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y separately published work icon The Little Company single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1945... 1945 The Little Company
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Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Virago , 1985 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Drusilla Modjeska , 1985 single work criticism
Modjeska argues that the complex narrative structure of The Little Company invites the reader to participate in the textual dialogue with society. In the novel political questions are deeply entwined with personal questions and many of these issues find parallels in Eleanor Dark's life. Modjeska argues that the behaviour of people during the extraordinary period of the Second World War reveals the contradictory experiences of several characters in the novel and demonstrates the effect that social conditions can have on identity.
(p. ix-xxi)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

‘This Long and Shining Finger of the Sea Itself’ : Sydney Harbour and Regional Cosmopolitanism in Eleanor Dark’s Waterway Melinda J. Cooper , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 1 2017;

'In Eleanor Dark’s novel Waterway (1938), Professor Channon is prompted by the ominous international headline ‘Failure of Peace Talks’ to imagine the world from a global perspective (120). Channon feels himself metaphorically ‘lifted away from the earth … seeing it from an incredible distance, and with an incredible, an all-embracing comprehension’ (119-20). This move outward from a located perspective to ‘a more detached overview of a wider global space’ signifies a cosmopolitan viewpoint, ‘in which the viewing subject rises above the placebound attachments of the nation-state to take the measure of the world as a wider totality’ (Hegglund 8-9). Yet even this global view is mediated by Channon’s position from within ‘a great island continent alone in its south sea’ (121). Gazing from a ‘vast distance,’ he views Europe as ‘the patches where parasitic man had lived longest and most densely,’ and from which humankind ‘went out to infect fresh lands’ (120). This description of old world Europe as ‘parasitic’ provides a glimpse of resistant nationalism, reflecting Channon’s location within one of the ‘fresh lands’ affected by colonisation. Channon is ultimately unable to sustain a ‘Godlike’ perspective in this scene, desiring ‘nothing but to return’ to local place (121). Although his view initially ‘vaults beyond the bounds of national affiliation’ (Alexander and Moran 4), this move outward does not ‘nullify an affective attachment to the more grounded locations of human attachment’ (Hegglund 20). Channon’s return to the ‘shabby home … of his own humanity’ brings a renewed sense of connection to ‘the sun-warmed rail of the gate’ and ‘the faint breeze [which] ruffled the hair back from his forehead’ (122).' (Introduction)

Traumatic Cosmopolitanism : Eleanor Dark and the World at War Jessica Gildersleeve , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 41 no. 1-2 2015; (p. 7-17)
'This essay argues that women writers working during and prior to the Second World War produced works which might be identified as examples of "traumatic cosmopolitanism"-that is, a cosmopolitanism forged through the shared experience of trauma. In narrativising their shared, global traumatic experience, and in particular, the experience of being a writer during this time, wartime women writers effectively construct a community of (thinking about and writing about) suffering which moves beyond the national discourses of jingoism and ignorance that can perpetuate trauma and violence. With a focus on Eleanor Dark's wartime novel The Little Company (1945), this essay suggests that Australian women writers of the Second World War are at the vanguard of such ethical projects for the ways they challenge the lapse into nationalist dichotomous discourses of war, and considers the dual sense of psychological threat and the ethical responsibility of the writer which is figured in such works.' (Publication abstract)
Armed with Fruit-Knives : Transgression in Australian Women's Modernist Still-Lifes Rosemary Lloyd , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magnificent Obsessions : Honouring the Lives of Hazel Rowley 2013; (p. 202-218)
“Dazzling” Dark – Lantana Lane (1959) Helen O'Reilly , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 71-80)
'World War II, and the Cold War which followed it, were years of stresses and strain for Eleanor Dark. When Lantana Lane appeared in 1959, signalling, as it turned out, the end of her literary career and seemingly light years away from her previous work, it was the culmination of two intense decades. At the beginning of 1940 she was still engaged in the long, laborious research for The Timeless Land trilogy, making daily trips to the Mitchell Library, even in the dead of winter. She was sharing the civilian experience of food shortages, wartime restrictions and rationing. Despite the popular and critical success of The Timeless Land (1941), top of The London Times' Christmas fiction list and the Book of the Month in the U.S. in October, repeatedly in letters to her publishers Dark declared herself "bothered" by her immersion in the past.' (Author's abstract)
Country Matters in the Little (Southern Steel) Company Donna Coates , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , December vol. 35 no. 2008; (p. 78-94)
A discussion of similarities in venue, time and pre-occupations (Australian cities' and industries' vulnerability to sea attack during WWII, 'cultural cringe' of the '1950s) in Eleanor Dark's The Little Company and Dymphna Cusack's Southern Steel, with reference to Cusack's defence of Australian literature and development of regional awareness in her Newcastle setting, and Dark's exploration of a new love for the Australian landscape, and the awareness of national history in both.
The Soul of Australia at War L.C.R. , 1945 single work review
— Appears in: Book News , August no. [1] 1945; (p. 2)

