6398599859687518377.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Issue Details: First known date: 2015... 2015
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Country women and the colour bar is a timely corrective to established ideas about race relations in rural New South Wales. It reveals the untold story of grassroots efforts by Aboriginal and white women working together to make significant gains for Aboriginal communities prior to Aboriginal people’s widespread access to citizen’s rights.'

'In the 1950s and 1960s, in towns across New South Wales, specially created Aboriginal branches of the Country Women’s Association were established. Country women and the colour bar offers insights into the experience of ordinary Aboriginal and white rural women as they participated in beauty contests, cookery, handicraft lessons and baby contests. It reveals how Aboriginal assimilation policy met everyday reality as these rural women broke the rural colour bar in an unprecedented fashion and fostered cooperative campaigns for meaningful change in race-relations.' (Source: Publishers website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Aboriginal Studies Press , 2015 .
      6398599859687518377.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: xvii,229p.
      Description: illus., map, ports.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliography and index.
      • Published 1 October 2015
      ISBN: 9781925302967

Works about this Work

Lifting the Bar Liz Conor , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , June - July no. 142 2016; (p. 50-52)
'Aboriginal women avoided the restrooms of the Country Women’s Association in Kempsey. Aware that white CWA members had expressed opposition to shared facilities, the women themselves elected to steer clear of the restrooms when in town. As Jennifer Jones explains in her measured and eloquent history of Aboriginal branches of the Country Women’s Association in postwar New South Wales, the segregation of public space was endemic. From 1905 Aboriginal women delivered their babies in a screened-off corner of the ‘Aboriginal annexe’ at Kempsey Hospital. This segregation of facilities was justified by accusations of lack of hygiene and ‘questionable living habits’. In 1962 the local newspaper reported on ‘appalling conditions’ on Aboriginal stations and reserves, dwellings and standards that were described as a ‘Health menace to the Shire’. It is little wonder that the women seemed ‘shy’ and unwilling to ‘mix’. Jones’ detailed study reveals the informal and banal racism encountered daily by Aboriginal women and how they lived ‘under the strain of such petty humiliations’ as their babies being weighed on the roadside from the car boot of the nursing sister of the ‘under-utilised’ Kempsey Baby Health Centre for five years.' (Introduction)
[Review] Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Sue Taffe , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History Journal , vol. 40 no. 2016; (p. 269-271)

— Review of Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones 2015 single work criticism biography
Book Reveals CWA Activism 2015 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 16 December 2015; (p. 33)

— Review of Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones 2015 single work criticism biography
'A largely untold history of 'quiet activism' by groups of Aboriginal matriachs working with the largely conservative NSW Country Women's Associate (CWA) in the 1950s and 60s is the subject of a new book by La Trobe University academic Jennifer Jones...'
Book Reveals CWA Activism 2015 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 16 December 2015; (p. 33)

— Review of Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones 2015 single work criticism biography
'A largely untold history of 'quiet activism' by groups of Aboriginal matriachs working with the largely conservative NSW Country Women's Associate (CWA) in the 1950s and 60s is the subject of a new book by La Trobe University academic Jennifer Jones...'
[Review] Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Sue Taffe , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History Journal , vol. 40 no. 2016; (p. 269-271)

— Review of Country Women and the Colour Bar : Grassroots Activism and the Country Women’s Association Jennifer Jones 2015 single work criticism biography
Lifting the Bar Liz Conor , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , June - July no. 142 2016; (p. 50-52)
'Aboriginal women avoided the restrooms of the Country Women’s Association in Kempsey. Aware that white CWA members had expressed opposition to shared facilities, the women themselves elected to steer clear of the restrooms when in town. As Jennifer Jones explains in her measured and eloquent history of Aboriginal branches of the Country Women’s Association in postwar New South Wales, the segregation of public space was endemic. From 1905 Aboriginal women delivered their babies in a screened-off corner of the ‘Aboriginal annexe’ at Kempsey Hospital. This segregation of facilities was justified by accusations of lack of hygiene and ‘questionable living habits’. In 1962 the local newspaper reported on ‘appalling conditions’ on Aboriginal stations and reserves, dwellings and standards that were described as a ‘Health menace to the Shire’. It is little wonder that the women seemed ‘shy’ and unwilling to ‘mix’. Jones’ detailed study reveals the informal and banal racism encountered daily by Aboriginal women and how they lived ‘under the strain of such petty humiliations’ as their babies being weighed on the roadside from the car boot of the nursing sister of the ‘under-utilised’ Kempsey Baby Health Centre for five years.' (Introduction)
Last amended 11 Nov 2015 11:32:17
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