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Issue Details: First known date: 2001... 2001 Poor Bugger Whitefella Got No Dreaming : The Representation and Appropriation of Published Dreaming Narratives with Special Reference to David Unaipon's Writings
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Critically reviews the many and varied representations of Aboriginal Dreaming narratives that have appeared in print since Australia's colonisation. A special focus is the writings of Ngarrindjeri man, David Unaipon. Dreaming narratives contain knowledge, and all knowledge systems are influenced by the circumstances in which they emerge. Challenges those with an interest in representing indigenous knowledge in print to respect the rights of the indigenous owners, and to strive to maintain the integrity of their texts.' Source: Libraries Australia (Sighted 12/07/2010).

Notes

  • Thesis (Ph.D.), Adelaide University, Department of European Studies, 2001.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      Adelaide, South Australia,: 2001 .
      Extent: ix, 354, 123 leavesp.
      Note/s:
      • Bibliography: leaves 337-354.

Works about this Work

Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Can Indigenous Contemporary Literature of Australia Sustain Itself by Becoming International? Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2007 single work criticism 'Nourishing and sustaining cultural diversity in today's constantly changing world, with all its complexities and socio-cultural peculiarities of people and their creations, and at times of an aggressive economic Anglophone globalisation of cultures and literatures, is a task of an imperative formation that needs to be cared for at many levels of the social life and organisation. In Australia, to maintain one's own culture is to be persistently aware of personal heritage and to be able to elaborate traditions. As time passes quickly and we live in a world that praises swiftness and efficiency, money and mass culture, losing the mother tongue and become estranged from our cultural environments occurs frequently. Everyday mainstream cultural reality pushes us to concentrate on our own area of work...'(From author's introduction)
Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Can Indigenous Contemporary Literature of Australia Sustain Itself by Becoming International? Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2007 single work criticism 'Nourishing and sustaining cultural diversity in today's constantly changing world, with all its complexities and socio-cultural peculiarities of people and their creations, and at times of an aggressive economic Anglophone globalisation of cultures and literatures, is a task of an imperative formation that needs to be cared for at many levels of the social life and organisation. In Australia, to maintain one's own culture is to be persistently aware of personal heritage and to be able to elaborate traditions. As time passes quickly and we live in a world that praises swiftness and efficiency, money and mass culture, losing the mother tongue and become estranged from our cultural environments occurs frequently. Everyday mainstream cultural reality pushes us to concentrate on our own area of work...'(From author's introduction)
Last amended 26 Feb 2014 09:17:57
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