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Issue Details: First known date: 2010... 2010 Traitor
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'What would make a soldier betray his country?

'In the battle-smoke and chaos of Gallipoli, a young New Zealand soldier helps a Turkish doctor fighting to save a boy's life. Then a shell bursts nearby; the blast that should have killed them both consigns them instead to the same military hospital.

'Mahmoud is a Sufi. A whirling dervish, he says, of the Mevlevi order. He tells David stories. Of arriving in London with a pocketful of dried apricots. Of Majnun, the man mad for love, and of the saint who flew to paradise on a lion skin. You are God, we are all gods, Mahmoud tells David; and a bond grows between them.

'A bond so strong that David will betray his country for his friend.' (From the publisher's website.)

Notes

  • Dedication:

    Dedicated to the memory of
    C.A. Daisley - nee Lal Radcliffe
    1920-2009

  • Epigraph:

    I hate the idea of causes, and if I had to choose between betraying my
    country and betraying my friend, I hope I would have the guts to
    betray my country.

    E.M. Forster

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2010 .
      image of person or book cover 7161601008830455575.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 293p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 2 August 2010
      ISBN: 9781921656491 (pbk.)
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2011 .
      image of person or book cover 3209524675975800915.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 304p.
      Edition info: 2nd edition
      Note/s:
      • Published 2 May 2011
      ISBN: 9781921758379

Works about this Work

Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
The Year's Work in Fiction Annabel Smith , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 57 no. 1 2012; (p. 137-152)

— Review of When We Have Wings Claire Corbett , 2011 single work novel ; Shooting the Fox Marion Halligan , 2011 selected work short story ; Sarah Thornhill Kate Grenville , 2011 single work novel ; The Waterboys Peter Docker , 2011 single work novel ; Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel ; Inherited Amanda Curtin , 2011 selected work short story ; The Courier's New Bicycle Kim Westwood , 2011 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott , 2010 single work novel ; The Street Sweeper Elliot Perlman , 2011 single work novel ; Thought Crimes Tim Richards , 2011 selected work short story ; Black Glass Meg Mundell , 2010 single work novel ; The Cook Wayne McCauley , 2011 single work novel ; Wild History 1996 single work poetry ; A Common Loss Kirsten Tranter , 2011 single work novel
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

A Transnational Gallipoli? Roger Hillman , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 51 2011;
'Roger Hillman's essay adds a transnational dimension to representations of an historical event that has become the preeminent site of national memorialisation. In A Transnational Gallipoli?, Hillman contrasts the masculinist heroics and celebratory nationalism of Peter Weir's iconic film, Gallipoli, and Roger McDonald's 1915, with more recent novels and films produced outside Australia's borders that provide alternative forms of cultural memory. Louis de Bernières' Birds Without Wings and Tolga Örnek's documentary film Gallipoli: The Front Line Experience are significant as texts that 'situate the Gallipoli legend in a transnational rather than a national framework, while providing a fuller understanding of how cultural memory works in relation to the national imaginary'.' (Source: Editor's introduction)
The Year's Work in Fiction : 2010-2011 David Whish-Wilson , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 56 no. 1 2011; (p. 167-188)

— Review of Equator : A Novel Wayne Ashton , 2010 single work novel ; Rocks in the Belly Jon Bauer , 2010 single work novel ; Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel ; The Vintage and the Gleaning Jeremy Chambers , 2008 single work novel ; The Grand Hotel : A Novel Gregory Day , 2010 single work novel ; What Is Left Over, After Natasha Lester , 2008 single work novel ; The Best Australian Stories 2010 2010 anthology short story extract ; Five Bells Gail Jones , 2011 single work novel ; The Mary Smokes Boys Patrick Holland , 2010 single work novel ; Glissando : A Melodrama David Musgrave , 2010 single work novel ; Below the Styx Michael Meehan , 2010 single work novel ; Indelible Ink Fiona McGregor , 2010 single work novel ; When Colts Ran Roger McDonald , 2010 single work novel ; Bereft Chris Womersley , 2010 single work novel ; Time's Long Ruin : A Novel Stephen Orr , 2008 single work novel ; The Legacy Kirsten Tranter , 2010 single work novel ; That Deadman Dance Kim Scott , 2010 single work novel
A Taboo Worse than Treason Ian McFarlane , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 August 2010; (p. 23)

— Review of Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel
Untitled Rebecca Butterworth , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 90 no. 1 2010; (p. 43)

— Review of Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel
Off the Shelf : Fiction Lorien Kaye , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 21 August 2010; (p. 26)

— Review of Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel
Off the Shelf William Yeoman , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 31 August 2010; (p. 6)

— Review of Dead Man's Gold Michael Torres , 2010 single work children's fiction ; The Fremantle Doctor Frank Aquino , 2007 single work novel ; Sustenance Simone Lazaroo , 2010 single work novel ; Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel ; The West : Australian Poems 1989-2009 John Mateer , 2010 selected work poetry ; Takeshita Demons Cristy Burne , 2010 single work children's fiction
Love, Beauty and Loneliness Agnes Nieuwenhuizen , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Literary Review , September vol. 5 no. 8 2010; (p. 18)

— Review of Bereft Chris Womersley , 2010 single work novel ; Traitor Stephen Daisley , 2010 single work novel
A Pair of Ragged Claws Stephen Romei , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 5-6 March 2011; (p. 19)
A column canvassing current literary news.
Undercover Marc McEvoy , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 4-5 June 2011; (p. 29)
A column canvassing current literary news including the launch of Australian Poetry Library website, the launch of Austen Tayshus (2011) and a list of shortlisted entries for the 2011 Prime Minister's Literary Awards, Fiction, including Stephen Daisley.
First Success at Last as Writer Takes PM's Literary Award Michaela Boland , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 9-10 July 2011; (p. 2)
A Transnational Gallipoli? Roger Hillman , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 51 2011;
'Roger Hillman's essay adds a transnational dimension to representations of an historical event that has become the preeminent site of national memorialisation. In A Transnational Gallipoli?, Hillman contrasts the masculinist heroics and celebratory nationalism of Peter Weir's iconic film, Gallipoli, and Roger McDonald's 1915, with more recent novels and films produced outside Australia's borders that provide alternative forms of cultural memory. Louis de Bernières' Birds Without Wings and Tolga Örnek's documentary film Gallipoli: The Front Line Experience are significant as texts that 'situate the Gallipoli legend in a transnational rather than a national framework, while providing a fuller understanding of how cultural memory works in relation to the national imaginary'.' (Source: Editor's introduction)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Last amended 4 Dec 2014 10:43:31
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