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Land Deal single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1978... 1978 Land Deal
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: 土地交易
Language: Chinese
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Foreign Literature and Art 外国文艺 / Wai Guo Wen Yi Shanghai : 山东文艺出版社 , 1978- 11595774 1978 periodical

    "Foreign Literature" is a purely literary publication that focuses on contemporary foreign literature. Published by the Shanghai Translation Publishing House, it has focused, systematic translation of contemporary foreign literature and art (literature, and art) works and theories, introduced representative schools, reflecting the new foreign literature trends and dynamics.

    Shanghai : 山东文艺出版社 , 1978-
    pg. 63-66
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Dreamworks : Strange New Stories David King (editor), Carlton : Norstrilia Press , 1983 Z521523 1983 anthology short story science fiction Anthology of speculative short stories by Australian authors thematically tied together by the concern with the nature of reality. Carlton : Norstrilia Press , 1983 pg. 151-156
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Velvet Waters Gerald Murnane , Ringwood : McPhee Gribble , 1990 Z55492 1990 selected work short story Ringwood : McPhee Gribble , 1990 pg. 55-60
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Australian Short Story : An Anthology from the 1890s to the 1980s Laurie Hergenhan (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1986 Z380969 1986 anthology short story (taught in 13 units) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1992 pg. 285-289
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Australian Short Story : An Anthology from the 1890s to the 1980s Laurie Hergenhan (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1986 Z380969 1986 anthology short story (taught in 13 units) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1994 pg. 279-283
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Australian Short Story : An Anthology from the 1890s to the 1980s Laurie Hergenhan (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1986 Z380969 1986 anthology short story (taught in 13 units) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2002 pg. 335-339
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Collected Short Fiction Stream System : The Collected Short Fiction of Gerald Murnane Gerald Murnane , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2018 13182651 2018 selected work poetry

    'This volume brings together Gerald Murnane’s shorter works of fiction, most of which have been out of print for the past twenty five years. They include such masterpieces as ‘When the Mice Failed to Arrive’, ‘Stream System’, ‘First Love’, ‘Emerald Blue’, and ‘The Interior of Gaaldine’, a story which holds the key to the long break in Murnane’s career, and points the way towards his later works, from Barley Patch to Border Districts. Much is made of Murnane’s distinctive and elaborate style as a writer, but there is no one to match him in his sensitive portraits of family members – parents, uncles and aunts, and particularly children – and in his probing of situations which contain anxiety and embarrassment, shame or delight.'

    Source: Publisher's blurb.

    Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2018
    pg. 45-49

Works about this Work

Spinoza / Space / Speed / Sublime : Problems of Philosophy and Politics in the Post-Colonial Fiction of Gerald Murnane Patrick West , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Post-Colonial Cultures and Societies , vol. 4 no. 1 2013; (p. 1-15)

'This article takes account of the ‘spontaneity’ of the post-colonial fiction of Gerald Murnane within the ‘dominating space’ of the philosophy of Spinoza. My use of Paul Carter’s terms here is strategic. The compact of fiction and philosophy in Murnane corresponds with the relationship of spontaneity to the dominating organization of desire in Carter’s rendering of an Aboriginal hunter. Carter’s phrase “‘a figure at once spontaneous and wholly dominated by the space of his desire’” worries Ken Gelder and Jane M. Jacobs, who suggest that it subjugates the formation of Aboriginal desire (incorporating spontaneity) to impulses of imperialism. The captivating immanence of Spinoza’s philosophy in Murnane’s fiction, which I will demonstrate with various examples, puts pressure on the fiction to occupy the same space as the space of the philosophy. Here is a clue to why Murnane’s post-colonial thematics have been little explored by critics with an interest in post-colonial politics. The desire of Spinoza’s philosophy creates a spatial textuality within which the spontaneity of Murnane’s fiction, to the degree that it maximizes or fills the philosophy, is minimized in its political effects. That is to say, the fiction shifts politics into an external space of what Roland Barthes calls “resistance or condemnation”. However, the different speeds (or timings) of Murnane and Spinoza, within the one space, mitigate this resistance of the outside, at least in respect of certain circumstances of post-coloniality. It is especially productive, I suggest, to engage Carter’s representation of an Aboriginal hunter through the compact of coincidental spaces and differential speeds created by Murnane’s fiction in Spinoza’s philosophy. This produces a ceaseless activation of desire and domination, evidenced in Murnane’s short story ‘Land Deal’, and indexed by a post-Romantic sublime. What limits the value of Murnane’s fiction in most contexts of post-colonial politics, is precisely what makes it useful in the matter of Carter’s Aboriginal hunter.' (Publication abstract)

May in September : Australian Literature as Anglophone Alternative Nicholas Birns , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Winter vol. 15 no. 2 2002; (p. 112-132) Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature 2002; (p. 112-132)
Nicholas Birns considers that attractions of Australian literary studies for overseas scholars. In the second part of his essay, Birns offers close readings of several of Gerald Murnane's short stories to argue that paying 'heed to Australian writing can vividly and unpredictably renovate 'English' as a discipline' (128).
May in September : Australian Literature as Anglophone Alternative Nicholas Birns , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Winter vol. 15 no. 2 2002; (p. 112-132) Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature 2002; (p. 112-132)
Nicholas Birns considers that attractions of Australian literary studies for overseas scholars. In the second part of his essay, Birns offers close readings of several of Gerald Murnane's short stories to argue that paying 'heed to Australian writing can vividly and unpredictably renovate 'English' as a discipline' (128).
Spinoza / Space / Speed / Sublime : Problems of Philosophy and Politics in the Post-Colonial Fiction of Gerald Murnane Patrick West , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Post-Colonial Cultures and Societies , vol. 4 no. 1 2013; (p. 1-15)

'This article takes account of the ‘spontaneity’ of the post-colonial fiction of Gerald Murnane within the ‘dominating space’ of the philosophy of Spinoza. My use of Paul Carter’s terms here is strategic. The compact of fiction and philosophy in Murnane corresponds with the relationship of spontaneity to the dominating organization of desire in Carter’s rendering of an Aboriginal hunter. Carter’s phrase “‘a figure at once spontaneous and wholly dominated by the space of his desire’” worries Ken Gelder and Jane M. Jacobs, who suggest that it subjugates the formation of Aboriginal desire (incorporating spontaneity) to impulses of imperialism. The captivating immanence of Spinoza’s philosophy in Murnane’s fiction, which I will demonstrate with various examples, puts pressure on the fiction to occupy the same space as the space of the philosophy. Here is a clue to why Murnane’s post-colonial thematics have been little explored by critics with an interest in post-colonial politics. The desire of Spinoza’s philosophy creates a spatial textuality within which the spontaneity of Murnane’s fiction, to the degree that it maximizes or fills the philosophy, is minimized in its political effects. That is to say, the fiction shifts politics into an external space of what Roland Barthes calls “resistance or condemnation”. However, the different speeds (or timings) of Murnane and Spinoza, within the one space, mitigate this resistance of the outside, at least in respect of certain circumstances of post-coloniality. It is especially productive, I suggest, to engage Carter’s representation of an Aboriginal hunter through the compact of coincidental spaces and differential speeds created by Murnane’s fiction in Spinoza’s philosophy. This produces a ceaseless activation of desire and domination, evidenced in Murnane’s short story ‘Land Deal’, and indexed by a post-Romantic sublime. What limits the value of Murnane’s fiction in most contexts of post-colonial politics, is precisely what makes it useful in the matter of Carter’s Aboriginal hunter.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 6 Sep 2018 06:30:04
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