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y separately published work icon Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years single work   autobiography  
First known date: 1962 Issue Details: First known date: 1962... 1962 Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Miles Franklin wrote Childhood at Brindabella, an autobiography, in 1952-53, but it wasn't published until after her death in 1954. It is a story of an idyllic time, spent in the hills of Brindabella near present-day Canberra, and full of sunshine, sweet ripe fruit and interesting relations. This is a timely new edition of a significant work by one of Australia's best-loved authors. Miles Franklin (1879-1954) spent her first ten years at Brindabella, near Canberra, before the family moved to a property near Goulburn, the setting for her autobiographical novel, My Brilliant Career. Miles Franklin was a feminist and a socialist, working in America with Alice Henry in the National Women's Trade Union League.'

Source: Publisher's blurb (2003 ed.).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1963 .
      image of person or book cover 1087829365577142033.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xiv, 162p.p.
      Description: illus., maps.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1974 .
      image of person or book cover 7757426601411235087.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xii, 162p.p.
      ISBN: 0207131503, 020713149X (pbk)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Eden Paperbacks ,
      1987 .
      image of person or book cover 6557400307496141539.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xii, 162p.p.
      ISBN: 0207158436 (pbk)
      Series: Eden Paperbacks Angus and Robertson (publisher), 1987 series - publisher This paperback imprint of Angus and Robertson was launched in September 1987. The first titles included Upfield's Winds of Evil and Derryn Hinch's Death at Newport.
    • North Sydney, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Richmond , 2003 .
      image of person or book cover 1495689650673999029.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: v, 154p.
      Description: bibl.
      ISBN: 1920688110
    • Bayswater, Ferntree Gully area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: ETT Imprint , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 5935238555506480299.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Description: Ebook
      ISBN: 9780648096320, 0648096327

Other Formats

  • Also braille, sound recording.

Works about this Work

Encounters with Amnesia: Confronting the Ghosts of Australian Landscape Inga Simpson , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , January no. 63 2019; (p. 272-281)

'Nature writing has never been more popular. In recent years it has become an international publishing phenomenon, with titles such as Helen Macdonald's 'H is for Hawk' (Jonathan Cape, 2014), Robert Macfarlane's 'Landmarks' (Hamish Hamilton, 2015), Amy Liptrot's 'The Outrun' (Canongate, 2016) and Sy Montgomery's 'How to be a Good Creature' (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018) scoring significant worldwide success. Australia, too, has its own rich history of nature writing. For more than a century, nature writing was 'the' primary literature for writing the country; a vital part of the ongoing process, for settler-Australians, of coming to feel at home in what were initially unfamiliar environments, and of creating a sense of national identity around them. Yet, today, nature writing is not widely known or understood here, and it's apparent that more Australians have read 'H is for Hawk' (18,000 copies sold so far according to Bookscan) than any of our own contemporary works.' (Publication abstract)

 

Going To The Silences Maggie MacKellar , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , June 2017;

'A long time ago, after the publicity had finished for my first memoir When It Rains and while I was still brimming with writing confidence and no real direction I dreamed what my next book was to be. Woken by a willie wagtail calling outside my window I reached for the notebook on the bedside table. With eyes still sticky with sleep I scrawled down the details of the extraordinary walk I had just taken with Miles Franklin.' (Introduction)

Revisiting the Frontier, from Miles Franklin's Brindabella to South Australia's Eyre Peninsula Jill Roe , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Colonial History , no. 15 2013; (p. 169-182)

'As a South Australian by birth and an early enthusiast for urban history, I was not deeply impressed by Russel Ward in my youth. However, that was a long time ago. Since then I have come to appreciate The Australian Legend (1958) and to feel that it could be better understood. No doubt my own work on Miles Franklin, and my days on South Australia's Eyre Peninsula, some of which I will be referring to shortly, has had good deal to do with it; but so too has an increasing awareness of the challenges now facing rural and regional Australia. In what follows, I start with the young Russel Ward and what led him to focus on the pastoral frontier of eastern Australia. Next comes a consideration of the Legend's relevance to two very different regions, the Brindabella area in the southern mountains of New South Wales, and Eyre Peninsula, the western most peninsula of South Australia, both of which as it happens were first colonised by Europeans in the 1840s. Lastly, by way of conclusion, I offer some observations on the changing face of 'the frontier' since the 1950s, drawing on my own experience. That may sound rather presumptuous. But it is more or less in line with the task that Ward set for us in the final paragraph of his book, which reads in full: It is generally agreed that without a distinctive national tradition a people lacks cohesion, balance, and confidence. It is usually assumed that in a young country like ours, inherited attitudes exert less influence than in old one. The truth maybe that, because of its relative youth, our tradition is at once too dominating and too rigid, and that we tend compulsively to worship it as, so to speak, a fair though sacred cow. But nothing could be more thoroughly within the tradition than 'to give it a go' - to venture boldly on new courses of action, and so modify, and even create, traditions as the anonymous bushmen, and, later, the men of the 'nineties did. Today's task might well be to develop those features of the Australian tradition which still seem valid in modern conditions.' (Introduction)

Brindabella Child Goes On to a Brilliant Career Russell Wenholz , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 25 March 2007; (p. 21)
Miles Franklin and Her Brindabella Childhood Terry Birtles , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 70 2006; (p. 16-28)
Winter Reading Lolla Stewart , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 252 2003; (p. 57-58)

— Review of Mailman of the Birdsville Track : The Story of Tom Kruse Kristin Weidenbach , 2003 single work biography ; And What Have You Done Lately? Cornelia Frances , 2003 single work autobiography ; Cecilia : An Ex-Nun's Extraordinary Journey Cecilia Inglis , 2003 single work autobiography ; Sailing Alone Around the World Joshua Slocum , 1899 single work autobiography ; Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years Miles Franklin , 1962 single work autobiography ; A Guide to Australian Folklore: From Ned Kelly to Aeroplane Jelly Graham Seal , Gwenda Beed Davey , 2003 reference
Untitled 1963 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 24 August 1963; (p. 8)

— Review of Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years Miles Franklin , 1962 single work autobiography
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman Verna Coleman , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , October vol. 23 no. 10 1979; (p. 67-69)

— Review of My Brilliant Career Miles Franklin , 1901 single work novel ; Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years Miles Franklin , 1962 single work autobiography
A Job Lot David Hutchison , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , September no. 3 1963; (p. 77,79-80)

— Review of Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years Miles Franklin , 1962 single work autobiography ; Tourmaline Randolph Stow , 1963 single work novel
Miles on Miles Peter Ward , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August vol. 2 no. 10 1963; (p. 167)

— Review of Childhood at Brindabella : My First Ten Years Miles Franklin , 1962 single work autobiography
Miles Franklin and Her Brindabella Childhood Terry Birtles , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 70 2006; (p. 16-28)
Brindabella Child Goes On to a Brilliant Career Russell Wenholz , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 25 March 2007; (p. 21)
Miles Franklin's Childhood at Brindabella Joy W. Hooton , 1987 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 46 no. 1 1987; (p. 58-66)
"Infinite Rehearsal" in the Work of Miles Franklin Brigitta Olubas , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , Winter South no. 18 1989; (p. 37-47)
Bobilla Days M. H. Ellis , 1963 single work column biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 September vol. 85 no. 4362 1963; (p. 38,40)
Last amended 19 Nov 2019 16:58:05
Settings:
  • Canberra region (NSW), Southeastern NSW, New South Wales,
  • 1879-1889
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