AustLit logo
Desert Dawn single work   poetry   "IT is a ghost that walks before birth."
Issue Details: First known date: 1944-1940... 1944-1940 Desert Dawn
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Selected Poems Rex Ingamells , Melbourne : Georgian House , 1944 Z131810 1944 selected work poetry Melbourne : Georgian House , 1944 pg. 22
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Jindyworobaks Brian Elliott (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1979 Z354916 1979 anthology poetry criticism extract St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1979 pg. 19

Works about this Work

Utopia and Ideology in the Vision of the Jindyworobaks Daniel Hempel , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 2 2016; (p. 4-14)
'This article discusses the vision behind the Jindyworobak movement in terms of its complex interplay between progressive utopianism and ideological regression. The Jindyworobaks, an Australian literary movement of the twentieth century, sought a deeper connection with the Australian environment based on appreciation and a willingness to learn from its indigenous traditions. At the same time, however, their writings still deny the Aboriginal subaltern a voice, and effectively perpetuate the power structures the Jindyworobaks seemingly oppose. This intriguing interplay forms the basis of this article, which draws on a conceptual framework inspired by Paul Ricœur, Ernst Bloch and Slavoj Zizek to map out the interactions between utopia and ideology in the vision of the Jindyworobaks.' (Publication abstract)
Utopia and Ideology in the Vision of the Jindyworobaks Daniel Hempel , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 7 no. 2 2016; (p. 4-14)
'This article discusses the vision behind the Jindyworobak movement in terms of its complex interplay between progressive utopianism and ideological regression. The Jindyworobaks, an Australian literary movement of the twentieth century, sought a deeper connection with the Australian environment based on appreciation and a willingness to learn from its indigenous traditions. At the same time, however, their writings still deny the Aboriginal subaltern a voice, and effectively perpetuate the power structures the Jindyworobaks seemingly oppose. This intriguing interplay forms the basis of this article, which draws on a conceptual framework inspired by Paul Ricœur, Ernst Bloch and Slavoj Zizek to map out the interactions between utopia and ideology in the vision of the Jindyworobaks.' (Publication abstract)
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X