4552926417847989946.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
3679734473815082297.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
2655808328046864886.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
8234482400003409903.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
2562069256271348551.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
8434729912713798273.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Foe single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1986 1986
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In the early eighteenth century, a woman finds herself set adrift from a mutinous ship and cast ashore on a remote desert island. There she finds shelter with its only other inhabitants: a man named Cruso and his tongueless slave Friday. In time, she builds a life for herself as Cruso's companion and, eventually, his lover.' (Source: Libraries Australia)

Notes

  • Editions and translations have been updated for Foe by Eilish Copelin as part of a Semester 2, 2013 scholar's internship. The selection and inclusion of these editions and translations was based on their availability through Australian libraries, namely through the search facilities of Libraries Australia and Trove (National Library of Australia).

    Given the international popularity of Coetzee's work, however, this record is not yet comprehensive. Editions and translations not widely available in Australia may not have been indexed. Furthermore, due to the enormous breadth of critical material on Coetzee's work, indexing of secondary sources is also not complete.

  • Other formats: Also sound recording and large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg , 1986 .
      4552926417847989946.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 157p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      ISBN: 0436102986, 9780436102981
    • Johannesburg,
      c
      South Africa,
      c
      Southern Africa, Africa,
      :
      Ravan Press , 1986 .
      Extent: 157p.
      Edition info: 1st South African ed.
      ISBN: 0869753088, 9780869753088
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Penguin USA , 1987 .
      8234482400003409903.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 157p.
      ISBN: 014009623X, 9780140096231
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking Press , 1987 .
      2655808328046864886.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 167p.
      ISBN: 0670813982, 9780670813988
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1987 .
      3679734473815082297.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 157p.
      ISBN: 0140110321, 9780140110326
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books , 2010 .
      8434729912713798273.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 157p.
      ISBN: 0241950112, 9780241950111
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2010 .
      2562069256271348551.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 157p.
      ISBN: 0141399384, 9780141399386
Alternative title: Mr. Foe en Mrs. Barton
Language: Dutch
    • Houten,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Agathon , 1987 .
      7148216276394386462.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 158p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      Note/s:
      • Published as Foe.
      ISBN: 9026951183, 9789026951183
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cossee , 2003 .
      4608130833738179653.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 172p.
      Edition info: 2nd ed.
      ISBN: 9059360362, 9789059360365

