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Image courtesy of Magabala Books
y separately published work icon Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon single work   graphic novel   young adult   adventure  
Is part of Ubby's Underdogs Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 series - author graphic novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Ubby is a smart, young Aboriginal girl who is twice as tough as the streets she lives on. She is the leader of a rag-tag group of youth known as the 'Underdogs'. When Ubby meets Sai Fong, a Chinese girl who has arrived fresh off the boat from Beijing, street life in Broome takes on a multitude of new dimensions. From the moment the two girls meet, they find themselves immersed in a series of bizarre adventures influenced by Aboriginal and Chinese myths and legend, and secrets never before exposed.

'This is a heroic tale that measures the limits of courage and friendship. Ubby's Underdogs: The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon boasts a multifaceted narrative with staggering graphic detail in order to introduce a series of complex characters with links to other worlds. Amidst a backdrop of fictionalised Aboriginal and Chinese mythology in the unique multicultural town of Broome, Brenton's first graphic novel leaves you gasping for air and in anticipation of things to come.'

(Source: Magabala Books website; http://www.magabala.com)

Exhibitions

6885591
11425170
8875784
8857854
11469221
11468710

Reading Australia

Reading Australia

This work has Reading Australia teaching resources.

Unit Suitable For

AC: Year 7 (NSW Stage 4)

Themes

bravery, bullying, colonialism, corruption, friendship, gender roles and stereotypes, humour, interracial, magic realism, Myths and Legends, racism, satire, social class

General Capabilities

Critical and creative thinking, Ethical understanding, Information and communication technology, Intercultural understanding, Literacy, Personal and social

Cross-curriculum Priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia

Notes

  • Ages: upper primary and young adults.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it contains Chinese characters, with strong references to Chinese mythology and culture.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2011 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Magabala Books
      Extent: 160p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 9781921248313 (pbk)

Works about this Work

Getting Indigenous Voices into the Classroom Ellen van Neerven , single work essay
— Appears in: Splash (ABC)
'Teaching books by Indigenous authors has a huge impact on both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, explains author Ellen van Neerven.'
Ubby's Underdogs : A Transformative Vision of Australian Community Clare Bradford , Cathy Sly , Xu Daozhi , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , vol. 24 no. 1 2016; (p. 101-131)

"The ‘Ubby’s Underdogs’ books are the first graphic novels published by Magabala Books,representing an innovation which maintains the inventiveness characteristic of Magabala’s picture books. The trilogy’s treatment of the Underdogs’ exploits in multicultural Broome foregrounds the encounter between Aboriginal and Chinese cultural traditions. By drawing on a blend of cultural signifiers, the novels display the carnivalesque qualities described by Mikhail Bakhtin in Rabelais and His World (1984). In McKenna’s novels carnivalesque scenes, polyglot voices and intercultural dialogues give rise to a transformative vision of a community which resists monologic authoritarianism. Like graphic novels more generally, the Underdogs novels rely on visual, verbal and cultural stereotypes to enable rapid identification of characters of various ethnicities. They transform such stereotypical and exoticised figures through modes of representation and narrative which privilege the ‘culture of folk carnival humour’ (Bakhtin 1984, p. 4) to present negotiations between and across cultures in the setting of post-war Broome." (Introduction)

[Review] The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Deborah McPherson , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 47 no. 3 2012; (p. 92)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
[Review] The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon David Murphy , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Childrens' Book Council of Australia , August vol. 55 no. 3 2011; (p. 27)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
Review : Ubby's Underdogs Bernard Caleo , 2011-2012 single work review
— Appears in: Southpaw , no. 1 2011-2012; (p. 164-166)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
Off the Shelf : Graphic Novel Owen Richardson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 7 May 2011; (p. 28)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
[Review] The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Katharine England , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 25 June 2011; (p. 27)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
[Review] The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Margaret Robson Kett , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 42)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
[Review] The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Pauline Hosking , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 25 no. 3 2011; (p. 27)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
Review : Ubby's Underdogs Bernard Caleo , 2011-2012 single work review
— Appears in: Southpaw , no. 1 2011-2012; (p. 164-166)

— Review of Ubby's Underdogs : The Legend of the Phoenix Dragon Brenton E. McKenna , 2011 single work graphic novel
Getting Indigenous Voices into the Classroom Ellen van Neerven , single work essay
— Appears in: Splash (ABC)
'Teaching books by Indigenous authors has a huge impact on both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, explains author Ellen van Neerven.'
Ubby's Underdogs : A Transformative Vision of Australian Community Clare Bradford , Cathy Sly , Xu Daozhi , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , vol. 24 no. 1 2016; (p. 101-131)

"The ‘Ubby’s Underdogs’ books are the first graphic novels published by Magabala Books,representing an innovation which maintains the inventiveness characteristic of Magabala’s picture books. The trilogy’s treatment of the Underdogs’ exploits in multicultural Broome foregrounds the encounter between Aboriginal and Chinese cultural traditions. By drawing on a blend of cultural signifiers, the novels display the carnivalesque qualities described by Mikhail Bakhtin in Rabelais and His World (1984). In McKenna’s novels carnivalesque scenes, polyglot voices and intercultural dialogues give rise to a transformative vision of a community which resists monologic authoritarianism. Like graphic novels more generally, the Underdogs novels rely on visual, verbal and cultural stereotypes to enable rapid identification of characters of various ethnicities. They transform such stereotypical and exoticised figures through modes of representation and narrative which privilege the ‘culture of folk carnival humour’ (Bakhtin 1984, p. 4) to present negotiations between and across cultures in the setting of post-war Broome." (Introduction)

Last amended 22 May 2017 15:51:04
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