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form y separately published work icon Walk The Talk single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000 Walk The Talk
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Set on the Gold Coast, WALK THE TALK follows the story of Joey Grasso, a highly motivated and powerfully self-deluded young talent agent on his quest to resurrect the career of a faded club singer.'

Source: Screen Australia.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Crime Capital of Australia : The Gold Coast on Screen Stephen Stockwell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 5 no. 3 2012; (p. 281-292)
'The Gold Coast has a crime problem, which will not come as a surprise to the viewers of the films and television programmes that feature Australia's sixth largest city. The vast majority of material set on the Gold Coast has criminal themes. The Gold Coast is an imagined city created, to a large degree, by a multiplicity of moving image artefacts produced by visitors. From the miles of amateur footage shot by tourists to pseudo-Hollywood blockbusters, the Gold Coast exists as a surf and sun paradise, at least in the minds of audiences around the world. However, analysis of a variety of moving image products suggests that not far behind the glitz and glamour of the beach-based boosterism is the grimy flip side of crime, corruption and desperation. This imagined paradise is encircled by sharks, both from the sea and the land. But the crime themes explored so far by the Gold Coast film industry do not address the real transgressions on which the city is founded, neither the deals that saw a city built on sand and swamp nor the dispossession of the original inhabitants.' (Editor's abstract)
Walk The Talk Jake Wilson , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'Shirley Barrett's first film, Love Serenade (1995), featured one of the most memorable characters in recent Australian cinema: the burnt-out radio announcer Ken Sherry (George Shuksov), a long-nosed, grizzled '70s throwback with a taste for Barry White songs and a hilariously sleazy line in seductive patter. About halfway through the film, the two sisters competing for Ken's affections (played by Rebecca Frith and Miranda Otto) make an extraordinary discovery: on either side of Ken's ears are strange openings that resemble gills. Ken Sherry, in other words, is not just a fishy character. In some mysterious but literal sense, Ken is a fish.' (Author's introduction)
Star Turn Phil Brown , 2000 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 19 - 25 July no. 310 2000; (p. 24-25)
Walk The Talk Jake Wilson , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April-May no. 13 2001;
'Shirley Barrett's first film, Love Serenade (1995), featured one of the most memorable characters in recent Australian cinema: the burnt-out radio announcer Ken Sherry (George Shuksov), a long-nosed, grizzled '70s throwback with a taste for Barry White songs and a hilariously sleazy line in seductive patter. About halfway through the film, the two sisters competing for Ken's affections (played by Rebecca Frith and Miranda Otto) make an extraordinary discovery: on either side of Ken's ears are strange openings that resemble gills. Ken Sherry, in other words, is not just a fishy character. In some mysterious but literal sense, Ken is a fish.' (Author's introduction)
Star Turn Phil Brown , 2000 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane News , 19 - 25 July no. 310 2000; (p. 24-25)
Crime Capital of Australia : The Gold Coast on Screen Stephen Stockwell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 5 no. 3 2012; (p. 281-292)
'The Gold Coast has a crime problem, which will not come as a surprise to the viewers of the films and television programmes that feature Australia's sixth largest city. The vast majority of material set on the Gold Coast has criminal themes. The Gold Coast is an imagined city created, to a large degree, by a multiplicity of moving image artefacts produced by visitors. From the miles of amateur footage shot by tourists to pseudo-Hollywood blockbusters, the Gold Coast exists as a surf and sun paradise, at least in the minds of audiences around the world. However, analysis of a variety of moving image products suggests that not far behind the glitz and glamour of the beach-based boosterism is the grimy flip side of crime, corruption and desperation. This imagined paradise is encircled by sharks, both from the sea and the land. But the crime themes explored so far by the Gold Coast film industry do not address the real transgressions on which the city is founded, neither the deals that saw a city built on sand and swamp nor the dispossession of the original inhabitants.' (Editor's abstract)
Last amended 17 Oct 2012 13:03:32
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