AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 4615098307885604441.png
Image sourced from the University of Sydney, Fisher Library
y separately published work icon The Missing Angel single work   novel   satire  
Issue Details: First known date: 1947... 1947 The Missing Angel
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'For the leading characters of his new book, "The Missing Angel," Erle Cox has chosen a young and personable young business man (very wealthy and very pure); a man-about-town (wicked); a nagging wife (disagreeable); a private secretary (beautiful), and the Devil himself. Then he provided himself with a big spoon and mixed them all up, giving us a farce which is at times extremely humorous, though always quite improbable. If you can look upon it from the point of view of rather robust humour you will probably enjoy the book.

'Tydvil Jones was brought up very carefully, almost, one might say, in seclusion, and when he inherited his father's flourishing business he found himself at a decided disadvantage. It was only then that he discovered that his wife was not like other women. She nagged and persecuted him, lied, and generally controlled him. And eventually he woke up, and decided to put a stop to it.

'In his scheme Tydvil Jones was associated and helped in every way by the gentleman who was known as Nicholas Senior. Through his guidance Tydvil was able to change personalities with Billy Brewer, a young man who believed in living life to the fullest degree possible. The resulting chaos may well be imagined, but for three months Tydvil had more fun and did more disreputable things than he would at one time have thought possible in a whole lifetime of sin.

As may be imagined this change of personalities led to some hilarity and more strife, with the police department frequently chasing the wrong man. It all ends happily in the end.'

Source:

'Amusing Farce by an Australian Writer', Western Mail, 30 January 1947, p.24.

Notes

  • Epigraph: My Lords / There was an island of farewell, / Whence parted those things real / From those that only seemed to be.'
  • Dedication: To MOLL, KATH and HAROLD

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Other Formats

Works about this Work

Reality and Fantasy Thelma Herring , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 9 no. 4 1948; (p. 243-244)

— Review of The Missing Angel Erle Cox , 1947 single work novel ; High River Nourma Handford , 1947 single work novel
Untitled N.B. , 1947 single work review
— Appears in: Twentieth Century , vol. 2 no. 2 1947; (p. 137-138)

— Review of The Missing Angel Erle Cox , 1947 single work novel
Untitled N.B. , 1947 single work review
— Appears in: Twentieth Century , vol. 2 no. 2 1947; (p. 137-138)

— Review of The Missing Angel Erle Cox , 1947 single work novel
Reality and Fantasy Thelma Herring , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 9 no. 4 1948; (p. 243-244)

— Review of The Missing Angel Erle Cox , 1947 single work novel ; High River Nourma Handford , 1947 single work novel
Last amended 7 Apr 2016 13:59:43
Settings:
  • Melbourne, Victoria,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X