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Issue Details: First known date: 1988... 1988 Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Cambridge, Cambridgeshire,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Cambridge University Press , 1988 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Henry Lawson as Founding Father, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism (p. 34-38)
Lawson and Divergent Approaches to the Code of Nationalism, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism (p. 41-45)
Palmer and Ward on the Gold Rush, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism (p. 95-98)
Henry Handel Richardson and the Critics, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism (p. 103-106)
Henry Lawson : The People's Poet, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism
Schaffer considers the place of women in Lawson's fiction in relation to the many constructions of an authorial identity that supports various critical perspectives. Schaffer demonstrates that women are a signifier of lack within the discourse on the Australian tradition that uses Lawson as an example. This discourse, Schaffer argues, establishes a bond between the writer and his audience that stabilizes and solidifies the construction of a masculine national identity.
(p. 112-147)
Barbara Baynton : A Dissident Voice from the Bush, Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism (p. 148-170)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
Building on Gendered Ground: Space and National Identity in Brenda Walker’s The Wing of Night Laura White , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 4-13)

'On Anzac Day 2005 John Howard proclaimed that Anzac soldiers had 'bequeathed Australia a lasting sense of national identity'. Howard's speeches and other efforts to revitalise Anzac Day have generated questions about his vision of the Australian nation...

Brenda Walker's award winning fourth novel The Wing of Night entered this debate about the control and uses of the Anzac image in 2005, the year that marked the 90th anniversary of the Anzac landing at Gallipoli. By honouring and remembering a variety of men and women that Howard's version of the Anzac legend ignores, Walker challenges a limited, gendered image of the nation.' (p. 1)
The Australian Women's Story as a Success? Feminist Knowledges and Literary Production in the Eighties Eleanor Hogan , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antithesis , vol. 7 no. 1 1995; (p. 31-45)
Untitled Jill Golden , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Refractory Girl , January no. 34 1990; (p. 38-39)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Reviews Lucy Frost , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , April vol. 24 no. 94 1990; (p. 150-151)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Jill Golden , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Refractory Girl , January no. 34 1990; (p. 38-39)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Old Mother Earth Cops an Earful Robyn Walton , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24 December 1988; (p. 34)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Deconstructing a Few Cherished Myths Stephanie Green , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 March 1989; (p. B5)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism ; The Women Were There : Nineteen Women Who Enlivened Australia's History Nance Donkin , 1988 single work biography
Masculine Myths Have Been Around Since the Time of Lawson Carol Treloar , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 11 February 1989; (p. 10)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Reading Against the Grain Helen Thomson , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 108 1989; (p. 4-6)

— Review of Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition Kay Schaffer , 1988 multi chapter work criticism
Building on Gendered Ground: Space and National Identity in Brenda Walker’s The Wing of Night Laura White , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 4-13)

'On Anzac Day 2005 John Howard proclaimed that Anzac soldiers had 'bequeathed Australia a lasting sense of national identity'. Howard's speeches and other efforts to revitalise Anzac Day have generated questions about his vision of the Australian nation...

Brenda Walker's award winning fourth novel The Wing of Night entered this debate about the control and uses of the Anzac image in 2005, the year that marked the 90th anniversary of the Anzac landing at Gallipoli. By honouring and remembering a variety of men and women that Howard's version of the Anzac legend ignores, Walker challenges a limited, gendered image of the nation.' (p. 1)
Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
The Australian Women's Story as a Success? Feminist Knowledges and Literary Production in the Eighties Eleanor Hogan , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antithesis , vol. 7 no. 1 1995; (p. 31-45)
Last amended 22 Feb 2010 12:41:33
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