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Alternative title: Modern Mobilities : Australian-Transnational Writing
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... vol. 71 no. 1 2011 of Southerly est. 1939 Southerly
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Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2011 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Trawling in the Arctici"Sometimes we trawled with the midnight sun", Ross Donlon , single work poetry (p. 10)
The Country of Boats, Jessica White , single work short story (p. 11-17)
Australian Transnation, Bill Ashcroft , single work criticism
'The world is more mobile than it has ever been and in many different fields, most notably literary studies, it has led to a growing, and now well established interest in cultural and ethnic mobility, diaspora, transnational and cosmopolitan interactions. This rise in global mobility at the same time as state borders have become more hysterically protected, has interested post-colonial cultural critics for some time. The concept of the nation, or at least the nation state, has often been robustly critiqued because the post-colonial nation is marked by disappointment, instituted on the boundaries of the colonial state and doomed to continue its oppressive functions. Almost universally the nation is contrasted with "the transnational" and the global movement of peoples. It is held to be a fixed entity, a pole of attraction or repulsion orienting transnational relationships at state level. But if we distinguish the nation from the state we discover that mobility and border crossing are already features of the phenomenon we call nation.' (Author's introduction)
(p. 18-40)
Absurdityi"I’m not sure if=我忘记是不是", Shu Cai , Yu Ouyang (translator), single work poetry (p. 41-43)
A Transnational Apprenticeship for Poets : Some Notes from Bundanon and Macao, Christopher Kelen , single work criticism (p. 44-75)
Pekingi"What's this search", A. S. Patrić , single work poetry (p. 76-77)
Caught Outside, Jonathan Bennett , single work essay (p. 78-86)
Geography Lessons : Victor Louey's World Touri"Please turn to your atlases to pp. 21-22", A. Frances Johnson , single work poetry (p. 87-88)
Reconciling with Oneself : Gordon Matthew's An Australian Son, Maggie Nolan , single work criticism (p. 89-104)
When London Callsi"They leave us - artists, singers, all-", Victor J. Daley , single work poetry satire (p. 105-106)
"When London Calls" and Fleet Street Beckons : Daley's Poem, Reg's Diary - What Happens When It All Goes "Bung"?, Meg Tasker , single work criticism
'A recurrent concern in late nineteenth - and early twentieth-century accounts of Australians in London is how "well" writers were doing. The common conception of the trip "Home" to Britain as a quest for cultural and professional success or recognition is reflected in the title of Angela Woollacott's feminist history, To Try Her Fortune in London, and it motivated many Australian writers, even a nationalist republican such as Henry Lawson, to regard London as the centre of literary culture, the best place in which to exercise their talents and ambitions. The emergence in these decades of a generation of "native-born" white Australian travellers who were related to but self-consciously different from the parent stock both in the colonies and in Britain created an anxious interest which fuelled ongoing discussions in newspapers and periodicals, prompted the creation of Anglo-Australian networks, clubs and publications in London, and supported many a columnist or special correspondent reporting back to Australia on the doings of their contemporaries in the great metropolis.' (Author's introduction, p. 107)
(p. 107-126)
A "Close-Cropped Scribess" : Agnes Murphy as Gossip Columnist, New Woman (Lesbian?) Novelist, Opera Entrepreneur and Militant Suffragette, Lucy Sussex , single work criticism

'At the turn of the last century, Australian literary and artistic hopefuls looked to London to further their careers, make good in the centre of the British Empire. Did they not have the example of Melba, the girl from the colonies who had become a diva, the most famous Australian in the world? A whole host of talents took the steamships north, actors, journalists, singers and famously Henry Lawson, for whom the trip proved a personal and artistic disaster.' (Author's introduction, p. 127)

(p. 127-142)
We are Not Alonei"I type "Roswell" into the Google window", John Carey , single work poetry (p. 150)
Merchantsi"when she arrived in the City with Exeter", Danielle Shelley Carr , single work poetry (p. 151)
This Swirling Saffron Mystery, Danielle Shelley Carr , sequence poetry (p. 151-153)
Diplomacyi"she swaps secrets with the Australian soldier", Danielle Shelley Carr , single work poetry (p. 152-153)
The Generation of the Photograph, or, Those Left Behind, George Kouvaros , single work autobiography (p. 154-165)
The Projectionisti""Cinemascope" is coming soon...", Geoff Page , single work poetry (p. 166-168)
Rise and Shine, Pavle Radonic , single work short story (p. 169-178)
The Siegei"Yellow is the complexion of Spring - the celandine", Michelle Cahill , single work poetry (p. 179)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

On Southerly and Australian Transnational Writing Mark William Jackson , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , January 2012;

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue
Southerly Sue Bond , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Programs , October vol. 15 no. 2 2011;

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue
In Short: Fiction Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 November 2011; (p. 34)

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue ; The Rattler and Other Stories A. S. Patrić , 2011 selected work novella short story
In Short: Fiction Kerryn Goldsworthy , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 November 2011; (p. 34)

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue ; The Rattler and Other Stories A. S. Patrić , 2011 selected work novella short story
Southerly Sue Bond , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Programs , October vol. 15 no. 2 2011;

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue
On Southerly and Australian Transnational Writing Mark William Jackson , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , January 2012;

— Review of Southerly vol. 71 no. 1 2011 periodical issue
Last amended 19 Jun 2013 09:01:11
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