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Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In the decades after World War II, the literary scene in Australia flourished: local writers garnered international renown and local publishers sought and produced more Australian books. The traditional view of this postwar period is of successful male writers, with women still confined to the domestic sphere. In Nine Lives, Susan Sheridan rewrites the pages of history to foreground the women writers who contributed equally to this literary renaissance.

'Sheridan traces the early careers of nine Australian women writers born between 1915 and 1925, who each achieved success between the mid 1940s and 1970s. Judith Wright and Thea Astley published quickly to resounding critical acclaim, while Gwen Harwood's frustration with chauvinistic literary editors prompted her pseudonymous poetry. Fiction writers Elizabeth Jolley, Amy Witting and Jessica Anderson remained unpublished until they were middle-aged; Rosemary Dobson, Dorothy Hewett and Dorothy Auchterlonie Green started strongly as poets in the 1940s, but either reduced their output or fell silent for the next twenty years.

'Sheridan considers why their careers developed differently from the careers of their male counterparts and how they balanced marriage, family and writing. This illuminating group biography offers a fresh perspective on mid-twentieth century Australian literature, and the women writers who helped to shape it.' (From the publisher's website.)

Contents

* Contents derived from the St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,:University of Queensland Press , 2011 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work criticism (p. 1-22)
Judith Wright Sets her Course, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 23-49)
Thea Astley : Charting a New Course, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 51-79)
Dorothy Hewett's Second Run, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 81-104)
Rosemary Dobson : A Clear Vocation, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 105-130)
Dorothy Auchterlonie Green : Woman of Letters, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 131-156)
Gwen Harwood Takes on the Poetry Pundits, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 157-182)
Jessica Anderson : Success Delayed, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 183-205)
Amy Witting's Struggle to Say 'I', Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work biography (p. 207-231)
Elizabeth Jolley : An Outsider Come in from the Cold, Susan Sheridan , 2011 single work bibliography (p. 233-254)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Leaving the Party : Dorothy Hewett, Literary Politics and the Long 1960s Fiona Morrison , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 36-50)

'What political, cultural and rhetorical changes occurred between the publication of Dorothy Hewett's nostalgic essay on Kylie Tenant in Westerly in late 1960 (Hewett, "How Beautiful Upon the Mountains") and her strikingly negative literary obituary of Katherine Susannah Prichard in Overland in late 1969 (Hewett, "Excess of Love: The Irrecon - cilable in Katharine Susannah Prichard")? The first of these essays offered a forthright series of criticisms about Tenant's interest in stylistic experimentation and the decline of her rather more interesting socialist realism. The second essay delivered an equally forthright assessment of Prichard, Hewett's much-loved fellow West Australian woman writer and Communist, strongly condemning her deforming and persistent allegiance to the Communist Party in Australia and the Soviet Union and the socialist realist aesthetics mandated by them. Separated by only nine years, these two pieces of non-fiction present the contradictory literary and political positions that book-end Hewett's turbulent and productive Cold War 1960s, and indicate the nature and importance of the repudiation of Prichard as a springboard for Hewett's writing in the 1970s. Approached chronologically, Hewett's essays of the 1960s demonstrate the imbrication of politics and literary aesthetics in her work. Initially reproducing the partisan contours of the relationship between politics and literature familiar from the Left cultural debates of the 1930s, Hewett finds increasingly different answers for this debate's foundational questions about the function of art, the role of the socially engaged artist, the importance of realism and what to do or think about modernism.' (Author's abstract)

Untitled Anthea Taylor , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , March vol. 36 no. 1 2012; (p. 119-120)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Sex and the City : New Novels by Women and Middlebrow Culture at Mid-Century Susan Sheridan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 1-12)
'Central to developments in Australian literature during the period from the end of Second World War until the mid-1960s - what might be called the 'long 1950s' - was the emergence of the kind of modernist novel written by Patrick White as the benchmark of modern fiction. This was the outcome of a struggle among opinion-makers in the literary field, which during this period came to be dominated for the first time by academic critics. They, by and large, favoured the new forms of postwar modernism and rejected that literary nationalism which had drawn the loyalty of most influential writers during the 1930s and 940s.' (Author's introduction)
Untitled Brigitta Olubas , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 115-118)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
"On Paths of Love and Pain" Nicolette Stasko , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 1 2011; (p. 219-223)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Non-Fiction Reviews Sandy McCutcheon , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 29 - 30 January 2011; (p. 25)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Women to Women Shirley Walker , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 328 2011; (p. 13-14)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Untitled Andrew Wrathall , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , Summer 2010-2011 vol. 90 no. 5 2010; (p. 37)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Blossoming Against the Odds Robert Hefner , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 12 February 2011; (p. 25)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Parallel Lives of Female Writers in Profile Brenda Niall , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 5 March 2011; (p. 37) The Sydney Morning Herald , 19-20 March 2011; (p. 31)

— Review of Nine Lives : Postwar Women Writers Making Their Mark Susan Sheridan , 2011 selected work biography
Leaving the Party : Dorothy Hewett, Literary Politics and the Long 1960s Fiona Morrison , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 36-50)

'What political, cultural and rhetorical changes occurred between the publication of Dorothy Hewett's nostalgic essay on Kylie Tenant in Westerly in late 1960 (Hewett, "How Beautiful Upon the Mountains") and her strikingly negative literary obituary of Katherine Susannah Prichard in Overland in late 1969 (Hewett, "Excess of Love: The Irrecon - cilable in Katharine Susannah Prichard")? The first of these essays offered a forthright series of criticisms about Tenant's interest in stylistic experimentation and the decline of her rather more interesting socialist realism. The second essay delivered an equally forthright assessment of Prichard, Hewett's much-loved fellow West Australian woman writer and Communist, strongly condemning her deforming and persistent allegiance to the Communist Party in Australia and the Soviet Union and the socialist realist aesthetics mandated by them. Separated by only nine years, these two pieces of non-fiction present the contradictory literary and political positions that book-end Hewett's turbulent and productive Cold War 1960s, and indicate the nature and importance of the repudiation of Prichard as a springboard for Hewett's writing in the 1970s. Approached chronologically, Hewett's essays of the 1960s demonstrate the imbrication of politics and literary aesthetics in her work. Initially reproducing the partisan contours of the relationship between politics and literature familiar from the Left cultural debates of the 1930s, Hewett finds increasingly different answers for this debate's foundational questions about the function of art, the role of the socially engaged artist, the importance of realism and what to do or think about modernism.' (Author's abstract)

Sex and the City : New Novels by Women and Middlebrow Culture at Mid-Century Susan Sheridan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October-November vol. 27 no. 3/4 2012; (p. 1-12)
'Central to developments in Australian literature during the period from the end of Second World War until the mid-1960s - what might be called the 'long 1950s' - was the emergence of the kind of modernist novel written by Patrick White as the benchmark of modern fiction. This was the outcome of a struggle among opinion-makers in the literary field, which during this period came to be dominated for the first time by academic critics. They, by and large, favoured the new forms of postwar modernism and rejected that literary nationalism which had drawn the loyalty of most influential writers during the 1930s and 940s.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 29 Mar 2011 12:59:44
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