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form y separately published work icon 33 Postcards single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 33 Postcards
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Sixteen-year-old Mei Mei has dreamt of meeting her Australian sponsor and pen-friend Dean Randall and his "perfect family" for ten years. When her orphanage travels to Australia to attend a choir festival, Mei Mei disobeys the school leader and sets out to find him, navigating unfamiliar streets with the help of Carl, the charismatic son of a dodgy car dealer. When she discovers that the idyllic life Dean depicted in his postcards is far from the truth, Mei Mei remains tenacious in her efforts to connect with him.' Source: http://sff.org.au/films-container/33-postcards/ (Sighted 08/06/2011)

Notes

  • World premiere at the Sydney Film Festival 8-19 June 2011.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Theorising Film Festivals as Distributors and Investigating the Post-Festival Distribution of Australian Films Lauren Carroll Harris , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 11 no. 2 2017; (p. 46-58)

This paper theorises film festivals as distribution circuits, positioning film festivals in the broader cinema ecology to assess their role in delivering local films to local audiences. Recasting current research trends into film festivals through the lens of distribution enables us to see how festivals function as more than another exhibition screen - as a type of distributor. I offer a case study of Sydney Film Festival to explore the following research questions: What is the distributive function and nature of film festivals for Australian films? What happens to local titles following their festival runs? How can we explain the gap between Australian films' continued popularity at film festivals and their continued under-performance in the rest of the marketplace? In answering these questions, this article demonstrates how film festivals have become crucial to both the Australian film industry and the cinema industry at large over the last 10 years, to the point that they have almost replaced the art-house circuit and come to provide an essential, highly specialised distribution channel for small to medium budget films. For this reason, I argue that material and economic drivers are as essential to the current boon in film festivals as cultural ones, and that the film festival circuit has not been able to address the problem of distribution for auteurist, independent and art cinema in an age of digitisation. I present evidence that localises, concretises and specifies festival research, suggesting the major festivals in Australia are an increasingly discrete and self-contained distribution sector within the wider cinema ecology, which has significant implications for theorisations of festivals as feeders for theatrical circuits.

Strong Selection for Second AACTA Awards Michael Bodey , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 29 August 2012; (p. 15)
Special Delivery Michael Bodey , 2011 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29 - 30 October 2011; (p. 14)
'Pauline Chan had more on her mind than trifling medical issues after taking a heavy fall down a staircase. As the director of 33 Postcards recovered in July from her New York tumble, she fretted about how she would make it to Australia two weeks later. Her film, the first SinoAustralian joint production to win distribution in this country after the 2007 signing of a bilateral treaty of co-operation, was to have its premiere at the Melbourne International Film Festival' (14).
Thinking Big Rosalie Higson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20 - 21 August 2011; (p. 14-15)

— Review of 33 Postcards Pauline Chan , Martin Edmond , Philip Dalkin , 2011 single work film/TV
Filmmakers Say Hello to Chinawood Sacha Molitorisz , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 June 2011; (p. 18)
Thinking Big Rosalie Higson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20 - 21 August 2011; (p. 14-15)

— Review of 33 Postcards Pauline Chan , Martin Edmond , Philip Dalkin , 2011 single work film/TV
Filmmakers Say Hello to Chinawood Sacha Molitorisz , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 June 2011; (p. 18)
Special Delivery Michael Bodey , 2011 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29 - 30 October 2011; (p. 14)
'Pauline Chan had more on her mind than trifling medical issues after taking a heavy fall down a staircase. As the director of 33 Postcards recovered in July from her New York tumble, she fretted about how she would make it to Australia two weeks later. Her film, the first SinoAustralian joint production to win distribution in this country after the 2007 signing of a bilateral treaty of co-operation, was to have its premiere at the Melbourne International Film Festival' (14).
Strong Selection for Second AACTA Awards Michael Bodey , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 29 August 2012; (p. 15)
Theorising Film Festivals as Distributors and Investigating the Post-Festival Distribution of Australian Films Lauren Carroll Harris , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 11 no. 2 2017; (p. 46-58)

This paper theorises film festivals as distribution circuits, positioning film festivals in the broader cinema ecology to assess their role in delivering local films to local audiences. Recasting current research trends into film festivals through the lens of distribution enables us to see how festivals function as more than another exhibition screen - as a type of distributor. I offer a case study of Sydney Film Festival to explore the following research questions: What is the distributive function and nature of film festivals for Australian films? What happens to local titles following their festival runs? How can we explain the gap between Australian films' continued popularity at film festivals and their continued under-performance in the rest of the marketplace? In answering these questions, this article demonstrates how film festivals have become crucial to both the Australian film industry and the cinema industry at large over the last 10 years, to the point that they have almost replaced the art-house circuit and come to provide an essential, highly specialised distribution channel for small to medium budget films. For this reason, I argue that material and economic drivers are as essential to the current boon in film festivals as cultural ones, and that the film festival circuit has not been able to address the problem of distribution for auteurist, independent and art cinema in an age of digitisation. I present evidence that localises, concretises and specifies festival research, suggesting the major festivals in Australia are an increasingly discrete and self-contained distribution sector within the wider cinema ecology, which has significant implications for theorisations of festivals as feeders for theatrical circuits.

Last amended 24 Jun 2011 15:04:23
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