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y separately published work icon Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces anthology   criticism   essay  
Issue Details: First known date: 2010... 2010 Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Halfway House is a collection of original, scholarly and inventive essays and images. It brings together writers who are both noted and new voices in contemporary discussions of Australian engagement with place. Rather than attempting to impose a uniform concept of Australian poetics, the contributors to Halfway House have investigated revealing situations, occasions and technology.

Using poetics in many senses, Halfway House is an exciting, original and provocative contribution to how Australians use, confront or avoid the place we live, its history, its environment and culture.' (Publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Crawley, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,:UWA Publishing , 2010 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Kairos for a Wounded Country, Jennifer Rutherford , 2010 single work criticism (p. 1-11)
Changescapes, Ross Gibson , 2010 single work criticism (p. 17-33)
Can You Argue with the Honeysuckle?, Stephen Muecke , 2010 single work criticism (p. 35-42)
Sensory Displacements : Migration and Australian Space, Mandy Thomas , 2010 single work criticism (p. 43-61)
The Halfway House, Alex Selenitsch , 2010 single work essay (p. 70-87)
Abandoned Cubby Huts : The Camera and Architecture as a Site of Dreaming, Daniel Armstrong , 2010 single work criticism (p. 89-112)
Undwelling; or Reading Bachelard in Australia, Jennifer Rutherford , 2010 single work criticism (p. 113-125)
The Forest in the Clearing : The Environmental Poetics of John Shaw Neilson, Paul Carter , 2010 single work criticism (p. 133-157)
German Romanticism, British Property and Indigenous Sovereignty : Landscape and Literature in Australia, Cassi Plate , 2010 single work criticism (p. 158-169)
Not Walking Falling : Performing Intimate Immensity, Rachel Fensham , 2010 single work criticism (p. 195-213)
Morphological Essence : Measurement Inexact, Yet Not Imprecise, Stuart Grant , 2010 single work criticism (p. 223-235)
Intimate Spaces : Poesis, Negativity and Spirit, Michael Brennan , 2010 single work criticism (p. 243-262)
The Geography of Visual and Poetic Space : The Melancholy Gaze from the Inside and from the Outside, A. M. McCulloch , 2010 single work criticism (p. 263-275)
"They Seemed Unbearably Foolish and Fragile" : Apple Trees, Intimacy and the Strangeness of Possession, Lisa Slater , 2010 single work criticism (p. 276-292)
Round Australia with Keith and Merle, Barbara Holloway , 2010 single work prose travel humour (p. 299-309)
Spatiality and Contaminated Land : Staging Maralinga, Joanne Tompkins , 2010 single work criticism (p. 310-319)
'Forget the True Shape of the Planet' : Greg Egan's Distress and the Ruins of Utopia, Brian Greenspan , 2010 single work criticism (p. 333-344)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

In/On/Of – The Mixed Poetics of Australian Spaces; or How I Found the Cubby. A Fictocritical Essay on White Australian (Un)Belonging Catherine Noske , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;
'The white Australian relationship with landscape is complicated by notions of belonging and ‘unbelonging’; while literary representations are often marked by complex, conflicting emotions. Defining and shaping these relationships are the prepositions with which we characterize separate spaces, each one signalling a different power balance and attitude, linked directly through language to the colonial past. Responding to the poetics of Australian spaces put forward in Jennifer Rutherford’s and Barbara Holloway’s Halfway House, this paper offers the heterotopia as one possible re-conceptualization of Australian space. Heterotopias focus on that which functions above and beyond the everyday, combining internal (emotional) and external (physical) constructions of space to create sites of importance to society. They juxtapose the fixed with the mutable and create a discourse of relation between the various spaces of our world. The cubby is such a space of juxtaposition, closed and intimate in its nature as a highly personal space, and yet simultaneously based within wider social relations and part of a highly normative childhood experience. In examining the cubby as a heterotopic space through a fictocritical remembrance of my own childhood, this paper attempts to represent both the complexity of belonging as a sensation for white Australians and the ‘heterochronic’ reality of the postcolonial nation.' (Author's abstract)
Untitled Barbara Brooks , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;

— Review of Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces 2010 anthology criticism essay
Untitled Barbara Brooks , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;

— Review of Halfway House : The Poetics of Australian Spaces 2010 anthology criticism essay
In/On/Of – The Mixed Poetics of Australian Spaces; or How I Found the Cubby. A Fictocritical Essay on White Australian (Un)Belonging Catherine Noske , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;
'The white Australian relationship with landscape is complicated by notions of belonging and ‘unbelonging’; while literary representations are often marked by complex, conflicting emotions. Defining and shaping these relationships are the prepositions with which we characterize separate spaces, each one signalling a different power balance and attitude, linked directly through language to the colonial past. Responding to the poetics of Australian spaces put forward in Jennifer Rutherford’s and Barbara Holloway’s Halfway House, this paper offers the heterotopia as one possible re-conceptualization of Australian space. Heterotopias focus on that which functions above and beyond the everyday, combining internal (emotional) and external (physical) constructions of space to create sites of importance to society. They juxtapose the fixed with the mutable and create a discourse of relation between the various spaces of our world. The cubby is such a space of juxtaposition, closed and intimate in its nature as a highly personal space, and yet simultaneously based within wider social relations and part of a highly normative childhood experience. In examining the cubby as a heterotopic space through a fictocritical remembrance of my own childhood, this paper attempts to represent both the complexity of belonging as a sensation for white Australians and the ‘heterochronic’ reality of the postcolonial nation.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 2 Dec 2010 14:22:23
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