AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Cow selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Cow
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Notes

  • Dedication: For Renate
  • Epigraph:
    In the beginning, the skin of cattle was the skin that
    humans have now, and the skin of a human was the
    skin cattle have now.
    -Jaiminiya-Brahmana (c600 BCE)
  • A collection in four parts:
    String One - The Philosophy Cow
    String Two - What the Philosophers Say
    String Three - What the Lovers Say
    String Four - What Queenie Says About the Philosophy Cow

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,:Spinifex Press , 2011 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
What the Poet Saysi"I picture a cow", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 1-7)
Queenie's Dilly Bag, Susan Hawthorne , 2011 sequence poetry (p. 10-59)
What She Says to Her Listenersi"takes are long and short", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 11)
What Queenie Saysi"I’m grazing near a human encampment", Susan Hawthorne , 2010 single work poetry (p. 12)
Note: With Epigraph:
queenie queenie who's got he ball?
meanie meanie no one at all
What Fatima Says about Queeniei"Queenie found a place to graze", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 13-14)
What Queenie Says about Meenai"I knew from the first kick", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 15-16)
What the Prophet Saysi"she lives in an ancient landscape / myth", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 17-18)
What the Mayor Saysi"this cow is asking for trouble", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 19)
What She Says to Themi"who will throw", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 20-21)
What Queenie Says about Sitai"Sita is no slouch just a woman", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 22-25)
What Cows and Calves Sayi"thunder bolting at high speed", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 26)
What Demeter Says to Persephonei"next time tell me when you're about to wander off on your own", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 27)
What Persephone Says to Demeteri"you know I thought I could trust him", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 28)
What Queenie Says about Triviai"three cows meet on a roadside", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 29-30)
What Kuvalaya Saysi"rain clouds are gathering at the edge of the world", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 31)
What Sita Saysi"I'm straight and I'm deep", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 32)
What She Says about Shadowsi"A cow and her shadow", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 34)
What She Says about Elektrai"at midday the shadows crumple", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 34-35)
What She Says about Lakshmi and Sarasvatii"things are not as they appear", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 36-37)
What She Says about Ereshkigali"a coracle of cattle sailed the black waters", Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work poetry (p. 38)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Australian Tongue and Ag-gag Law Iris Ralph , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 6 2016-2017; (p. 50-61)
'In this essay, I comment on two histories of animal farming in Australia in an ecocritical reading of several works of Australian literature: Tim Winton’s novel Shallows (1984), Susan Hawthorne’s collection of poetry, Cow (2011) and Francesca Rendle-Short’s novel Bite Your Tongue (2011). The first of those histories, the background of Shallows, refers to the whaling industry that operated in Western Australian waters up through the 1970s and the growing public awareness of that industry that eventually drove it to a halt in 1978, the year the main events of the novel take place. Cow and Bite Your Tongue, the texts that I mostly discuss, carry references to the history of industrial farming of cows in Australia, which, along with the industrial farming of other domesticated animal species, exploded after 1970 (in Australia and elsewhere in urban-industrialising countries), the same decade when Australians were beginning to rally behind animal rights activists’ opposition to whale slaughter. Today, almost half a century later, animal advocacy activists continue to raise pressing questions about animal species that are industrially farmed. They are doing so at the same time as the meat industry is attempting to restrict public access to and information about its operations. I address those questions in my reading of Hawthorne’s paean to cows and Rendle-Short’s references to the Moral Right movement in Queensland in the 1970s and attempts by its supporters to remove works of literature from school book shelves.' (Publication abstract)
Jennifer Mackenzie Reviews Cow Jennifer Mackenzie , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , February 2014;

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
“… Go Out to the World of Cow” – Listening to Queenie, Sappho and Hawthorne : Sarah St Vincent Welch Reviews ‘Cow’ by Susan Hawthorne Sarah St Vincent Welch , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , September - November no. 9 2013;

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
Of Cyclones and Bovines: Living in the Torrid Zone Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 55-62)
The Interview : Susan Hawthorne Talks with Heather Taylor Johnson Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2011 single work interview
— Appears in: Wet Ink , no. 25 2011; (p. 30-34)
Heather Taylor Johnson Reviews Cow by Susan Hawthorne Heather Taylor Johnson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , May no. 9 2011;

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
[Review] Cow Lindy Warrell , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Wet Ink , no. 24 2011; (p. 53-54)

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
“… Go Out to the World of Cow” – Listening to Queenie, Sappho and Hawthorne : Sarah St Vincent Welch Reviews ‘Cow’ by Susan Hawthorne Sarah St Vincent Welch , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , September - November no. 9 2013;

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
Jennifer Mackenzie Reviews Cow Jennifer Mackenzie , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , February 2014;

— Review of Cow Susan Hawthorne , 2011 selected work poetry
The Interview : Susan Hawthorne Talks with Heather Taylor Johnson Heather Taylor Johnson (interviewer), 2011 single work interview
— Appears in: Wet Ink , no. 25 2011; (p. 30-34)
Of Cyclones and Bovines: Living in the Torrid Zone Susan Hawthorne , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 55-62)
Australian Tongue and Ag-gag Law Iris Ralph , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 6 2016-2017; (p. 50-61)
'In this essay, I comment on two histories of animal farming in Australia in an ecocritical reading of several works of Australian literature: Tim Winton’s novel Shallows (1984), Susan Hawthorne’s collection of poetry, Cow (2011) and Francesca Rendle-Short’s novel Bite Your Tongue (2011). The first of those histories, the background of Shallows, refers to the whaling industry that operated in Western Australian waters up through the 1970s and the growing public awareness of that industry that eventually drove it to a halt in 1978, the year the main events of the novel take place. Cow and Bite Your Tongue, the texts that I mostly discuss, carry references to the history of industrial farming of cows in Australia, which, along with the industrial farming of other domesticated animal species, exploded after 1970 (in Australia and elsewhere in urban-industrialising countries), the same decade when Australians were beginning to rally behind animal rights activists’ opposition to whale slaughter. Today, almost half a century later, animal advocacy activists continue to raise pressing questions about animal species that are industrially farmed. They are doing so at the same time as the meat industry is attempting to restrict public access to and information about its operations. I address those questions in my reading of Hawthorne’s paean to cows and Rendle-Short’s references to the Moral Right movement in Queensland in the 1970s and attempts by its supporters to remove works of literature from school book shelves.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 21 Jun 2013 12:24:01
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X