— Review of The Little Company Eleanor Dark , 1945 single work novel
Untitled 1945 single work review
— Appears in: Australia's Progress , 24 August 1945;

— Review of The Little Company Eleanor Dark , 1945 single work novel
Untitled 1945 single work review
— Appears in: The Telegraph (Sydney) , 14 July 1945;

— Review of The Little Company Eleanor Dark , 1945 single work novel
Untitled D. E. , 1945 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 4 August no. 33577 1945; (p. 8)

— Review of The Little Company Eleanor Dark , 1945 single work novel
Untitled J. Martin , 1945 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 20 May 1945;

— Review of The Little Company Eleanor Dark , 1945 single work novel
The Australian Home-Front Novel of the Second World War: Genre, Gender and Region William Hatherell , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 23 no. 1 2007; (p. 79-91)
Linda's Linoleum : Visual Imaging in Eleanor Dark's 'Prelude to Christopher'. Helen O'Reilly , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 68 no. 1 2008; (p. 95-103)
Country Matters in the Little (Southern Steel) Company Donna Coates , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , December vol. 35 no. 2008; (p. 78-94)
A discussion of similarities in venue, time and pre-occupations (Australian cities' and industries' vulnerability to sea attack during WWII, 'cultural cringe' of the '1950s) in Eleanor Dark's The Little Company and Dymphna Cusack's Southern Steel, with reference to Cusack's defence of Australian literature and development of regional awareness in her Newcastle setting, and Dark's exploration of a new love for the Australian landscape, and the awareness of national history in both.
'As the Past Coils Like a Spring' : Bridging the History of Australian Women Writers with Contemporary Australian Women Writers' Stories Odette Kelada , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lilith , vol. 15 no. 2006; (p. 48-60)
'This article draws on interview excerpts with contemporary women writers to examine how the stories of past Australian women writers can be linked with the lives of women writing in Australia at the present time' (p. 48)
“Dazzling” Dark – Lantana Lane (1959) Helen O'Reilly , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 71-80)
'World War II, and the Cold War which followed it, were years of stresses and strain for Eleanor Dark. When Lantana Lane appeared in 1959, signalling, as it turned out, the end of her literary career and seemingly light years away from her previous work, it was the culmination of two intense decades. At the beginning of 1940 she was still engaged in the long, laborious research for The Timeless Land trilogy, making daily trips to the Mitchell Library, even in the dead of winter. She was sharing the civilian experience of food shortages, wartime restrictions and rationing. Despite the popular and critical success of The Timeless Land (1941), top of The London Times' Christmas fiction list and the Book of the Month in the U.S. in October, repeatedly in letters to her publishers Dark declared herself "bothered" by her immersion in the past.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 16 Feb 2007 15:15:54
Settings:
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
  • Katoomba, Blue Mountains, Sydney, New South Wales,
  • 1940s
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