Works about this Work

Dialogues of Memory, Heritage and Transformation : Re-membering Contested Identities and Spaces in Postcolonial South African and Zimbabwean White Writings Muchativugwa Hove , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , September vol. 32 no. 3 2016; (p. 59-76)
'The protean and contested symbols of Zimbabwean literature remain the land and invented heroes, including a hagiographic iconisation of shrines, best seen in the Zimbabwe ruins, the Zimbabwe Bird and the national heroes’ acre. In South African white writings, the symbolic topos has been dominated by prison walls, the hangman’s noose, Robben Island and, in the post-apartheid era, Saartjie Baartman and the imagined rainbow generated through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). The horrors of apartheid are ideographically embodied in Coetzee’s tongueless protagonist, Foe. In both locales, white writings – fictive renditions and auto/biographical – have invited critically legitimated constructs of coherence. This article contends that answers to our present postcolonial crises inhere in the multiplicity of voices, not monological narratives. Diversity, and therefore polyphony, is valued for its ability to suggest multiple ways of seeing and belonging to national imaginaries; its ability to suggest answers to the postcolonial problematic related to memory, heritage and transformation. This article explores how the meanings of cultural objects often display shifting appropriations that garner either symbolic or ephemeral qualities, demonstrating the ability of those in power at different historical junctures to determine and confer minted meanings. In turn, this anxiety and re-membering of space and symbol has a bearing on ownership claims, and gives rise to a choreographed heritage discourse.' (Publication abstract)
The Spiritual Liberation of Music, Dance, and Ritual : Verbal-versus Non-verbal Communication in J. M. Coetzee's 'Foe' Nigel H. Foxcroft , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth Essays and Studies , Autumn vol. 38 no. 1 2015; (p. 11-20)
' In exploring the power and diverse means of communication reflected in J. M. Coetzee's Foe (1986), this article considers the nature, musicality, and limitations of language - both written and oral. It investigates the sway of non-verbal communication, reflected through the spiritually liberating forms of story-making, music, dance, and ritual. Dexterity in Afro-American dances (Capoeira, Candombl , and Calypso) is contemplated with regard to Foe's Bahian setting and Friday's performing abilities.' (Publication abstract)
Teaching Coetzee’s Foe in an Undergraduate Theory Classroom Emily S. Davis , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 180-186)
Father to My Story : Writing Foe, De-authorizing (De)Foe Manuel Almagro Jiménez , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses , no. 18 2005; (p. 7-24)
'Foe is probably not J.M. Coetzee's best known novel, although it is a text of great importance because of the way in which its political, literary and theoretical values are interrelated. The novel addresses a foundational myth of Western societies in the figure of Robinson Crusoe, and draws attention to its textual quality. This concern with the process of representation and the narrative quality of our beliefs is also manifested throughout the novel in other issues. Thus, in the text there is a whole panoply of reflections about the central issues affecting the very mechanics of constructing a text, such as, for example, the proper way a story should be written, the relationship between representation and its referent in the real, the problem of realism, or the question of authorship.' (Publication abstract)
Teaching Coetzee’s Foe in an Undergraduate Theory Classroom Emily S. Davis , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 180-186)
Father to My Story : Writing Foe, De-authorizing (De)Foe Manuel Almagro Jiménez , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses , no. 18 2005; (p. 7-24)
'Foe is probably not J.M. Coetzee's best known novel, although it is a text of great importance because of the way in which its political, literary and theoretical values are interrelated. The novel addresses a foundational myth of Western societies in the figure of Robinson Crusoe, and draws attention to its textual quality. This concern with the process of representation and the narrative quality of our beliefs is also manifested throughout the novel in other issues. Thus, in the text there is a whole panoply of reflections about the central issues affecting the very mechanics of constructing a text, such as, for example, the proper way a story should be written, the relationship between representation and its referent in the real, the problem of realism, or the question of authorship.' (Publication abstract)
The Spiritual Liberation of Music, Dance, and Ritual : Verbal-versus Non-verbal Communication in J. M. Coetzee's 'Foe' Nigel H. Foxcroft , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth Essays and Studies , Autumn vol. 38 no. 1 2015; (p. 11-20)
' In exploring the power and diverse means of communication reflected in J. M. Coetzee's Foe (1986), this article considers the nature, musicality, and limitations of language - both written and oral. It investigates the sway of non-verbal communication, reflected through the spiritually liberating forms of story-making, music, dance, and ritual. Dexterity in Afro-American dances (Capoeira, Candombl , and Calypso) is contemplated with regard to Foe's Bahian setting and Friday's performing abilities.' (Publication abstract)
Dialogues of Memory, Heritage and Transformation : Re-membering Contested Identities and Spaces in Postcolonial South African and Zimbabwean White Writings Muchativugwa Hove , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , September vol. 32 no. 3 2016; (p. 59-76)
'The protean and contested symbols of Zimbabwean literature remain the land and invented heroes, including a hagiographic iconisation of shrines, best seen in the Zimbabwe ruins, the Zimbabwe Bird and the national heroes’ acre. In South African white writings, the symbolic topos has been dominated by prison walls, the hangman’s noose, Robben Island and, in the post-apartheid era, Saartjie Baartman and the imagined rainbow generated through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). The horrors of apartheid are ideographically embodied in Coetzee’s tongueless protagonist, Foe. In both locales, white writings – fictive renditions and auto/biographical – have invited critically legitimated constructs of coherence. This article contends that answers to our present postcolonial crises inhere in the multiplicity of voices, not monological narratives. Diversity, and therefore polyphony, is valued for its ability to suggest multiple ways of seeing and belonging to national imaginaries; its ability to suggest answers to the postcolonial problematic related to memory, heritage and transformation. This article explores how the meanings of cultural objects often display shifting appropriations that garner either symbolic or ephemeral qualities, demonstrating the ability of those in power at different historical junctures to determine and confer minted meanings. In turn, this anxiety and re-membering of space and symbol has a bearing on ownership claims, and gives rise to a choreographed heritage discourse.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 26 Oct 2016 07:48:20
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