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form y separately published work icon Angry Boys series - publisher   film/TV   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Angry Boys
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The chameleon of character invention, writer/performer Chris Lilley brings to life six vastly different characters, but they all have one thing in common - they will entertain and intrigue, as their private worlds are revealed.

'Still living on the family farm in Dunt, identical twins Daniel and Nathan Sims, who appeared in We Can Be Heroes, are back. Joining the boys in the series are four new characters; former surfing world champion Blake Oakfield, a family man and founding member of a surfie gang - the Mucca Mad Boys; S.mouse a U.S. rapper famous for having produced the biggest selling hip-hop single of all time; Japanese mother Jen Okazaki, a shrewd businesswoman, she also manages her son's skateboarding career; and Juvenile Justice Centre for Boys officer Ruth Sims, aka Gran. Gran takes pride in looking after the 'worst boys in the state' and can be as tough on the boys as she is kind to them.'

Source: ABC1 website, http://www.abc.net.au/tv/
Sighted: 09/05/2011

Notes

  • For further information, see the official Angry Boys website: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/angryboys/

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'Your Heart Goes Out to the Australian Tourist Board' Critical Uncertainty and the Management of Censure in Chris Lilley's TV Comedies Julia Gayley Erhart , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 27 no. 3 2013; (p. 434-445)
Chris Lilley's domestic reputation as a writer and creator of nationally award-winning material has largely not suffered, in contrast to other shows featuring provocative themes. What is distinctive about Lilley's work that allows him to forestall accusations of ‘racism’ that other shows would face? In order to address these questions, this article investigates key components of Lilley's comedies in three major contexts. First, I consider the work in the framework of post-2000 Australia. How might the depicted themes of aspiration and disenfranchisement dispose at least ‘middle’ Australian viewers to find favour with Lilley? Second, I look at the material in the context of ‘cringe’ comedy. A key theme that emerges throughout critical appraisals is the uncertainty about the ethical value of the humour. How do Lilley's shows create a sense of critical ambiguity that plays out in Lilley's favour? Finally, I examine the framing of Lilley's non-white characters, contrasting critical responses to them with the reception of another well-known performance of blackface on Hey Hey It's Saturday. How might the more contained criticism of performance and scripting flaws (that Lilley's work received) displace more serious charges?' (Author's abstract)
Slap Set to Ring around World as US Networks Come Looking for Drama Michael Idato , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 October 2012; (p. 3)
Lilley Facebook Ban 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 17 June 2012; (p. 5)
Cultural Creep Nick Bryant , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Winter no. 36 2012; (p. 118-131)
'TODAY it would be called a reality show, but in the early 1950s the Australian Broadcasting Commission's Incognito was billed as light entertainment. Alas, no recording of the radio program survives in the corporation's vast audio archive. Nor does it earn a mention in Ken Inglis's two-volume authorised history of the ABC. Yet Incognito is one of the most influential programs the national broadcaster has ever put to air, if only because it caught the ear of the Melbourne-based critic AA Phillips. The idea, thought Phillips, was quaint enough: to pit a local artist against a foreign guest, with the audience asked to adjudicate. Occasionally, listeners would favour the home-grown performer, thus producing 'a nice glow of patriotic satisfaction'. The program, however, was founded on the belittling premise that 'the domestic product will be worse than the imported article.' Phillips coined a neat description for this 'disease of the Australian mind' and immediately his aphorism, described in a 1950 Meanjin essay of the same name, took hold: 'the cultural cringe'.' (Author's introduction)
Lilley-Livered Scripts Fizzle Geoff Shearer , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 December 2011; (p. 60)

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Show of the Week Paul Kalina , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 May 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Edgy Reality Graeme Blundell , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7- 8 May 2011; (p. 27-28)

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Untitled Jim Schembri , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 23 June 2011; (p. 41)

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Chris Lilley's Juvenile Justice Role Model Tim Kroenert , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 22 May vol. 21 no. 10 2011;

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Untitled Paul Kalina , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 7 July 2011; (p. 37)

— Review of Angry Boys Chris Lilley , 2011 series - publisher film/TV
Riding a Comic Wave Ruth Ritchie , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7-8 May 2011; (p. 16)
Comedy That's All the Rage Debi Enker , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 May 2011; (p. 4)
Safe Australian Comedy Needs Edginess of Angry Boys Waleed Aly , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 15 May 2011; (p. 21)
A Bit Weird and Getting Paid for It Erin O'Dwyer , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 15 May 2011; (p. 3)
Where Are the Men in Our Young Boys' Lives? Peter West , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 16 May 2011; (p. 11)
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