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The Dinkum Australian single work   short story   war literature  
Issue Details: First known date: 1918... 1918 The Dinkum Australian
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Der waschechte Australier
Language: German

Works about this Work

Desert Worlds Richard Nile , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 84-105)
'In late 1914, twenty thousand mostly young Australian men ventured forth from the driest inhabited continent on earth to cross the ocean in a convoy spread over twenty-five kilometres in length and measuring twenty kilometres in width. The greatest mass exodus from the Antipodes which included a further ten thousand New Zealanders, this was the first and largest of many similar voyages over the next four years. The Australians might have considered themselves to be desert people. “The sand has his own / Wave and motion,” wrote S. Musgrove in “Australia Deserta” in the first issue of Southerly in 1939, “Rages the bed / Of the stony ocean” (14). Yet they preferred to identify as colonial sons returning to the motherland of pastoral England before heading to war. Of their own place, “They call her a young country but they lie,” wrote A. D. Hope in his much debated poem “Australia” which he began writing around the time of the publication of the inaugural issue—and to which he contributed an essay—“She is the last of lands, the emptiest, / ... the womb within is dry” (Hope).' 

 (Introduction)

Desert Worlds Richard Nile , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 84-105)
'In late 1914, twenty thousand mostly young Australian men ventured forth from the driest inhabited continent on earth to cross the ocean in a convoy spread over twenty-five kilometres in length and measuring twenty kilometres in width. The greatest mass exodus from the Antipodes which included a further ten thousand New Zealanders, this was the first and largest of many similar voyages over the next four years. The Australians might have considered themselves to be desert people. “The sand has his own / Wave and motion,” wrote S. Musgrove in “Australia Deserta” in the first issue of Southerly in 1939, “Rages the bed / Of the stony ocean” (14). Yet they preferred to identify as colonial sons returning to the motherland of pastoral England before heading to war. Of their own place, “They call her a young country but they lie,” wrote A. D. Hope in his much debated poem “Australia” which he began writing around the time of the publication of the inaugural issue—and to which he contributed an essay—“She is the last of lands, the emptiest, / ... the womb within is dry” (Hope).' 

 (Introduction)

Last amended 10 Sep 2013 16:27:48
Subjects:
  • c
    Egypt,
    c
    North Africa, Africa,
  • c
    France,
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
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