9071281674103519248.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott anthology   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016 2016
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Since the mid-1980s there has been a sharp rise in the number of literary publications by Indigenous Australians and in the readership and impact of those works. One contemporary Aboriginal Australian author who continues to make a contribution to both the Australian and the global canon is Kim Scott (1957-). Scott has won many awards, including Australia's highest, the prestigious Miles Franklin Award, for his novels Benang (2000) and That Deadman Dance(2011). Scott has also published in other literary genres, including poetry, the short story, children's literature, and he has written and worked professionally on Indigenous health issues. Despite Scott's national and international acclaim, there is currently no comprehensive critical companion that contextualizes his work for scholars, students, and general readers. A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott fills this void by providing a collection of twelve original essays focusing on Scott's novels, short stories, poetry, and his work with the Wirlomin Noongar language project and Indigenous health. The companion also includes an original interview with the author.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Contents

    1 Foreword

    2 Acknowledgments

    3 Note on Orthography

    4 Chronology of Key Writings

    5 Introduction

    6 Kim Scott's Publishing History in Three Contexts: Australian Aboriginal, National, and International

    7 Kim Scott's True Country as Aboriginal Bildungsroman

    8 The Land Holds All Things: Kim Scott's Benang- A Guide to Postcolonial Spatiality

    9 Kim Scott's Kayang and Me: Noongar Identity and Evidence of Connection to Country

    10 "Wreck/Con/Silly/Nation": Mimicry, Strategic Essentialism, and the "Friendly Frontier" in Kim Scott's That Deadman Dance

    11 The International Reception of Kim Scott's Works: A Case Study Featuring Benang

    12 Traumatic Landscapes: Inscribing Spectrality and Identity in Kim Scott's "A Refreshing Sleep," "Capture," and "An Intimate Act"

    13 Spatial Poetics and the Uses of Ekphrasis in Kim Scott's "Into the Light" and Other Stories

    14 The Poetry of Kim Scott

    15 The Wirlomin Project and Kim Scott: Empowering Regional Narratives in a Globalized World of Literature

    16 Kim Scott as Boundary Rider: Exploring Possibilities and New Frontiers in Aboriginal Health

    17 An Interview with Kim Scott

    18 Notes on the Contributors

    19 Index

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Rochester, New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Camden House , 2016 .
      9071281674103519248.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 204p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 30 June 2016
      ISBN: 9781571139498

Works about this Work

Through Country Bernadette Brennan , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 384 2016; (p. 19)

— Review of A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016 anthology criticism
'In 2004 Kim Scott delivered the prestigious Herbert Blaiklock Memorial Lecture to a predominantly academic audience at the University of Sydney. Provocatively, he began by saying that he did not know much about Australian literature; the literature of this country did not reflect his experiences or his sense of identity. It certainly was not the literature of his country. Scott wanted to question and complicate the categories of Australian and indigenous literature. His concern that indigenous literature was considered to be a lesser version, or subset, of our national literature had seemed to be confirmed when he located his novel Benang: From the heart (1999) in a bookshop under 'Australiana'.' (Introduction)
Through Country Bernadette Brennan , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 384 2016; (p. 19)

— Review of A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016 anthology criticism
'In 2004 Kim Scott delivered the prestigious Herbert Blaiklock Memorial Lecture to a predominantly academic audience at the University of Sydney. Provocatively, he began by saying that he did not know much about Australian literature; the literature of this country did not reflect his experiences or his sense of identity. It certainly was not the literature of his country. Scott wanted to question and complicate the categories of Australian and indigenous literature. His concern that indigenous literature was considered to be a lesser version, or subset, of our national literature had seemed to be confirmed when he located his novel Benang: From the heart (1999) in a bookshop under 'Australiana'.' (Introduction)
Last amended 6 Apr 2016 13:05:42
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