The Vision of the Rock single work   poetry   "I sate upon a lonely peak,"
Is part of Selections from Australian Poets 1849 series - publisher poetry
  • Author: Charles Harpur http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/harpur-charles
Composed: Singleton area, Hunter Valley, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,
Issue Details: First known date: 1842 1842
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'On the future freedom and prosperity of Australia.' (Webby)

Notes

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Comprises 108 lines
Notes:
Comprises 72 lines
Notes:
Editor's note: A stirring breath of prophecy is in the following beautiful poem, by Harpur ; and a picturesqueness of fancy, so to speak, which is thoroughly delightful. And what nobler theme for the young poet than the grand future of Australia? - shall not all of this verse-dream, and a thousand fold more, be realised?

Works about this Work

Charles Harpur (1813-1868) : Baptised into Independence Charles Harpur , 1998 selected work prose
— Appears in: Our First Republicans : John Dunmore Lang, Charles Harpur, Daniel Henry Deniehy : Selected Writings, 1840-1860 1998; (p. 57-111)
Contains a selection of Harpur's prose pieces, many of which originated as notes attached to poems published in newspapers and journals.
Charles Harpur's Disfiguring Origins : Allegory in Colonial Poetry Philip Mead , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 14 no. 3 1990; (p. 279-296) Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 217-240)
Mead examines the poetry of Charles Harpur in terms of the poet's attempt to move from colonial to national modes of expression. Mead proceeds by exploring the allegorical nature of some poems as signs of Harpur's attempt to exhibit the original Australian voice to which he aspired. But, allegoresis, Mead suggests, opposes the poet's romanticising of origins because of the gap between the signs of expression and the experience of the poet. What is found when one seeks "origins" in Harpur's poetry is not a "unitary or easily traceable historical origin" but the "divisions and anxieties" of Harpur's allegory.
Charles Harpur (1813-1868) : Baptised into Independence Charles Harpur , 1998 selected work prose
— Appears in: Our First Republicans : John Dunmore Lang, Charles Harpur, Daniel Henry Deniehy : Selected Writings, 1840-1860 1998; (p. 57-111)
Contains a selection of Harpur's prose pieces, many of which originated as notes attached to poems published in newspapers and journals.
Charles Harpur's Disfiguring Origins : Allegory in Colonial Poetry Philip Mead , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 14 no. 3 1990; (p. 279-296) Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 217-240)
Mead examines the poetry of Charles Harpur in terms of the poet's attempt to move from colonial to national modes of expression. Mead proceeds by exploring the allegorical nature of some poems as signs of Harpur's attempt to exhibit the original Australian voice to which he aspired. But, allegoresis, Mead suggests, opposes the poet's romanticising of origins because of the gap between the signs of expression and the experience of the poet. What is found when one seeks "origins" in Harpur's poetry is not a "unitary or easily traceable historical origin" but the "divisions and anxieties" of Harpur's allegory.
Last amended 12 Dec 2012 10:52:00
X