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Source: www.moviemem.com
form y separately published work icon It Isn't Done single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 1937... 1937 It Isn't Done
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'An English solicitor, Mr Potter, arrives at the Blaydon farm at Stony Creek, near Sydney. He tells Hubert Blaydon that he's the long-lost heir to an English estate. Now known as Lord Blaydon, Hubert sails for England with his wife and 22-year-old daughter Pat. The two women take easily to life on the estate, but Hubert finds the new rules and social snobbery a trial, especially when his family is snubbed by the neighbour, Lord Denvee. Pat falls in love with her cousin, Peter Ashton, but he promises her father not to propose until his prospects improve.

For the inheritance to become legal, Hubert sends for a photograph of his mother, to prove his identity. Knowing that Peter Ashton is next in the line of inheritance, he doctors the photo's signature, to disqualify his own claim. Peter inherits and marries Pat, which allows Hubert and his wife to sail back to Australia - where they want to be, anyway. The butler Jarms sails with them, rather than staying on in class-ridden England. Besides, he knows that Hubert is the real Lord Blaydon - inheritance or not.' (Source: Australian Screen website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Polysemous Coathanger : The Sydney Harbour Bridge in Feature Film, 1930-1982 Lennart Jacobsen , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , July - September no. 40 2006;
'The cinema has long been attracted to photographing great cultural icons. This article provides a thorough account of the celluloid life of one of Australia's most distinctive landmarks.' (Publisher's abstract)
The Polysemous Coathanger : The Sydney Harbour Bridge in Feature Film, 1930-1982 Lennart Jacobsen , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , July - September no. 40 2006;
'The cinema has long been attracted to photographing great cultural icons. This article provides a thorough account of the celluloid life of one of Australia's most distinctive landmarks.' (Publisher's abstract)
Last amended 2 Dec 2014 07:09:05
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