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Courtesy of Allen & Unwin
y separately published work icon The Little Refugee single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 The Little Refugee
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Giant waves crashed down on our little boat. I was terrified but my mum hugged me tight and told me, "Everything will be okay. Don't worry, it will be okay." Anh Do nearly didn't make it to Australia. His entire family came close to losing their lives as they escaped from war-torn Vietnam in an overcrowded boat. It was a dangerous journey, with murderous pirates and terrifying storms, but they managed to survive. Life in suburban Australia was also hard for a small boy with no English and funny lunches. But there was a loving extended family, lots of friends, and always something to laugh about for Anh, his brother Khoa, and their sister Tram. And eventually for a young Anh, who tried hard to see the bright side of life no matter what the difficulty, there was triumph.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Exhibitions

7957836

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Teachers notes from publisher's website.

Notes

  • This is affiliated with Dr Laurel Cohn's Picture Book Diet because it contains representations of food and/or food practices.

    Food depiction
    • Incidental
    Food types
    • Everyday foods
    Food practices n/a
    Gender n/a
    Signage n/a
    Positive/negative value n/a
    Food as sense of place

    n/a

    Setting n/a
    Food as social cohesion n/a
    Food as cultural identity
    • Non-Anglo characters
    • Refugee story
    Food as character identity n/a
    Food as language n/a

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2011 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Allen & Unwin
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: November 2011
      ISBN: 9781742378329 (hbk.)

Works about this Work

The Politics of Picture Books : Stories of Displaced Children in Twenty-first-century Australia Mary Tomsic , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: History Australia , vol. 15 no. 2 2018; (p. 339-356)

'This article uses cultural representations to write refugee history. It examines twenty-first-century picture books about displaced children, alongside published responses to them, to explore how refugee experiences and histories are constructed, both for and about children, in an Australian context. The visual literary form of picture books as political texts is examined as a space for discussion and dialogue. Published responses to them, however, more commonly reveal rigid interpretations of imagined readers, invoking binary divisions between displaced and non-displaced children. Through these sources, questions of humanisation and (de)politicisations in refugee history are considered.'  (Publication abstract)

Encouraging Empathy through Picture Books About Migration Kumarasinghe Dissanayake Mudiyanselage , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 75-91)

Reading children’s literature is often considered important for developing readers’ empathy towards others. Picture books that thematise cultural diversity and issues of cultural difference often affirm positive models of cultural harmony and tolerance, thereby providing young readers with exemplars of human rights and social justice. Since 2000, many picture books have responded to Australia’s changing policy regarding immigration, especially the impact on refugees and asylum seekers. This chapter will discuss how picture books targeted for primary aged children engage with the subjective experience of migration and encourage readers to take up an empathic position with regard to the plight of others as represented in the texts. Picture books discussed in this chapter will include recent examples that deal with Asian-Australian relations, refugees, and asylum seekers. The chapter will have direct relevance to the cross-curriculum priority ‘Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia’, and will include the general capabilities: ethical understanding and intercultural understanding.

[Review] The Little Refugee Kaye Throssell , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 56 no. 1 2012; (p. 15)

— Review of The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book
Indie Gongs for Funder Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 11 March 2012; (p. 7)
Do and Co on Indie List Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 29 January 2012; (p. 7)
[Review] The Little Refugee Lisa Greenaway , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , November vol. 26 no. 5 2011; (p. 22-23)

— Review of The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book
Dangerous Waters Joy Lawn , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December 2011-January 2012 no. 337 2011; (p. 74-75)

— Review of The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book ; Sam, Grace and the Shipwreck Michelle Gillespie , 2011 single work picture book ; The Road to Goonong David Cox , 2011 single work picture book ; Savannah Dreams Lolla Stewart , 2011 single work picture book ; All the Way to W.A. : Our Search for Uncle Kev Roland Harvey , 2011 single work picture book ; One Small Island Alison Lester , 2011 single work picture book ; Flood Jackie French , 2011 single work picture book
[Review] The Little Refugee Katharine England , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 3 December 2011; (p. 3)

— Review of The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book
The Many Faces of Australia Stephanie Owen Reeder , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 December 2011; (p. 20)

— Review of Ten Blue Wrens : And What a Lot of Wattle! Elizabeth Honey , 2011 single work picture book ; The Road to Goonong David Cox , 2011 single work picture book ; All the Way to W.A. : Our Search for Uncle Kev Roland Harvey , 2011 single work picture book ; The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book ; A Bus Called Heaven Bob Graham , 2011 single work picture book
[Review] The Little Refugee Kaye Throssell , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 56 no. 1 2012; (p. 15)

— Review of The Little Refugee Anh Do , Suzanne Do , 2011 single work picture book
Little Refugee Tells Kids a Tall Tale Carolyn Webb , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 4 August 2011; (p. 5)
Ghostwriter Slur Hurts, But Anh Do Still Happiest Refugee Sacha Molitorisz , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 November 2011; (p. 9)
Do and Co on Indie List Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 29 January 2012; (p. 7)
Indie Gongs for Funder Marc McEvoy , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 11 March 2012; (p. 7)
Encouraging Empathy through Picture Books About Migration Kumarasinghe Dissanayake Mudiyanselage , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 75-91)

Reading children’s literature is often considered important for developing readers’ empathy towards others. Picture books that thematise cultural diversity and issues of cultural difference often affirm positive models of cultural harmony and tolerance, thereby providing young readers with exemplars of human rights and social justice. Since 2000, many picture books have responded to Australia’s changing policy regarding immigration, especially the impact on refugees and asylum seekers. This chapter will discuss how picture books targeted for primary aged children engage with the subjective experience of migration and encourage readers to take up an empathic position with regard to the plight of others as represented in the texts. Picture books discussed in this chapter will include recent examples that deal with Asian-Australian relations, refugees, and asylum seekers. The chapter will have direct relevance to the cross-curriculum priority ‘Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia’, and will include the general capabilities: ethical understanding and intercultural understanding.

Last amended 26 Nov 2018 09:34:36
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