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Stream System single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1990... 1990 Stream System
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Notes

  • Author's note: Stream System was written to be read aloud at a gathering in the Department of English at La Trobe University in 1988.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Velvet Waters Gerald Murnane , Ringwood : McPhee Gribble , 1990 Z55492 1990 selected work short story Ringwood : McPhee Gribble , 1990 pg. 31-54
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Invisible Yet Enduring Lilacs : Essays Gerald Murnane , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2005 Z1213211 2005 selected work autobiography essay criticism short story Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2005 pg. 117-147
    Note: At the conclusion of the short story the author states that he has used this piece of fiction to illustrate his creative writing process.
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Collected Short Fiction Stream System : The Collected Short Fiction of Gerald Murnane Gerald Murnane , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2018 13182651 2018 selected work poetry

    'This volume brings together Gerald Murnane’s shorter works of fiction, most of which have been out of print for the past twenty five years. They include such masterpieces as ‘When the Mice Failed to Arrive’, ‘Stream System’, ‘First Love’, ‘Emerald Blue’, and ‘The Interior of Gaaldine’, a story which holds the key to the long break in Murnane’s career, and points the way towards his later works, from Barley Patch to Border Districts. Much is made of Murnane’s distinctive and elaborate style as a writer, but there is no one to match him in his sensitive portraits of family members – parents, uncles and aunts, and particularly children – and in his probing of situations which contain anxiety and embarrassment, shame or delight.'

    Source: Publisher's blurb.

    Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2018

Works about this Work

Two New Books From Australia, Unconstrained by Literary Convention Benjamin H. Ogden , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 18 June 2018;

'Born in 1939, Gerald Murnane is an Australian author of 14 books of memoir and fiction, each of which is wonderfully unusual in that it takes as its focus the mental images Murnane sees while he writes, the scenery surrounding those images and the way one mental image will lead to another and then another. Murnane’s books, apart from his early novel “The Plains,” aren’t about anything in the way that most fiction is about events and action among characters whose motivations interest the reader. Rather, the few thousand pages that Murnane has produced since his 1975 debut, “Tamarisk Row,” are a record of what he has seen when he tried to look at the place that is his own mind, and the effort of a lifetime that it has been for him to explore the inner reaches of this place through writing about it.' (Introduction)

Gerald Murnane’s Endless Island Ryu Spaeth , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The New Republic , 4 May 2018;

'At the very moment of his breakthrough, Gerald Murnane is threatening to disappear. The 79-year-old Australian writer—long considered a contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature, an association that speaks both to his genius and obscurity—is enjoying a rare moment in the sun. As he told The New York Times Magazine in a recent profile, “My publishing history’s just so checkered with sudden reversals, ups and downs, confusions, wrong turnings, and at the end of my life, virtually, it seems like things are starting to work out.” He has a new home with a major U.S. publisher (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, after many years with various independent houses), which has released two volumes of work previously unavailable to a general American readership: Stream System, his collected short fiction, and Border Districts, a novel. Yet these books have the feeling of a farewell: The first is a career-spanning overview, while Murnane has said that the latter is his final work of fiction.' (Introduction)

Gerald Murnane’s Endless Island Ryu Spaeth , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The New Republic , 4 May 2018;

'At the very moment of his breakthrough, Gerald Murnane is threatening to disappear. The 79-year-old Australian writer—long considered a contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature, an association that speaks both to his genius and obscurity—is enjoying a rare moment in the sun. As he told The New York Times Magazine in a recent profile, “My publishing history’s just so checkered with sudden reversals, ups and downs, confusions, wrong turnings, and at the end of my life, virtually, it seems like things are starting to work out.” He has a new home with a major U.S. publisher (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, after many years with various independent houses), which has released two volumes of work previously unavailable to a general American readership: Stream System, his collected short fiction, and Border Districts, a novel. Yet these books have the feeling of a farewell: The first is a career-spanning overview, while Murnane has said that the latter is his final work of fiction.' (Introduction)

Two New Books From Australia, Unconstrained by Literary Convention Benjamin H. Ogden , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 18 June 2018;

'Born in 1939, Gerald Murnane is an Australian author of 14 books of memoir and fiction, each of which is wonderfully unusual in that it takes as its focus the mental images Murnane sees while he writes, the scenery surrounding those images and the way one mental image will lead to another and then another. Murnane’s books, apart from his early novel “The Plains,” aren’t about anything in the way that most fiction is about events and action among characters whose motivations interest the reader. Rather, the few thousand pages that Murnane has produced since his 1975 debut, “Tamarisk Row,” are a record of what he has seen when he tried to look at the place that is his own mind, and the effort of a lifetime that it has been for him to explore the inner reaches of this place through writing about it.' (Introduction)

Last amended 17 May 2018 11:06:09
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