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Courtesy of Magabala Books
y separately published work icon Dingo's Tree single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Dingo's Tree
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Dingo's Tree is a tale of friendship and sharing, it tells of the struggle to survive in a land that is devastated by mining. It is a powerful children's cautionary tale on the destruction and havoc that mining causes to land and to community. (Source Magabala Books website)

Exhibitions

8704064
9517690
7627332
10850653
7833548

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Notes

  • Dingo's Tree was first published as a short story in the Westerly, Volume 54, Number 2, 2009.
  • The book consists of four chapters:

    • Dingo's Tree
    • The Raindrop
    • The Tree that Walked
    • The Last Tree

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2011 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Magabala Books
      Extent: 48p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      ISBN: 1921248432 pbk., 9781921248436 pbk.

Works about this Work

BlackWords : Children's Literature About Country Anita Heiss , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 6)

In this essay Heiss addresses the increasing number of Aboriginal authored children's and young adult literature published that focuses on the 'meaning of place' in an Indigenous context. She demonstrates this by selecting writings and stories from regions such as remote, semi-remote and desert to tropics, which showcase the diversity of life in different parts of Indigenous Australia and the essence of Aboriginal storytelling.

[Review] Dingo’s Tree Patricia Halsall , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking about Books for Children , May vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 35)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
For Kids Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 14 - 15 April 2012; (p. 22)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
Very Special Tree 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 4 April no. 523 2012; (p. 54)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
[Review] Dingo’s Tree Liz Derouet , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 56 no. 2 2012; (p. 22-23)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
Very Special Tree 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 4 April no. 523 2012; (p. 54)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
For Kids Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 14 - 15 April 2012; (p. 22)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
[Review] Dingo’s Tree Patricia Halsall , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking about Books for Children , May vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 35)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
[Review] Dingo’s Tree Liz Derouet , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 56 no. 2 2012; (p. 22-23)

— Review of Dingo's Tree Gladys Milroy , 2011 single work picture book
BlackWords : Children's Literature About Country Anita Heiss , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 6)

In this essay Heiss addresses the increasing number of Aboriginal authored children's and young adult literature published that focuses on the 'meaning of place' in an Indigenous context. She demonstrates this by selecting writings and stories from regions such as remote, semi-remote and desert to tropics, which showcase the diversity of life in different parts of Indigenous Australia and the essence of Aboriginal storytelling.

Growing Up the Future : Children's Stories and Aboriginal Ecology Blaze Kwaymullina , Brooke Collins-Gearing , Ambelin Kwaymullina , Tracie Pushman , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: M/C Journal , vol. 15 no. 3 2012;

'In the context of children’s literature and ecology the idea of sustaining environmental and cultural awareness is shared via the written word—how it is used, presented, and read, particularly with ideas of the child reader in mind.  Our children will be the ones who struggle with the ripples we leave in our wake and they will be the ones who count the cost of our decisions as they in turn make decisions for the generations that will follow them. If we teach the right values then the behaviour of our children will reflect those ideas. In the Aboriginal way it’s about getting the story right, so that they can learn the right ways to be in Country, to be a human being, and to look after the world they inherit. As Deborah Bird Rose states, Country is a “nourishing terrain; a place that gives and receives life” (Rose Country 7).

This paper will examine two Aboriginal children’s stories that teach about a living, holistic, interrelated world and the responsibilities of human beings to look after it. Specifically, the authors will examine Joshua and the Two Crabs by Joshua Button and Dingo’s Tree by Gladys and Jill Milroy. Both stories are published by Aboriginal publisher Magabala Books and represent a genre of Aboriginal writing about Country and how to take care of it. They form part of the “language of that different yield” (Hogan 122) that Indigenous writer Linda Hogan advocates, a language that emerges from an ecology of the mind that locates human beings as an interconnected part of the patterns of the earth.  The first text discussion focuses on the sharing of implicit meaning via textual form—that is, the lay out of the story, its peritext, and illustrations. The second textual discussion centres explicitly on content and meaning. Both textual analyses aim to open up a dialogue between Aboriginal ecology and children’s literature to provide inter-subjective approaches for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal readers/listeners.'

Source: Introduction.

Last amended 7 Nov 2017 11:38:42
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