Solitary Confinement single work   poetry   "Have you ever been ordered to strip"
Issue Details: First known date: 1981 1981
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Up, Not Down, Mate! : Thoughts from a Prison Cell Robert Walker , West Torrens area : Catholic Chaplaincy to Aborigines , 1981 Z1707880 1981 selected work poetry 'Robbie Walker was born in Port Augusta, a member of a family of twelve children. He is of Aboriginal descent. The family moved around a during his early years and he attended different schools. His education was disrupted by clashes with the law from his early teens, and he attained only First Year High School standard. Since then Robbie has been in and out of Boy's Homes and Gaol. Whilst in Gaol he began to write down his feelings. This booklet is a selection of those writings.' (Source: back cover) Sighted 13/07/2010. West Torrens area : Catholic Chaplaincy to Aborigines , 1981 pg. 6-7
  • Appears in:
    y Inside Black Australia : An Anthology of Aboriginal Poetry Kevin Gilbert (editor), Ringwood : Penguin , 1988 Z372806 1988 anthology poetry (taught in 3 units)

    'Inside Black Australia', is the first anthology of Aboriginal poetry to be published, it contains 150 poems by more than 40 Aboriginal writers and poets.

    Ringwood : Penguin , 1988
    pg. 128-129
  • Appears in:
    y Survival In Our Own Land : 'Aboriginal' Experiences in 'South Australia' since 1836, told by Nungas and others Christobel Mattingley (editor), Ken Hampton (editor), Adelaide : Wakefield Press , 1988 Z873884 1988 anthology poetry prose biography autobiography correspondence lyric/song oral history

    'Survival In Our Own Land presents history in 'South Australia' for the first time from the point of view of Nungas, as many 'Aborigines' call themselves, showing Goonyas, as Europeans are called, as the invaders.

    Almost 150 Nungas have told how the Goonya invasion and implementation of Goonya law and policy have affected us. Fifty years ago for 'South Australia's' centenary we were a chapter in a Goonya book. Now we are our own books.

    The stories, in prose and poetry, speak volumes of much that has been previously omitted from history and textbooks. Many have been told for the first time for this book. Extracts from Goonya archival documents, many never before published, have also been included to illustrate Goonya attitudes and actions which have caused the deaths of many of our people and the destruction of much of our culture.' (Source: Back Cover)

    Adelaide : Wakefield Press , 1988
    pg. 68
  • Appears in:
    y Contemporary Australian Poetry : An Anthology John Leonard (editor), Knoxfield : Houghton Mifflin , 1990 Z361533 1990 anthology poetry humour war literature Knoxfield : Houghton Mifflin , 1990 pg. 212-213
  • Appears in:
    y Spirit Song : A Collection of Aboriginal Poetry Lorraine Mafi-Williams , Norwood : Omnibus Books , 1993 Z430576 1993 anthology poetry

    'In this collection of contemporary poems for children, thirty-five Aboriginal poets write about what it means to be Aboriginal today. Many of the poems reflect the anger, despair and determination of a people dispossessed of their land and denied justice. Some poets recall the spirituality and culture of their ancestors. Still others look with hope to the future...' (Source: Back cover)

    Norwood : Omnibus Books , 1993
    pg. 56-57
  • Appears in:
    y The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse Les Murray (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1986 Z427532 1986 anthology poetry South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 405-406

Works about this Work

Last amended 16 Oct 2015 19:49:02
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