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The Mummy's Curse single work   short story   horror  
Issue Details: First known date: 1962... 1962 The Mummy's Curse
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Nightmare Stories Charles Higham , Sydney : Horwitz , 1962 Z1728754 1962 anthology short story horror

    This collection of horror stories includes 'The Mummy's Curse' (James Workman), 'The Ghost of a Hand' (Sheridan Le Fanu), 'Sir Dominick's Bargain' (Sheridan Le Fanu), 'To Be Taken with a Grain of Salt' (Charles Dickens), 'A Horseman in the Sky' (Ambrose Bierce), 'The Suitor of Selkirk' (anon), 'How the Third Floor Knew the Potteries' (Amelia B. Edwards), 'Whistler's Mother' (D.W. Preston), and 'The Cask of Amontillado' (Edgar Allan Poe).

    Sydney : Horwitz , 1962
    pg. 9-24

Works about this Work

The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Last amended 30 Sep 2010 10:51:00
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