review Fan Poll
1999 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize South-East Asia and South Pacific Region Best Book from the Region Award
1999 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize Overall Best Book Award
1999 winner Miles Franklin Literary Award
1999 winner ASAL Awards ALS Gold Medal
Last amended 13 Mar 2015 14:08:16
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