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Issue Details: First known date: 1980... 1980 Palomino
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Collingwood, Fitzroy - Collingwood area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Outback Press , 1980 .
      Extent: 260p.
      ISBN: 0868882615
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Persea Books ,
      1987 .
      Extent: 260p.
      Note/s:
      • 'Stanley Moss book.'
      ISBN: 089255116X, 0892551364 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin ,
      1989 .
      Extent: 260p.
      ISBN: 0140114726 (pbk)
Alternative title: Eine Frau und eine Frau
Language: German
    • Munich,
      c
      Germany,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Goldmann ,
      1990 .
      Extent: 285p.
      ISBN: 3442097819

Works about this Work

Inaugural Elizabeth Jolley Conference : Reading and Writing Romance in the 21st Century: Opening Address Caroline Lurie , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , September vol. 3 no. 3 2014; (p. 375-378)
Elizabeth Jolley : A Cross-Cultural Life in Writing Barbara Milech , Brian Dibble , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;

'Elizabeth Jolley is one of Australia's most significant writers: she published some two dozen books of fiction, essays and radio dramas, won every major Australian literary award, received four honorary doctorates, was awarded the Order of Australia for service to Australian Literature in 1988, and was named an Australian 'National Living Treasure' in 1997.

Her career has its roots in the UK, the place of her birth, schooling and early marriage. In 1959 she travelled with her three children and her husband to Perth, Western Australia, where Leonard Jolley took up a position as foundation Librarian of the University of Western Australia. She brought with her a trunk full of unpublished/rejected manuscripts which provided the initial materials from which she developed her published fictions and essays in Australia.

This article explores the institutional frameworks in Australia which enabled Jolley - a constant writer from childhood - to develop, in David Carter's phrase, 'a career in writing' from the mid-1970s onwards. It argues that Jolley rewrote her foundation manuscripts (written in another country) both to imagine Australian lives and to conform to Australian publishers' requirements. In doing so, it traces how the fiction and essays translate the experience of migration/exile, often thematised through the recurrent image of being 'on the edge,' into the particular and powerful ethic of love that informs Jolley's writing.' (Author's abstract)

Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
Friendship in a Time of Loneliness Barbara Milech , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 97-110)
The essay 'explores the ways in which Jolley's fictions are simultaneously motivated by a longing for consummate love - (hetero)sexual, intellectual, spiritual, all at once - and shaped by a gathering understanding of the impossibility of that desire as a way of being in the world' (98-99).
Author Tribute Teresa , 2007 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Lesbians on the Loose , April vol. 18 no. 4 2007; (p. 7)
[Review] Miss Peabody's Inheritance [et al] J. Motion , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 18 October 1985; (p. 1173)

— Review of Miss Peabody's Inheritance Elizabeth Jolley , 1983 single work novel ; Milk and Honey : A Novel Elizabeth Jolley , 1984 single work novel ; Loving Daughters Olga Masters , 1984 single work novel ; Annie Magdalene Barbara Hanrahan , 1985 single work novel ; Bearded Ladies : Stories Kate Grenville , 1984 selected work short story poetry ; Palomino Elizabeth Jolley , 1980 single work novel ; Mr Scobie's Riddle Elizabeth Jolley , 1983 single work novel
Female Companions Nancy Keesing , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 28 1981; (p. 34-35)

— Review of Palomino Elizabeth Jolley , 1980 single work novel
A Melancholy Novel, Darkly Disturbing Laurie Clancy , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 3 November 1984; (p. 19)

— Review of Palomino Elizabeth Jolley , 1980 single work novel ; Milk and Honey : A Novel Elizabeth Jolley , 1984 single work novel
Awaiting the Next Sick Surprise Katharine England , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 13 October 1984; (p. 38)

— Review of Palomino Elizabeth Jolley , 1980 single work novel ; Milk and Honey : A Novel Elizabeth Jolley , 1984 single work novel
The Grotesque and the Innocent Lucy Frost , 1984 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , December no. 97 1984; (p. 66-68)

— Review of Palomino Elizabeth Jolley , 1980 single work novel ; Milk and Honey : A Novel Elizabeth Jolley , 1984 single work novel ; The Bush Soldiers John Hooker , 1984 single work novel ; Bearded Ladies : Stories Kate Grenville , 1984 selected work short story poetry
Author Tribute Teresa , 2007 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Lesbians on the Loose , April vol. 18 no. 4 2007; (p. 7)
Friendship in a Time of Loneliness Barbara Milech , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 97-110)
The essay 'explores the ways in which Jolley's fictions are simultaneously motivated by a longing for consummate love - (hetero)sexual, intellectual, spiritual, all at once - and shaped by a gathering understanding of the impossibility of that desire as a way of being in the world' (98-99).
Elizabeth Jolley : An Appreciation Helen Garner , 1989 extract criticism (Elizabeth Jolley : An Appreciation)(A Strange Novel That Rubs the Right Way)
— Appears in: Eight Voices of the Eighties : Stories, Journalism and Criticism by Australian Women Writers 1989; (p. 383-387)
Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
Elizabeth Jolley : A Cross-Cultural Life in Writing Barbara Milech , Brian Dibble , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;

'Elizabeth Jolley is one of Australia's most significant writers: she published some two dozen books of fiction, essays and radio dramas, won every major Australian literary award, received four honorary doctorates, was awarded the Order of Australia for service to Australian Literature in 1988, and was named an Australian 'National Living Treasure' in 1997.

Her career has its roots in the UK, the place of her birth, schooling and early marriage. In 1959 she travelled with her three children and her husband to Perth, Western Australia, where Leonard Jolley took up a position as foundation Librarian of the University of Western Australia. She brought with her a trunk full of unpublished/rejected manuscripts which provided the initial materials from which she developed her published fictions and essays in Australia.

This article explores the institutional frameworks in Australia which enabled Jolley - a constant writer from childhood - to develop, in David Carter's phrase, 'a career in writing' from the mid-1970s onwards. It argues that Jolley rewrote her foundation manuscripts (written in another country) both to imagine Australian lives and to conform to Australian publishers' requirements. In doing so, it traces how the fiction and essays translate the experience of migration/exile, often thematised through the recurrent image of being 'on the edge,' into the particular and powerful ethic of love that informs Jolley's writing.' (Author's abstract)

Last amended 24 Mar 2005 11:50:55
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