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y separately published work icon The Timeless Land single work   novel   historical fiction  
Is part of Timeless Land Trilogy 1941 series - author novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1941... 1941 The Timeless Land
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The year 1788: the very beginning of European settlement. These were times of hardship, cruelty and danger. Above all, they were times of conflict between the Aborigines and the white settlers.

'Eleanor Dark brings alive those bitter years with moments of tenderness and conciliation amid the brutality and hostility. The cast of characters includes figures historical and fictional, black and white, convict and settler. All the while, beneath the veneer of British civilisation, lies the baffling presence of Australia, the 'timeless land'.

'The Storm of Time and No Barrier complete the Timeless Land trilogy. ' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: For my son Michael Dark.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Macmillan ,
      1941 .
      image of person or book cover 5119176707943851635.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: ix, 499p.p.
      Note/s:
      • The UK edition has long been regarded as the first. However, it has been established that the US edition was published in September 1941, with the UK edition appearing the following month.
      • Map on endpapers.
      • Glossary on pp. 497-499.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins ,
      1941 .
      Note/s:
      • Map on endpapers.
      • Reprinted many times between 1942 and 1965 in Australia, some by Halstead Press and New Century Press.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fontana ,
      1973 .
      Extent: 544p.
      ISBN: 0006132774 (pbk)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Imprint , 1989 .
      Extent: 620p.
      ISBN: 0732225302 (pbk.)
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2002 .
      Extent: xxxi, 525pp.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Barbara Brooks and Humphrey McQueen.
      • Includes 'Glossary of Aboriginal Words and Phrases' (p.xxix-xxxi).
      ISBN: 0207198772
    • Sydney South, South Sydney area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2013 .
      image of person or book cover 1905651670219175494.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 544p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 1st March 2013
      ISBN: 9780732296926
      Series: y separately published work icon A and R Classics Angus and Robertson (publisher), Z1411167 series - publisher
Alternative title: Gōshū : chōhen shōsetsu
Language: Japanese
    • Tokyo, Honshu,
      c
      Japan,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Yūkōsha ,
      1942 .
      Extent: 465p.

Works about this Work

A Makarrata Declaration : A Declaration of Our Country Stan Grant , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Best Australian Essays 2017 2017; (p. 41-50)

'Salman Rushdie — the great Indian writer — once said of the importance of stories: 'Those that do not have the power over the story that dominates their lives, the power to re-tell it, re-think it, deconstruct it, joke about it, and change it as times change, truly are powerless because they cannot think new thoughts.' ' (41)
 

‘This Long and Shining Finger of the Sea Itself’ : Sydney Harbour and Regional Cosmopolitanism in Eleanor Dark’s Waterway Melinda J. Cooper , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 1 2017;

'In Eleanor Dark’s novel Waterway (1938), Professor Channon is prompted by the ominous international headline ‘Failure of Peace Talks’ to imagine the world from a global perspective (120). Channon feels himself metaphorically ‘lifted away from the earth … seeing it from an incredible distance, and with an incredible, an all-embracing comprehension’ (119-20). This move outward from a located perspective to ‘a more detached overview of a wider global space’ signifies a cosmopolitan viewpoint, ‘in which the viewing subject rises above the placebound attachments of the nation-state to take the measure of the world as a wider totality’ (Hegglund 8-9). Yet even this global view is mediated by Channon’s position from within ‘a great island continent alone in its south sea’ (121). Gazing from a ‘vast distance,’ he views Europe as ‘the patches where parasitic man had lived longest and most densely,’ and from which humankind ‘went out to infect fresh lands’ (120). This description of old world Europe as ‘parasitic’ provides a glimpse of resistant nationalism, reflecting Channon’s location within one of the ‘fresh lands’ affected by colonisation. Channon is ultimately unable to sustain a ‘Godlike’ perspective in this scene, desiring ‘nothing but to return’ to local place (121). Although his view initially ‘vaults beyond the bounds of national affiliation’ (Alexander and Moran 4), this move outward does not ‘nullify an affective attachment to the more grounded locations of human attachment’ (Hegglund 20). Channon’s return to the ‘shabby home … of his own humanity’ brings a renewed sense of connection to ‘the sun-warmed rail of the gate’ and ‘the faint breeze [which] ruffled the hair back from his forehead’ (122).' (Introduction)

Indigenous Lives, The ‘Cult of Forgetfulness’ and the Australian Dictionary of Biography Malcolm Allbrook , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 1 November 2017;

'In 1968 the esteemed Australian anthropologist Bill Stanner coined the term “the great Australian silence” to describe a “cult of forgetfulness” that had seen Aboriginal people virtually ignored in the writing of Australian history. The Australian Dictionary of Biography had published its first two volumes by then, and the indifference that Stanner observed was already apparent in its choice of biographical subjects.

'The architects of the dictionary had envisaged a great national co-operative venture with autonomous working parties in each state whose members would choose “significant and representative” subjects, a “cross-section of Australian society”. In succinct articles, these lives would collectively illustrate the Australian national story.'

Modernist Fiction/Alternative Modernisms : Australia, Canada, New Zealand Anouk Lang , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Novel in English : The Novel in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific Since 1950 2017; (p. 190-204)

'What is it about modernism, that multivalent category riven with internal contradictions, that makes literary criticism continue to value it as a category?...' (Introduction)

Australia in Three Books Paul Daley , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 76 no. 1 2017; (p. 19-22)
'I’ve chosen authors born in the twentieth century, whose work was published over a span of not quite half a century, from 1941 to the year of the bicentenary, 1988. I know: I’ve chosen three books published over some 47 years when there’s almost another 230 colonial and post-colonial years and, of course, 60,000 more with rich stories of continental habitation to choose from.' (Introduction)
Out of Australia Hassoldt Davis , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Nation , 4 October vol. 153 no. 14 1941; (p. 316)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark , 1941 single work novel
As It Was Then Margaret Walkom , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 24 no. 1 1964; (p. 68-69)

— Review of No Barrier Eleanor Dark , 1953 single work novel ; The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark , 1941 single work novel ; Storm of Time Eleanor Dark , 1948 single work novel
Redemption R. D. Charques , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 1 November no. 2074 1941; (p. 541)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark , 1941 single work novel
Untitled M. Rugoff , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: New York Herald Tribune , 5 October 1941;

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark , 1941 single work novel
Untitled M. Rugoff , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 5 October 1941;

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark , 1941 single work novel
Story for Our Times R. Hodgman , 2006 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 January 2006; (p. 24)
'Book News' Arranges for Exhibit J. U. , 1947 single work column
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , April vol. 1 no. 10 1947; (p. 443)
Book News persuades the Department of Post War Reconstruction to include Australian literature in the Australian section of the British Empire Exhibition at the Royal Easter Show. Book News calls once more for a National Book League.
Can You Better This Book List? 1945 single work column
— Appears in: Book News , August no. [1] 1945; (p. 3)
y separately published work icon Understanding the Novel: The Timeless Land A. K. Thomson , Brisbane : Jacaranda Press , 1966 Z23192 1966 single work criticism
The Progress of Eleanor Dark G. A. Wilkes , 1951 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 12 no. 3 1951; (p. 139-148)
Last amended 16 Jul 2015 09:50:23
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