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Issue Details: First known date: 2010... 2010 Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Remembering Patrick White presents the first major study of the full range of White’s work in over twenty-five years, and aims to bring this important author up to date for new generations of readers and scholars. Patrick White is a writer of moods and perspectives and the essays collected here range in their focus over his public presentations, his formal challenges, his spiritual leanings and dramatic gestures. They examine the breadth and significance of White’s intellectual contribution and consider the ongoing legacy of his thought and his art within national and international frames. As a collection, they focus our attention on what Patrick White means at the juncture of the present, reading his work through contemporary critical perspectives that further underscore the dynamism and substance of his writing. (Publisher's blurb)

Exhibitions

6681414

Contents

* Contents derived from the Amsterdam,
c
Netherlands,
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
New York (City), New York (State),
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
Rodopi , 2010 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Public Recluse : Patrick White's Literary-Political Returns, Brigid Rooney , 2010 single work criticism
Riders in the Chariot : A Tale for Our Times, Bernadette Brennan , 2007 single work criticism
'This article rereads Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot against some of the past criticism of the text. It argues that the text has much to say about the contemporary politics of fear operating in Australia and demonstrates that many of the historical readings of White as an elitist, alienated Modernist cannot be sustained. The contemporary relevance and force of this novel arises from a double movement: the beauty of White's prose operates continually to allow us to perceive the "infinite in everything" but it also helps us understand the absolutely ordinary fears and insecurities of the suburban Australian consciousness. Through the ordinary everydayness of his Australian characters (other than the riders) we see all too clearly how the ignorance and prejudice of a very small few have the ability to snowball with catastrophic consequences. Himmelfarb, in the face of horror, turned away from literature believing that intellectual reasoning had failed humanity. Today it is the fear of intellectual reasoning that has the potential to make us all less than we have the potential to be.' (Author's abstract)
Patrick White and his Award, Rodney Wetherell , 2010 single work criticism
Homo Nullius : The Politics of Pessimism in Patrick White’s The Tree of Man, Jennifer Rutherford , 2010 single work criticism
The Symbol in Patrick White, Anthony Uhlmann , 2010 single work criticism
The Lateness and Queerness of The Twyborn Affair : White’s Farewell to the Novel, Elizabeth McMahon , 2010 single work criticism
The Presence of the Sacred in Patrick White, Bill Ashcroft , 2010 single work criticism
Voss : Earthed and Transformative Sacredness, Lyn McCredden , 2010 single work criticism
The Dragon Slayer : Patrick White and the Contestation of History, Veronica Brady , 2010 single work criticism
The Late, Crazy Plays, John McCallum , 2010 single work criticism
“Some of the Doors of the House Have Never Been Seen Open” : Poetic Habitation and Civil Space in Patrick White’s Early Drama, Brigitta Olubas , 2010 single work criticism
Against the Androgyne as Humanist He(te)ro : Patrick White’s Queering of the Platonic Myth, Graham Henry Smith , 2010 single work criticism
Patrick White, 1994–2009, Lorraine Burdett , 2010 single work bibliography

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Rodopi ,
      2010 .
      Extent: xvii, 218p.p.
      ISBN: 9789042028494

Works about this Work

Untitled Nicholas Birns , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reviews in Australian Studies , vol. 6 no. 4 2012;

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Untitled Elizabeth Webby , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 26 no. 1 2011; (p. 105-109)

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
The Solid Mandala and Patrick White’s Late Modernity Nicholas Birns , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'This essay contends that the Australian novelist Patrick White (1912-1990) presents, in his novel The Solid Mandala (1966), a prototypical evocation of late modernity that indicates precisely why and how it was different from the neoliberal and postmodern era that succeeded it. Late modernity is currently emerging as a historical period, though still a nascent and contested one. Robert Hassan speaks of the 1950-1970 era as a period which, in its 'Fordist' mode of production maintained a certain conformity yet held off the commoditisation of later neoliberalism's 'network-driven capitalism'. This anchors the sense of 'late modernity,' that will operate in this essay, though my sense of the period also follows on definitions of the term established, in very different contexts, by Edward Lucie-Smith and Tyrus Miller.' (Author's introduction)
Continentally Shelved Charles Lock , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 330 2011; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Patrick White Within the Western Literary Tradition John Beston , 2010 single work criticism ; Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays Edited by Elizabeth McMahon and Brigitta Olubas Georgina Loveridge , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays Edited by Elizabeth McMahon and Brigitta Olubas Georgina Loveridge , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 10 2010;

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Continentally Shelved Charles Lock , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 330 2011; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Patrick White Within the Western Literary Tradition John Beston , 2010 single work criticism ; Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Untitled Elizabeth Webby , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 26 no. 1 2011; (p. 105-109)

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
Untitled Nicholas Birns , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Reviews in Australian Studies , vol. 6 no. 4 2012;

— Review of Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010 selected work criticism
The Solid Mandala and Patrick White’s Late Modernity Nicholas Birns , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'This essay contends that the Australian novelist Patrick White (1912-1990) presents, in his novel The Solid Mandala (1966), a prototypical evocation of late modernity that indicates precisely why and how it was different from the neoliberal and postmodern era that succeeded it. Late modernity is currently emerging as a historical period, though still a nascent and contested one. Robert Hassan speaks of the 1950-1970 era as a period which, in its 'Fordist' mode of production maintained a certain conformity yet held off the commoditisation of later neoliberalism's 'network-driven capitalism'. This anchors the sense of 'late modernity,' that will operate in this essay, though my sense of the period also follows on definitions of the term established, in very different contexts, by Edward Lucie-Smith and Tyrus Miller.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 6 Apr 2011 16:44:57
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