Issue Details: First known date: 2010... 2010 My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'How does a daughter tell the story of her father?

Sheila Fitzpatrick was taught from an early age to question authority. She learnt it from her father, the journalist and radical historian Brian Fitzpatrick. But very soon, she began to turn her questioning gaze on him.

Teasing apart the many layers of memory, Fitzpatrick reveals a complex portrait of an Australian family against a Cold War backdrop. As her relationship with her father fades from girlhood adoration to adolescent scepticism, she flees Melbourne for Oxford to start a new life. But it's not so easy to escape being her father's daughter.

My Father's Daughter is a vivid evocation of an Australian childhood; a personal memoir told with the piercing insight of a historian.' (From the publisher's website.)

Notes

  • Dedication: To my brother

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 2010 .
      Extent: 260p. [8]p. of platesp.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references.
      ISBN: 9780522857474 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

Writing History/Writing about Yourself : What’s the Difference? Sheila Fitzpatrick , single work criticism

'According to Philippe Lejeune, writers of autobiography implicitly sign a pact with the reader to tell the truth, or at least the truth as they know it, about themselves.2 That is, primarily a subjective truth. As for facts, the expectation is presumably that autobiographers will convey the facts as they know or remember them, but without a necessary obligation to check their memory through documentary or other research. There is no autobiographer’s commitment to objectivity, rather the contrary. The autobiographical truth is, by definition, a subjective one.' (Introduction)

Walvin, Fitzpatrick and Rickard : Three Autobiographies of Childhood and Coming of Age Doug Munro , Geoffrey Gray , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Clio’s Lives 2017; (p. 39-64)

'Once a comparatively rare beast, historians’ autobiographies are becoming prevalent to the point of being commonplace. Since the 1980s, such works have crystallised into a genre and have become a historiographic growth area. Limiting the head count to monograph-length works, a dozen historians’ memoirs were published in the 1970s, rising to three dozen in the 1980s, five dozen in the 1990s, and the contributions continue apace. Once on the fringes of the historical enterprise, historians’ memoirs are now edging closer to centre stage. Increasing frequency has lent respectability. There remain significant pockets of resistance, the usual canards being that autobiography is inescapably egotistical, self-indulgent and narcissistic. Nonetheless, the genre is rapidly gaining acceptance and being treated seriously – and not simply historians’ autobiographies but autobiography by academics generally. Almost without exception, historians’ autobiographies contain a chapter or chapters on childhood and coming of age. In parallel with the increasing prevalence of historians’ autobiographies, a subgenre devoted to the childhoods through to the young adulthoods of historians has also become a growth area. We are concerned in this chapter with three such works: Sheila Fitzpatrick’s My Father’s Daughter (2010); John Rickard’s An Imperial Affair (2013); and James Walvin’s Different Times (2014).' (Introduction)

Demoyte's Grey Suit : Writing Memoirs, Writing History Sheila Fitzpatrick , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 362 2014; (p. 26-30)
Tears Open Doors Christine Wallace , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 21 July 2012; (p. 5)
Untitled David Dunstan , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reviews in Australian Studies , vol. 6 no. 1 2012; (p. 1-2)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography
Non-Fiction Reviews Gillian Bramley-Moore , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 - 8 August 2010; (p. 24)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography
Flaws in the Family Mark Thomas , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 7 August 2010; (p. 25)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography
Cover Notes Lucy Sussex , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 8 August 2010; (p. 21)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography ; Holy Water James P. Othmer 2010 single work novel ; Spinning Out Christine Darcas 2010 single work novel
Untitled Lyndal More , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , August vol. 90 no. 1 2010; (p. 45)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography
Engaging Personal History Lorien Kaye , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 August 2010; (p. 27)

— Review of My Father's Daughter : Memories of an Australian Childhood Sheila Fitzpatrick 2010 single work autobiography
Sheila Fitzpatrick Tim Elliott , 2010 single work biography
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 14-15 August 2010; (p. 30)
Can You Write a History of Yourself Sheila Fitzpatrick , 2011 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Griffith Review , Spring no. 33 2011;
Tears Open Doors Christine Wallace , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 21 July 2012; (p. 5)
Demoyte's Grey Suit : Writing Memoirs, Writing History Sheila Fitzpatrick , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 362 2014; (p. 26-30)
Writing History/Writing about Yourself : What’s the Difference? Sheila Fitzpatrick , single work criticism

'According to Philippe Lejeune, writers of autobiography implicitly sign a pact with the reader to tell the truth, or at least the truth as they know it, about themselves.2 That is, primarily a subjective truth. As for facts, the expectation is presumably that autobiographers will convey the facts as they know or remember them, but without a necessary obligation to check their memory through documentary or other research. There is no autobiographer’s commitment to objectivity, rather the contrary. The autobiographical truth is, by definition, a subjective one.' (Introduction)

Last amended 26 Nov 2013 15:50:59
Subjects:
  • Melbourne, Victoria,
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • 1940s
  • 1950s
  • 1960s
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