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Issue Details: First known date: 1961... 1961 A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1961 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Appreciation of Brennan, H. M. Green , single work (p. 461-483)
The Novel: Novels of the Countryside: Furphy, H. M. Green , single work criticism (p. 609-633)
The Intellectuals, H. M. Green , single work (p. 856-868)
General Comments on Judith Wright's Verse, H. M. Green , single work (p. 936-943)
The Novel : Novels of Purpose, H. M. Green , single work criticism (p. 1122-1152)
The Bush Ballad, H. M. Green , single work criticism
* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1984-1985 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Untitled, H. M. Green , single work criticism (p. 1040-41)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Australian Literature a Perspective of the Ecology of Literature Diao Keli , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies – Proceedings of the 14th International Conference of Australian Studies in China 2015; (p. 79-85)
'As a definition, the ecology of the literature is a study of the making and being of literature, it refers to not only the outside environment of literature, including the social, cultural and historical context, but also the constituent elements of literature, such as the writer, the text, the translator and the reader. It emphasizes the interplay of these elements that make literature come into being, as well as the developing rules of literature itself. Australian literature serves well as a case study of the ecology of literature. The making of Australian literature is the construction of constant opening and expansive nationalism. The making of the Australian writer is a process of tracing a tie with the past, establish an identity, and utter a voice of his own, and find a location in a new territory and world.' (79)
Dick the Poet : 'Allegorical Tendencies' in Robbery under Arms James Dahlstrom , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 41-45)
'Rolf Boldrewood's novel Robbery Under Arms is known for its action, adventure and frank depiction of life in Australia during the gold rush. It is also known for its didacticism, which critics tend to find disagreeable (Green 257; Rosenberg 488; Dowsley 75; Turner 240). Despite this recognition, the scholarship that explores the novel's didactic nature is limited to religious scholars like Veronica Brady, who suggests that Dick's narrative represents a surrender to cultural norms rather than an allegory symbolizing a genuine spiritual transformation (41). This paper, however, seeks to create a new discussion that will draw out the Christian-centered 'allegorical tendencies' in Robbery Under Arms.' (Author's introduction)
America, the Forbidden Fruit : Anti-American Sentiment in Robbery under Arms James Dahlstrom , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 25 no. 2 2011; (p. 145-150)
James Dahlstrom looks for anti-American sentiment in Rolf Bolderwood's novel, Robbery under Arm. This is achieved by examining the novel 'in its historical context and by placing the author in this historical context and by treating the novel as colonial narrative.' (p. 145)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
'It Was to Have Been my Best Book' : Dorothy Green and E. L. Grant Watson Suzanne Falkiner , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;
'When literary critic Dorothy Green died in 1991, those in her immediate circle were mystified to learn that little trace of the biography of English writer E. L. Grant Watson, which she was known to have been researching for some twenty years, had been found among her papers. This article examines the reasons why.' (Author's abstract)
Anti-Nationalist Literary History : A Review of H. M. Green's History of Australian Literature Norman Freehill , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: The Realist , Spring no. 16 1964; (p. 15-17)

— Review of A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961 single work criticism
Green's History of Australian Literature Cecil Hadgraft , 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , December vol. 20 no. 4 1961; (p. 441-444)

— Review of A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961 single work criticism
A Symposium of Views on the H.M. Green History of Australian Literature 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February vol. 1 no. 4 1962; (p. 48-49)

— Review of A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961 single work criticism
Australian Literature Russel Ward , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 24 1962; (p. 49-51)

— Review of A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961 single work criticism
One Man in His Time Leonie Kramer , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Nation , 10 March 1962; (p. 22-23)

— Review of A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961 single work criticism
Assimilation, Unspeakable Traces and the Ontologies of Nation Joseph Pugliese , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meridian , October vol. 14 no. 2 1995; (p. 229-254)
'It Was to Have Been my Best Book' : Dorothy Green and E. L. Grant Watson Suzanne Falkiner , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;
'When literary critic Dorothy Green died in 1991, those in her immediate circle were mystified to learn that little trace of the biography of English writer E. L. Grant Watson, which she was known to have been researching for some twenty years, had been found among her papers. This article examines the reasons why.' (Author's abstract)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
America, the Forbidden Fruit : Anti-American Sentiment in Robbery under Arms James Dahlstrom , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 25 no. 2 2011; (p. 145-150)
James Dahlstrom looks for anti-American sentiment in Rolf Bolderwood's novel, Robbery under Arm. This is achieved by examining the novel 'in its historical context and by placing the author in this historical context and by treating the novel as colonial narrative.' (p. 145)
Dick the Poet : 'Allegorical Tendencies' in Robbery under Arms James Dahlstrom , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 41-45)
'Rolf Boldrewood's novel Robbery Under Arms is known for its action, adventure and frank depiction of life in Australia during the gold rush. It is also known for its didacticism, which critics tend to find disagreeable (Green 257; Rosenberg 488; Dowsley 75; Turner 240). Despite this recognition, the scholarship that explores the novel's didactic nature is limited to religious scholars like Veronica Brady, who suggests that Dick's narrative represents a surrender to cultural norms rather than an allegory symbolizing a genuine spiritual transformation (41). This paper, however, seeks to create a new discussion that will draw out the Christian-centered 'allegorical tendencies' in Robbery Under Arms.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 18 Jul 2002 17:04:49
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